kia sorento, 2016 - Page 4 - Escape Trailer Owners Community

Go Back   Escape Trailer Owners Community > Escape Tech > Towing and Hitching
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-02-2015, 02:36 PM   #31
Senior Member
 
Bobbito's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Surrey, British Columbia
Trailer: 2015 Escape 21
Posts: 549
Drive train, and especially the transmission, is a huge factor when towing with a vehicle other than a truck or SUV built to tow. We had a Dodge Grand Caravan that was rated to tow 3500 lbs, and all we towed was a tent trailer. When the transmission shop was rebuilding our transmission for the second time they took me into the shop and showed me the problem. The disks in the automatic transmission were very small in comparison to those in a truck or large SUV. They showed me the disks from a GM Safari to point out that some vans DID have better transmissions, in fact they were pretty well the same size as the disks from a truck. I think you would be taking quite a chance if you tow your trailer based only on the manufacturer's specs. Dodge's specs were fine, but the drive train wasn't built for towing. So, even if the vehicle is capable of towing the trailer, how will it impact the drive train long term? And having adequate tongue weight (10% of trailer) is important for stability, but at the same time may put you over your payload limit. Sorry for the negative spin, but better to be forewarned. The salesmen I have dealt with have never given me a good picture of what their vehicles can safely tow and carry.

Bob K
__________________

Bobbito is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2015, 08:09 PM   #32
Senior Member
 
skiman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Jeromesville, Ohio
Trailer: Escape 21' pulled with 2014 Silverado Crewcab
Posts: 588
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobbito View Post
Drive train, and especially the transmission, is a huge factor when towing with a vehicle other than a truck or SUV built to tow. We had a Dodge Grand Caravan that was rated to tow 3500 lbs, and all we towed was a tent trailer. When the transmission shop was rebuilding our transmission for the second time they took me into the shop and showed me the problem. The disks in the automatic transmission were very small in comparison to those in a truck or large SUV. They showed me the disks from a GM Safari to point out that some vans DID have better transmissions, in fact they were pretty well the same size as the disks from a truck. I think you would be taking quite a chance if you tow your trailer based only on the manufacturer's specs. Dodge's specs were fine, but the drive train wasn't built for towing. So, even if the vehicle is capable of towing the trailer, how will it impact the drive train long term? And having adequate tongue weight (10% of trailer) is important for stability, but at the same time may put you over your payload limit. Sorry for the negative spin, but better to be forewarned. The salesmen I have dealt with have never given me a good picture of what their vehicles can safely tow and carry.

Bob K
Safari and Astro vans had the same trans as the V8's. Not much power but the V-6 was a chopped off small block and did a nice job. Also had a full frame.
__________________

__________________
Carl,

"Isn't it amazing how much stuff we get done the day before vacation?"
Zig Ziglar
skiman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2015, 10:42 PM   #33
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Trailer: 1979 Boler B1700
Posts: 9,036
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiman View Post
Safari and Astro vans...
Also had a full frame.
No, the Astro/Safari has a stub frame just in the front, like some other old GM designs such as an early Camaro or Nova. I think that frame ends somewhere around the rear transmission mount; the rear suspension and towing hitch mount to the unitized body/frame structure. It also had the front suspension of a full-size car (not a truck or SUV). Nothing to do with transmission reliability or the Kia Sorrento, but another example of how there are multiple workable design solutions to the same service requirement.
Brian B-P is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2015, 10:44 PM   #34
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Trailer: 1979 Boler B1700
Posts: 9,036
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobbito View Post
The salesmen I have dealt with have never given me a good picture of what their vehicles can safely tow and carry.
Same here - sales staff are good sources of pricing and availability information, but otherwise generally useless.
Brian B-P is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2015, 07:59 AM   #35
Senior Member
 
skiman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Jeromesville, Ohio
Trailer: Escape 21' pulled with 2014 Silverado Crewcab
Posts: 588
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian B-P View Post
No, the Astro/Safari has a stub frame just in the front, like some other old GM designs such as an early Camaro or Nova. I think that frame ends somewhere around the rear transmission mount; the rear suspension and towing hitch mount to the unitized body/frame structure. It also had the front suspension of a full-size car (not a truck or SUV). Nothing to do with transmission reliability or the Kia Sorrento, but another example of how there are multiple workable design solutions to the same service requirement.
Your correct. Been 20 years since I had one. I remember now having to replace two weld studs on the hitch receiver that snapped off from stress of equalizing hitch. Had to through bolt them.
__________________

__________________
Carl,

"Isn't it amazing how much stuff we get done the day before vacation?"
Zig Ziglar
skiman is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off






» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:03 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2012 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.