F-150 payload - Escape Trailer Owners Community

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Old 02-27-2018, 02:59 PM   #1
Tin
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F-150 payload

2011 ford manual. On page 257 it gives steps for determining your truck's load limits. Here they are, simplified:

1) Locate the Yellow Sticker payload number.

2) "Determine the combined weight of the driver and passengers that will be riding in the vehicle."

3) Subtract "the combined weight of the driver and passengers" from the Yellow sticker payload.

4) "The resulting figure equals the available amount of cargo and luggage load capacity"

Summary: driver weight (150#) is NOT included in Ford's payload number.

There is mentioned an assumed 150 lb driver towards the max tow capacity but that has nothing to do with payload.

1. Payload is what the truck can carry. How much weight you can put in the cab, in the bed, on the roof, on the racks, on the hitch, before the GVWR and axle ratings are exceeded.

2. Towing capacity is how much the truck can pull. The weight of the fully loaded trailer and all of the stuff jammed into it.

3. Combined Weight Rating - the weight of the truck, the trailer, and all of the junk crammed into both.

Since the hitch weight of the trailer gets added into #1 above, the GVWR is likely to be exceeded before the towing capacity is reached.

Tin.
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Old 02-27-2018, 04:30 PM   #2
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if you got additional pay load would that be included in the door sticker?
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Old 02-27-2018, 04:39 PM   #3
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Yes it would.
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Old 02-27-2018, 05:53 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fox hunt View Post
if you got additional pay load would that be included in the door sticker?
The sticker on your truck is specifically for that truck with factory installed options. The high payload option would definitely be a factory installed option.🙂
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Old 02-27-2018, 06:00 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tin View Post
2011 ford manual. On page 257 it gives steps for determining your truck's load limits. Here they are, simplified:

1) Locate the Yellow Sticker payload number.

2) "Determine the combined weight of the driver and passengers that will be riding in the vehicle."

3) Subtract "the combined weight of the driver and passengers" from the Yellow sticker payload.

4) "The resulting figure equals the available amount of cargo and luggage load capacity"

Summary: driver weight (150#) is NOT included in Ford's payload number.

There is mentioned an assumed 150 lb driver towards the max tow capacity but that has nothing to do with payload.

1. Payload is what the truck can carry. How much weight you can put in the cab, in the bed, on the roof, on the racks, on the hitch, before the GVWR and axle ratings are exceeded.

2. Towing capacity is how much the truck can pull. The weight of the fully loaded trailer and all of the stuff jammed into it.

3. Combined Weight Rating - the weight of the truck, the trailer, and all of the junk crammed into both.

Since the hitch weight of the trailer gets added into #1 above, the GVWR is likely to be exceeded before the towing capacity is reached.

Tin.
For 2016 Ford did allow 150lbs for driver. This I got from their website when researching my vehicle. Newer or older couldn’t say. Bottom line here is if the weight of the driver can make or break your payload needs you might want to upgrade your tow. Just saying🙂
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Old 02-27-2018, 06:53 PM   #6
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In reality, the only difference between an F250 and an F350, the F350 having a greater cargo capacity, is the addition of one more leaf (spring) in the rear suspension. If you do not believe me, go ask someone who knows at your local Ford dealer. Perhaps the head salesman or the service manager, but not the girl (or guy) who answers the phone. In some cases, higher load rated tires may be installed as it comes from the factory. However, the cargo capacity of any F150 can be increased by alterations to the rear suspension (helper springs, Roadmaster Active Suspension). I am a fan of the Roadmaster because it is adjustable and it does not stiffen the ride when no payload is being transported. It utilizes a horizontal coil spring and works progressively as more payload is added. One really does not need to spend thousands of dollars upgrading an F150 to a beefier truck to safely tow a 5.0TA and carry additional equipment.
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Old 02-27-2018, 07:42 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by C&G in FL View Post
In reality, the only difference between an F250 and an F350, the F350 having a greater cargo capacity, is the addition of one more leaf (spring) in the rear suspension. If you do not believe me, go ask someone who knows at your local Ford dealer. Perhaps the head salesman or the service manager, but not the girl (or guy) who answers the phone. In some cases, higher load rated tires may be installed as it comes from the factory. However, the cargo capacity of any F150 can be increased by alterations to the rear suspension (helper springs, Roadmaster Active Suspension). I am a fan of the Roadmaster because it is adjustable and it does not stiffen the ride when no payload is being transported. It utilizes a horizontal coil spring and works progressively as more payload is added. One really does not need to spend thousands of dollars upgrading an F150 to a beefier truck to safely tow a 5.0TA and carry additional equipment.
You can upgrade your payload in any number of ways from Timbren or Sumo poly springs, airbags, adding to or replacing the leaf springs right up to complete replacement of rear suspension with an air ride set up. As long as wheels and tires match your up grade your good to go. Unless you find yourself in a situation where you have to be weighed.😫
Not sure how often that happens towing a camper.
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Old 02-27-2018, 07:44 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by C&G in FL View Post
In reality, the only difference between an F250 and an F350, the F350 having a greater cargo capacity, is the addition of one more leaf (spring) in the rear suspension. If you do not believe me, go ask someone who knows at your local Ford dealer. Perhaps the head salesman or the service manager, but not the girl (or guy) who answers the phone. In some cases, higher load rated tires may be installed as it comes from the factory. However, the cargo capacity of any F150 can be increased by alterations to the rear suspension (helper springs, Roadmaster Active Suspension). I am a fan of the Roadmaster because it is adjustable and it does not stiffen the ride when no payload is being transported. It utilizes a horizontal coil spring and works progressively as more payload is added. One really does not need to spend thousands of dollars upgrading an F150 to a beefier truck to safely tow a 5.0TA and carry additional equipment.
I do not know who gave you this information but it is all pretty much incorrect.
The item mentioned do NOT increase your payload and the difference between a 150 to 250 and 350 is much much more than than a leaf spring.
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Old 02-27-2018, 07:50 PM   #9
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I ordered my 1999 F-250 with a heavy duty suspension option. From what I recall, they added yet another leaf to the rear springs, added slightly longer spring shackles so the frame could squat a little more under load (which raised the rear end about 1 1/2 inches), then raised the front end higher to level the frame. And I think it came with load range E tires. Now that I think of it, I'm not really sure what they did to raise the front end. I need to take a close look at the front suspension sometime to see how they did that.
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Old 02-27-2018, 07:58 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by Chotch View Post
You can upgrade your payload in any number of ways from Timbren or Sumo poly springs, airbags, adding to or replacing the leaf springs right up to complete replacement of rear suspension with an air ride set up. As long as wheels and tires match your up grade your good to go. Unless you find yourself in a situation where you have to be weighed.��
Not sure how often that happens towing a camper.
You can install third party add on's to improve your handling or add Timbren or Sumo to level your truck but you are not increasing your vehicles pay load you are actually decreasing it by adding more wieght .
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