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Old 02-20-2016, 01:55 PM   #41
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Glad to see there is peace.
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Old 02-20-2016, 02:07 PM   #42
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Just a thought...

Just a thought, to stir the pot. For the 5th wheel and 21 owners out there. Are the “Heavy Duty” trucks built better? Maybe I just got lucky but my current vehicle is still rock solid after 13 years of use. My neighbor is running a 12-year-old 2500 duramax and after hauling a goose neck trailer up and down the Mcarthy Road on countless trips is still in excellent shape. I’m kind of sold on the “Heavy Duties” for longevity. Okay, off to have the dog take me for a walk. Scott

(Quick edit, this is just for pick ups, we also own a Santa Fe that has been a great car)

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Old 02-20-2016, 02:48 PM   #43
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I cannot really comment on whether they are built better, however we are glad we ended up getting an F-150 to tow our 5.0 "classic." We originally planned to get a Tacoma or Frontier. I have no worries about power to tow, have been over a few minor passes in NM and AZ (we're now in Tucson) and the mileage is little reduced towing from non-towing. I felt confident the other day to tow about 40 minutes into Tucson without trailer brakes (problem with controller - getting it fixed here), hardly felt any different stopping I just left a little extra room ahead of me

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Old 02-20-2016, 03:10 PM   #44
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Originally Posted by M.W.Deters View Post
It's about safety and ultimately what is your budget for that? I've seen countless vehicles with trailers crawling up steep grades posing a significant hazard to others who had to maneuver around them.
I suppose, then, that every commercial truck (the "big rigs", "semis", or whatever you want to call real Class 8 trucks with tens of tons of trailer) is a hazard... because they are all snail-slow up a significant grade compared to our rigs, since they don't have the thousands of horsepower they would need to keep up.

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Originally Posted by sunrisetrucker View Post
I guess if I was to follow your logic to it's completion I would be pulling my 17B with my 500 HP Mack truck.
That seems to be the theme of many of these "get a big truck" topics. By the way, that 500 hp Mack is slow up a hill compared to a 300 hp SUV, because the Mack weighs so much (8 to 10 tons).

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Originally Posted by PGDriver View Post
That's a cloud of diesel and Mark going up a hill passing everyone.
Hmm... but when my minivan and 17-foot trailer have encountered diesel pickups and their trailers on mountain grades, I'm always the one doing the passing. Since my minivan is over a decade old, it is behind the times and has much less engine power than current offerings.
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Old 02-20-2016, 03:14 PM   #45
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Originally Posted by Klem View Post
ETI was known as a builder of small light trailers. This forum and ETI now encourages 2 footitis and purchasing the high profit 21 and 5th wheel. Those big boxes can be filled easily and are no longer 'light' trailers.
  • Members can make the own interpretations of forum and manufacturer messages, but some things are simply facts:
  • Escapes and the other moulded fiberglass trailers have never been exceptionally light for their size - they're just smaller.
  • The original Escape model was the 17 Foot, and it is has never been dropped from production. You can still buy one with the same waiting time as other models, at a lower price than any other model.
  • Even the Escape 21 Foot is still modest in size compared to the range of sizes from other brands of conventionally towed travel trailers.
  • The Escape 5.0TA is the largest and heaviest Escape offering ever made, and yet is the lightest and smallest fifth-wheel travel trailer sold in North America.
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Old 02-20-2016, 03:14 PM   #46
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I have thought a few times that a more powerful vehicle might make sense, but the comfort of our Highlander is important, and if it means going a little slower in the Rockies then so be it. Most of the time we're not climbing mountains.
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Old 02-20-2016, 03:19 PM   #47
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Originally Posted by emers382 View Post
I cannot really comment on whether they are built better, however we are glad we ended up getting an F-150 to tow our 5.0 "classic." We originally planned to get a Tacoma or Frontier. I have no worries about power to tow, have been over a few minor passes in NM and AZ (we're now in Tucson) and the mileage is little reduced towing from non-towing. I felt confident the other day to tow about 40 minutes into Tucson without trailer brakes (problem with controller - getting it fixed here), hardly felt any different stopping I just left a little extra room ahead of me

