Canyon Duramax 4wd or 2wd ? - Escape Trailer Owners Community

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Old 01-30-2018, 03:06 PM   #1
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Canyon Duramax 4wd or 2wd ?

Iím about to purchase a GMC Canyon to tow my Escape 5.0. Which is best for towing; a
4wd or 2wd? Please explain why.

Thanks, Rick
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Old 01-30-2018, 03:15 PM   #2
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A 4 wheel drive truck normally has a lower payload weight limit than a two wheel drive truck. This may or may not be an issue with a 5.0 TA towed by a Canyon
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Old 01-30-2018, 03:50 PM   #3
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i have only towed our trailer for a couple of years and have towed with both. I think a two wheel drive would work fine most of the time, but I think you might wish you had four wheel drive if stuck in mud or on wet grass though to say nothing about snow. I also think four wheel drive would have a higher resale value. We purchased a four wheel drive Tacoma and although the two wheel drive may get a slight bit better fuel economy and have a slight better towing capacity I feel better knowing that that four wheel drive switch is right there.
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Old 01-30-2018, 04:34 PM   #4
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A 2 wheel drive with a limited slip rear is right there in between the two....
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Old 01-30-2018, 04:39 PM   #5
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Initial cost won't be offset by resale value

The 4-wheel drive will cost more to purchase and maintain. I doubt these costs will be offset when selling the truck. The reason the payload is lower on the 4wd is because of its additional weight.

I've gotten by driving for 60 years without 4wd, but I seldom drive off-road and avoid snow as much as possible, especially when towing.
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Old 01-30-2018, 05:43 PM   #6
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I would think the answer depends on where and when you plan to tow your trailer, and your tolerance to deal with the uncertainty about weather and how it can affect your plans. If you plan to travel only during snow-free months, and never off road or on dirt roads, I'd say you'd be fine with 2WD. Personally, I wouldn't tow with a 2WD, but I live in Idaho and travel in the mountains of the western US and Canada. Snow is possible every month of the year, and I just don't want to have to worry about getting stuck. I was also involved in a non-snow situation where folks had pulled their trailers onto a flat spot just off a dirt road and parked them for an outdoor music event. Two days later, there was a big rainstorm, and people with 2WD trucks couldn't budge their trailers, they were totally stuck in the mud. Had to get a local rancher to bring his tractor to pull them out. While it is still possible to get stuck with a 4WD vehicle, it does narrow the range of conditions in which you can have a problem. Also if you're towing up a steep dirt road, 4WD can prevent your rear tires from spinning out and fish-tailing. Again, it depends on when and where you're planning to take your trailer, and whether you'll be boondocking off paved roads or staying in RV parks. Either way, if you go with a 2WD, I'd definitely carry tire chains and know how to use them. Hope this helps!
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Old 01-30-2018, 06:26 PM   #7
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For years I drove two wheel drive trucks. Always had to carry chains in the winter and even then it was iffy sometimes unless I had a bunch of weight in the back....which shot my gas mileage. Then I switched to an AWD vehicle for my every day driver and a 4WD truck for my TV. Won't go back. Snow? No problem. Bad road? No problem. Just don't get cocky when the road says 4WD only since it's likely REALLY terrible in bad weather. So I make my camping choices wisely given forecast conditions.
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Old 01-30-2018, 11:55 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by D&R_MA View Post
The 4-wheel drive will cost more to purchase and maintain. I doubt these costs will be offset when selling the truck.
It will certainly cost more, but I would expect that trying to sell a two-wheel-drive Canyon or Colorado here would be frustrating... you would be begging anyone to take it. Only 5 of the 70 current-generation Colorados and Canyons listed in this area on AutoTrader.ca are 2WD, and half of them are base "work trucks". It depends on the local market.
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Old 01-31-2018, 12:00 AM   #9
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It will certainly cost more, but I would expect that trying to sell a two-wheel-drive Canyon or Colorado here would be frustrating... you would be begging anyone to take it. It depends on the local market.
Local market should change now that Suncor is deploying self-driving haul trucks in the oil ( tar ) sands.
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Old 01-31-2018, 12:19 AM   #10
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Local market should change now that Suncor is deploying self-driving haul trucks in the oil ( tar ) sands.

Many thousands lost their jobs here in the last few years... and still, no one buys 2WD pickups. Take a few former haul truck drivers out of the market and pickup owners will still insist on 4WD... and the most powerful engine they can get, and cabs big enough to carry a whole family while they commute to work solo, etc.

We did have a 2WD pickup, but that was a couple of decades ago. It was also a standard-cab short-box - try to find one of those now!
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Old 01-31-2018, 12:31 AM   #11
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Can't beat my Datsun pickup. Seats for two. No radio. Was asked what colour I wanted and I said I didn't care. Got a yellow one.
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Old 01-31-2018, 09:51 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by lzcamper View Post
Iím about to purchase a GMC Canyon to tow my Escape 5.0. Which is best for towing; a
4wd or 2wd? Please explain why.

Thanks, Rick
"For towing", 99% of the time, no difference. Doing 25 m/h down a freshly ice glazed interstate, f'glass trailer on back, 4 high is necessary.

As for the 80+% of the time you're not towing. If there was such a thing as a burly, limited slip fwd option, then I'd consider it. But pickups, and pickups with heavy diesel engines in particular, have notoriously poor unloaded traction. And even if you don't boonie bash, IMO, you will want to have the extra traction often enough that you will be muttering to yourself if you spin and get stuck.

We've used/needed ours maybe 6 times in the last 5 years. Almost all of those times, we were either in the middle of big cities or were crawling down glazed highways, towing f'glass trailers. Used it without towing one time, a few years ago. I ran errands for family/friends with feet of snow on city streets, when the fall out ran the clearing equipment.

Extra cost/weight/maintenance/slight loss of payload, all true. But it wasn't even a close call for us.
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Old 02-02-2018, 01:45 AM   #13
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Thanks to all of you for taking time to answer my question. After missing twice to secure a truck in the past two weeks, I finally purchased a 2wd Canyon crew/long bed with a locking rear differential. Although, a 4wd might offer more “peace of mind”, the 2wd should work just fine for the places I camp.

Thanks again, Rick
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Old 02-02-2018, 05:21 AM   #14
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I think you will be pleased with the locking rear performance in slippery weather, my Dakota got me thru the Valentine's Day Snowmaggedon back in 2003, 24" snow
https://www.bing.com/images/search?q...2003&FORM=IGRE
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Old 02-02-2018, 08:39 AM   #15
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Quote:
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"For towing", 99% of the time, no difference. Doing 25 m/h down a freshly ice glazed interstate, f'glass trailer on back, 4 high is necessary.
We started towing our Escape with an F150 2wd with no snow tires, and it was fine, except will never forget the scary January drive from Sioux Falls SD to KC area on I29, especially once we hit the hills in MO. Fresh snow right lane super slippery, felt a few times I was losing control. Transports flying by in the snow covered left lane at 70mph

Now have a 4wd with snow tires, and although I didn't consider how much payload we'd lose I find as long as I don't fill up the back seat and box with stuff, am within the limit. And the snow tires will still be on when we head to AL, GA, and FL in March. Since having the new truck had one site had to back the trailer uphill starting in a "mudhole" and only made it account 4wd low. YMMV.

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