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Old 02-17-2015, 04:57 PM   #51
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Make sure you check your owners manual . There is often a break in period before you are supposed to tow with the vehicle and your speeds are limited during the first XXX miles of towing . I was told for my new 2014 truck not to tow until I had 1000 miles on the vehicle and limit my speed to 55 MPH for the first 500 miles of towing. I do not know if Ford has similar requirements but it' s worth a look.
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Old 02-17-2015, 05:07 PM   #52
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Make sure you check your owners manual . There is often a break in period before you are supposed to tow with the vehicle and your speeds are limited during the first XXX miles of towing . I was told for my new 2014 truck not to tow until I had 1000 miles on the vehicle and limit my speed to 55 MPH for the first 500 miles of towing. I do not know if Ford has similar requirements but it' s worth a look.
Good points. The break in period for the tires is 300 miles, in which you're supposed to vary your speed and not exceed the speed limit. No problem there, since we plan to take our time anyway. The break in period for the engine (to properly seat the rings, bearings, etc) before towing is 1000 miles, in which you're also supposed to vary your speed and rpm's, although there is no mention of not going over 55 mph. Again, not a problem, since it's almost 2300 miles to Chilliwack from here. The engine should have already passed it's initial break in period before we get there.
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Old 02-17-2015, 07:28 PM   #53
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Robert , I have read on several forums plus I was told by my local Ford dealer that Ford recommends the use of premium fuel when using the Eco Boost engine for towing. In our area premium fuel is 60 cents/ gallon or 25% more than regular . With every truck mfg. bragging that they are the fuel economy champs ,it gets confusing. I have often wondered if fuel cost per mile of towing might be a better standard than MPG. In my case my Ram Hemi uses 89 octane fuel which often comes at a 20 to 40 cents per gallon premium . I think you made a great choice in purchasing a F 150 ,just looking for information
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Old 02-17-2015, 08:15 PM   #54
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Robert , I have read on several forums plus I was told by my local Ford dealer that Ford recommends the use of premium fuel when using the Eco Boost engine for towing.
It would be interesting to know if this is for reliability or driveability (due to reduced knock), or just for more power availability (since the engine can use more boost with higher octane). It should be in the owner's manual...

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In our area premium fuel is 60 cents/ gallon or 25% more than regular.
...
I have often wondered if fuel cost per mile of towing might be a better standard than MPG. In my case my Ram Hemi uses 89 octane fuel which often comes at a 20 to 40 cents per gallon premium .
Excellent point... since regular gasoline, premium gasoline, and diesel fuel all have different prices. Even if the EcoBoost-equipped truck gets better fuel economy with premium (and I don't think a significant difference is likely), the fuel price difference will probably kill any economic advantage.

I never buy premium fuel, in part because I avoid vehicles which need it. I got lucky with my current (non-towing) car, because I forgot to check and despite the 13.0:1 compression ratio, it runs on regular 87-octane.
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Old 02-17-2015, 08:50 PM   #55
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Robert , I have read on several forums plus I was told by my local Ford dealer that Ford recommends the use of premium fuel when using the Eco Boost engine for towing. In our area premium fuel is 60 cents/ gallon or 25% more than regular . With every truck mfg. bragging that they are the fuel economy champs ,it gets confusing. I have often wondered if fuel cost per mile of towing might be a better standard than MPG. In my case my Ram Hemi uses 89 octane fuel which often comes at a 20 to 40 cents per gallon premium . I think you made a great choice in purchasing a F 150 ,just looking for information
Yes, I'm familiar with the "manufacturer recommends premium fuel" argument for various vehicles. Personally, I think the evidence is pretty dramatic that in most cases it's not worth it. You "might" be able to squeeze a few extra ponies out of the engine on a dyno by using high octane, but today's modern engines and computer systems already have sensors that compensate for different octane levels. I don't give octane a second thought, and I have had zero issues by burning regular. I have owned a Mazdaspeed Turbo MX-5 since 2004, and the fuel filler door has big bold letters that say "premium fuel only". Guess what? I've only burned regular, and it runs like a top -- for 11 years now.
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Old 02-17-2015, 09:16 PM   #56
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The speed that we drive is a huge factor in the mileage we get. Remember 55 mph in the 70's. In running 70 to 75 mph with the 5.3 engine and the 3.73 rear end, I got 20 mpg shown by the computer and also figuring it the old fashioned way. I would bring it down to 60 mph for 40 or 50 miles and the mileage would jump up to between 25 and 27 mph. I don't know what speed will work best pulling the trailer but I was thinking in the 65 mph range. At what speeds do a lot of you trailer owners tow? Loren
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Old 02-17-2015, 09:19 PM   #57
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I try to hold to 90 KPH ( 56 MPH ), but sometimes it's just safer to drive the speed of traffic, whatever that may be.
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Old 02-17-2015, 09:36 PM   #58
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Hi Loren- our experience towing is that 55-62 mph is the sweet spot for towing mileage-wise. Remember that in some states like CA 55 mph is the limit when towing anything.
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Old 02-17-2015, 09:36 PM   #59
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Higher octane fuels are necessary for turbo boosted gas engines. Low octane fuels result in predetonation during boost. The power control module responds to input from the knock sensors and regards timing and boost to minimize the chance of damage to the engine pistons due to predetonation. Retarded timing and and reduced boost result in lower horse power.It would be wise to follow the octane recommendations of the manufacturer particularly when towing and hauling under load to avoid engine failure. The higher fuel mileage of the ecoboost engines is only achieved when the turbo is not engaged. Higher octane fuels do not provide more energy and better mileage but are more resistant to predetonation.
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Old 02-17-2015, 09:48 PM   #60
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Right on! And....any Newbie w/ any turbo would be well advised to remember to idle the engine for 1-2 minutes after any hard running to avoid coking the bearings. My buddy just spent over $3K to replace his F350 diesel turbo at 90K.
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