Adrian
Something to share . Linda reminded me of her daughter and her Ford Expedition . No towing ever, just kids . Know it is a truck under the SUV which means more weight then regular pickup . Don't forget the stuff you can put in there , more weight . To make a long story short -brakes constantly needing to be replaced . The point being for that peculiar SUV , so much weight to stop ,brakes failing because of that weight I would think . Hope Ford is using better brakes today . Brakes being able to stop kind of important . I own a Ford truck , always have .Looks to me you need to keep moving up today to get what you use to get . I also noticed those who think you can go small , most have big trucks including the owner . Make your own conclusions . Just be safe for yourself and everyone around you . Pat
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Old 02-20-2016, 03:27 PM   #48
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Originally Posted by Old Skool View Post
Just a thought, to stir the pot. For the 5th wheel and 21 owners out there. Are the “Heavy Duty” trucks built better? Maybe I just got lucky but my current vehicle is still rock solid after 13 years of use. My neighbor is running a 12-year-old 2500 duramax and after hauling a goose neck trailer up and down the Mcarthy Road on countless trips is still in excellent shape. I’m kind of sold on the “Heavy Duties” for longevity.!
I would be very disappointed in a vehicle of any size and type which was not still rock solid after only 12 or 13 years (assuming no significant collisions)... expectations vary.

I don't know of any reason to expect a "heavy-duty" pickup to be any built any better than any other size of pickup. Also, a "heavy duty" truck is much larger than any pickup - all pickups (like anything sensible for towing an Escape) are just light trucks.

Anyway, the difference between the "half-ton" class (Chev/GMC 1500, Ram 1500, Ford F-150, Toyota anything, Nissan anything) and the "3/4 ton" class (Chev/GMC 2500, Ram 2500, Ford F-250) is just component size. Vehicles designed for higher loads have stronger parts (bigger frames, larger axles, bigger cooling system, etc) but there is no reason for any difference in quality. The same engineers and accountants at Ford who spec'd an inadequate swaybar end link that failed on my Focus also spec'd the inadequate front-end parts which disintegrate on F-SuperDuty pickups... and in both cases most of the rest of the vehicle is fine.

The bigger pickups have their frequent mechanical failures like any other vehicle... but more expensively. Of course, if you buy a truck designed to carry a ton and tow ten tons, then use it as a commuter car (as many of them are), it should last better than a truck designed to carry half a ton and tow five tons but used right to its limit.
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Old 02-20-2016, 03:29 PM   #49
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Originally Posted by Brian B-P View Post
Hmm... but when my minivan and 17-foot trailer have encountered diesel pickups and their trailers on mountain grades, I'm always the one doing the passing. Since my minivan is over a decade old, it is behind the times and has much less engine power than current offerings.
Brian, out of all of the cars and trucks that I have owned over the years, the Dodge Caravan that I used to haul my old tent camper was my favorite. Scott

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Old 02-20-2016, 03:34 PM   #50
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Originally Posted by Brian B-P View Post
I suppose, then, that every commercial truck (the "big rigs", "semis", or whatever you want to call real Class 8 trucks with tens of tons of trailer) is a hazard... because they are all snail-slow up a significant grade compared to our rigs, since they don't have the thousands of horsepower they would need to keep up.


That seems to be the theme of many of these "get a big truck" topics. By the way, that 500 hp Mack is slow up a hill compared to a 300 hp SUV, because the Mack weighs so much (8 to 10 tons).


Hmm... but when my minivan and 17-foot trailer have encountered diesel pickups and their trailers on mountain grades, I'm always the one doing the passing. Since my minivan is over a decade old, it is behind the times and has much less engine power than current offerings.
Brian having truckers in the family . I know stay away from big trucks including semi 's . They lose their brakes all the time . What do you think the runaway ramps are for ? Pat
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