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Old 03-07-2015, 09:04 AM   #141
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Interesting. So maybe it's not that a turbo benefits from getting up to speed quicker, but non-turbo as well.



I was taught to exert just enough pressure on the accelerator to gain momentum but to pretend one has an egg under their foot (I realize we are towing an egg also) and use just enough pressure without breaking the egg. Gentle versus hard pressure when starting from stop is the best way to drive economically.
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Old 03-07-2015, 09:25 AM   #142
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Originally Posted by cpaharley2008 View Post
Interesting. So maybe it's not that a turbo benefits from getting up to speed quicker, but non-turbo as well.



I was taught to exert just enough pressure on the accelerator to gain momentum but to pretend one has an egg under their foot (I realize we are towing an egg also) and use just enough pressure without breaking the egg. Gentle versus hard pressure when starting from stop is the best way to drive economically.
I kind of attacked towing the way that I've driven hybrids for the last 8 years. That's how I average 43 mpg in a car rated 31 - 36 mpg. Towing the Escape, my wife and I would challenge each other to see who could get better mpg. We definitely enjoyed driving on the west coast where the speed limit was 55 when towing.
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Old 03-07-2015, 11:55 AM   #143
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.... . I remember in the past problems with spark plugs in aluminum . ......
This is the second time recently I've seen a reference to this problem on the Escape forum, so I think it's worthy of a comment.

The problem (at least in the past when I worked extensively on aluminum engines) is that not all spark plugs, physically, are the same.
Prime example: Bosch and NGK spark plugs are identical in thread pitch and diameter. So, I can replace my Honda plugs with the mfr-recommended NGK's or Denso's, or I could use Bosch.
But the local parts store favorite, Champion, has a thread pitch 1° different. It will screw in, but in an aluminum block, will eventually seize. I can get it out; I can fix the cylinder head one of two ways, but you're not going to like the bill either way.
Bottom line: in aluminum engines, use only what the manufacturer recommends.
Some mfrs. recommend an anti-seize compound on the threads, some do not. Follow the mfr's recommendations.
Personally, I always use a slight amount.
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Old 03-07-2015, 01:18 PM   #144
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Good input Don, Thanks
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Old 03-07-2015, 01:27 PM   #145
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Originally Posted by dfandrews View Post
This is the second time recently I've seen a reference to this problem on the Escape forum, so I think it's worthy of a comment.

The problem (at least in the past when I worked extensively on aluminum engines) is that not all spark plugs, physically, are the same.
Prime example: Bosch and NGK spark plugs are identical in thread pitch and diameter. So, I can replace my Honda plugs with the mfr-recommended NGK's or Denso's, or I could use Bosch.
But the local parts store favorite, Champion, has a thread pitch 1° different. It will screw in, but in an aluminum block, will eventually seize. I can get it out; I can fix the cylinder head one of two ways, but you're not going to like the bill either way.
Bottom line: in aluminum engines, use only what the manufacturer recommends.
Some mfrs. recommend an anti-seize compound on the threads, some do not. Follow the mfr's recommendations.
Personally, I always use a slight amount.
I appreciate the insight as to spark plugs and aluminum engines, but maybe I'm missing something. Ford's 2.7L Ecoboost V6 has compacted graphite iron pistons and a cast iron block -- similar to most turbo-diesel engines. Are you talking about the aluminum alloy heads?
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Old 03-07-2015, 03:57 PM   #146
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What scares me is when I read not all trucks being able to tow .What would I want a truck for then ?
Every truck can tow - the question is how much. Lots of people have trucks and never tow with them - some carry cargo in the box, and some just like the size and style of trucks rather than sedans or station wagons (SUVs); you and I would not be interested in a truck not set up for towing, but many others are.

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I really don't like engine not being steel either . The body I can live with . I remember in the past problems with spark plugs in aluminum .
I assume you meant the engine block and heads in cast iron - I don't think steel was ever used for these components - but I get the idea. Aluminum certainly was a durability concern many years ago, but is normal now. All but one vehicle I've owned has had aluminum heads, and I've never had an issue with any of them. For heads specifically, I think it would be hard to find any current production engine from any manufacturer with iron heads - they're just too heavy.

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What if you bought a used truck down the line and no one is clear whether it is really set up for towing.
This is a concern with many types of vehicle. For instance, I have a Toyota Sienna van, and on that model in the U.S. the towing preparation package is optional - used buyers have no way to tell if it has the package without checking the VIN with the manufacturer.

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I know for years now trucks need to be camper certified or you can't put a camper on . In the old days you had a truck and put the camper on and away you went . Now all trucks are not the same trans , radiator, brakes , etc .so you need a camper certified to put that camper on .
I'm pretty sure that trucks have always had a range of equipment choices; certainly for decades not all trucks of the same model had the same capability. I remember seeing crew cab Chevrolet pickups from the 1970's with a factory "camper special" badge: these were equipped with a long box specific equipment to be suitable to haul a camper, and the four-door cab had space for a family.
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Old 03-07-2015, 03:59 PM   #147
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Originally Posted by cpaharley2008 View Post
I was taught to exert just enough pressure on the accelerator to gain momentum but to pretend one has an egg under their foot (I realize we are towing an egg also) and use just enough pressure without breaking the egg. Gentle versus hard pressure when starting from stop is the best way to drive economically.
I think we were both taught to drive in an era when cars (and trucks) had carburetors and automatic transmissions had hydraulic control systems. Things have changed...
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Old 03-07-2015, 04:17 PM   #148
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I do not believe that the problems with seized and spark plugs blown out of the engine apply to the ecoboost engines. But, I have been retired for two years and do not have access to the latest technical service bulletins. The seized plugs were a result of several threads of the spark plug projecting into the combustion chamber and were subjected to carbon buildup. The spark plugs that were blown out of the engine was a result of the counter bevel machined into the cylinder head which did not match the bevel of the spark plug which then became loose. Ford has since fixed both problems. Steel spark plugs threaded into aluminum blocks and cylinder heads has always been a problem due to dissimilar metals. The problem became more problematic when the manufactures recommended replacement at 100K miles.
If you use anti-seize on the spark plug threads use it sparingly, just a dab. Anti-seize can change the thermal characteristics of the spark plug (heat range).
"use only what the manufacturer recommends". This is very good advise even though Iridium spark plugs are expensive.
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Old 03-08-2015, 12:37 AM   #149
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I think we were both taught to drive in an era when cars (and trucks) had carburetors and automatic transmissions had hydraulic control systems. Things have changed...
That's why I like this forum .great information . I always want to learn . I guess when you get older we still long for the simplicity we are losing daily . Like and use new technology but can't help remember what use to be .
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Old 03-08-2015, 01:04 AM   #150
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I guess when you get older we still long for the simplicity we are losing daily .
I feel some of that, too. One minor reason for the manual transmission in my current car is that the much greater complexity of the automatic seems like a risk of an expensive rebuild (which I won't be able to do) somewhere down the line. On the other hand, I would rather have the fuel injection systems that run my current engines with no maintenance work and no attention than the not-so-simple carburetors that I dealt with on previous vehicles.

We used to drive a Triumph Spitfire and my wife and I could both adjust the ignition points. The simplicity was nice, but now the electronic ignition systems just work for the whole life of the car with no attention - and since distributors are no longer used, they're actually mechanically simpler than the Spitfire's system. Of course, the new ones have a pile of unrepairable electronic complexity.

A challenge for me is deciding what technology is worth understanding, and what should just be used without worrying about how it works... because it just works.
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