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Old 11-13-2019, 12:28 PM   #1
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Tesla truck to revolutionize RV towing?

https://www.anonews.co/tesla-announc...balJRTX5R3xr90

If the preliminary specs of the newly-announced Tesla pickup truck are even close to true, Elon Musk's EV will be a game-changer for those of us who tow a bumper-pull or 5th wheel trailer. And the sub-$50,000 USD price is competitive with the cost of a current gas and diesel trucks.

Imagine having torque that surpasses any fossil fuel powered truck, and spending a few dollars per trip for energy rather than several hundred. With far fewer moving parts, EVs require less maintenance, and new features can be added during every firmware update.

Immediately, campground owners could install some recharging connections, and add to them as more RVers switch to Teslas, the coming Ford F-150 electric, or other EV trucks. Roadside charging stations could add some longer lanes to accommodate EV trucks that has a trailer in tow.

I for one will enjoy camping more when the guilt about the big carbon footprint of my gas-guzzling truck is gone. Is anyone else looking forward to this revolution?
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Old 11-13-2019, 12:37 PM   #2
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Hi Brent
I would have thought your comment was off base and way in the future a few years ago. However, when I parked in a lot next to an Arby’s fast food business in Sterling Colorado a couple years ago and there was line of charging stations with two Tesla’s hooked up I became a lot less of a skeptic. I see a Tesla every once in a while on the highway, especially in the Chicago area. They pass me just like everyone else as they mutter something about a doddering old codger.
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Old 11-13-2019, 01:25 PM   #3
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Where are you going to charge it at forestry sites in the interior, or on the Island? Do I have to bring my generator with me, and a can of gas?
Recent story on TV was about a couple who drove their EV to the cabin. They didn't count on a power failure and couldn't get out for several days, until power was restored.
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Old 11-13-2019, 01:36 PM   #4
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Do I have to bring my generator with me, and a can of gas?
A propane-fired generator might be a good idea when towing with the Tesla to remote areas.
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Old 11-13-2019, 01:41 PM   #5
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Rivian also building a very compelling E-Truck w/ deliveries to commence in 2020.

https://rivian.com/

I was just recently lamenting the fact that there aren't even PHEV tow vehicles that could get you around town with a 25 mile or so battery. I would have expected something like that to come out before a full blown electric solution since you still get off the grid unleaded range. No complaints though! These are exciting times!
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Old 11-13-2019, 01:53 PM   #6
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Range management

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Originally Posted by gbaglo View Post
Where are you going to charge it at forestry sites in the interior, or on the Island? Do I have to bring my generator with me, and a can of gas?
Recent story on TV was about a couple who drove their EV to the cabin. They didn't count on a power failure and couldn't get out for several days, until power was restored.
EV charging sites are proliferating, the range of EVs is increasing, and doubtless there are breakthroughs to come. An EV truck owner would just have to do the math for each trip. Drivers worried about range could bring along a generator in their EV, or keep towing with their current gas or diesel unit.
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Old 11-13-2019, 01:58 PM   #7
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The technological advances that are still to come or at least be revealed may well take the “stranded” factor away from the dead battery scenario. Even the old Honda motorcycles of the 60’s had a reserve side to their fuel tanks. And I’m sure there were similar earlier provisions. I could see satellite communication locating the vehicle, remaining charge and location of the nearest operable charging site with a built in cushion. Assuming the operator would pay attention and heed the low charge warning, being stranded would be averted.
Who knows what the future holds?
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Old 11-13-2019, 02:23 PM   #8
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The technological advances that are still to come or at least be revealed may well take the “stranded” factor away from the dead battery scenario. Even the old Honda motorcycles of the 60’s had a reserve side to their fuel tanks. And I’m sure there were similar earlier provisions. I could see satellite communication locating the vehicle, remaining charge and location of the nearest operable charging site with a built in cushion. Assuming the operator would pay attention and heed the low charge warning, being stranded would be averted.
Who knows what the future holds?
Iowa Dave
Hi: Iowa Dave... Which came first, the electric car or the charging station? What would your daddy think of them? Alf
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Old 11-13-2019, 02:46 PM   #9
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The old days

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Hi: Iowa Dave... Which came first, the electric car or the charging station? What would your daddy think of them? Alf
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Hi Alf
My Dad would have probably taken it all in stride. He was well aware of Electric cars of the early part of the 20th century, the garages with turntables since they often didn’t have a reverse, wind chargers for Model T coils etc. Straffed by an early NAZI jet aircraft in Germany he watched it hit the treetops and disintegrate. He’d later tell me “man she was fast all right but the pilot was a little late pulling up”. How amazing to think that his grandson has done cockpit display work on the Lockheed X59 QueSst supersonic plane that will fly at Mach 1.42 without a windshield and with a very low sonic “thump” as it glides by. Times change but one constant is that my dad and I and my son all enjoy(d) the out of doors and a shot of good bourbon whiskey. The beat goes on. Hope you’re having a great fall and looking forward to a good winter.
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Old 11-13-2019, 03:05 PM   #10
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I for one will enjoy camping more when the guilt about the big carbon footprint of my gas-guzzling truck is gone. Is anyone else looking forward to this revolution?
How do you think that electric is created to recharge these vehicles? Crossing Wyoming I witnessed a huge strip mine on the left side of the highway with conveyors of coal under the highway to a large coal burning electric generating plant on the opposite side of the highway.....you may not see it, but the carbon footprints are there for electric vehicles. Solar and wind provides something less than 20% of our energy use currently.
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Old 11-13-2019, 03:40 PM   #11
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EVs seem to be pretty durable as well. That makes sense since they have few moving parts, but even so this is impressive:

https://qz.com/1737145/the-economics...=pocket-newtab

I may have to start taking these things seriously. Well, maybe in a few years. And probably not for towing.
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Old 11-13-2019, 05:12 PM   #12
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A propane-fired generator might be a good idea when towing with the Tesla to remote areas.
Do you want to carry enough fuel to run the generator enough to charge the Tesla's battery enough to get out?

My thinking is that if you want to drive on energy from plugging in, either get a hybrid, or get a battery-electric vehicle but stay within range of a known charging source.
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Old 11-13-2019, 05:21 PM   #13
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How do you think that electric is created to recharge these vehicles? Crossing Wyoming I witnessed a huge strip mine on the left side of the highway with conveyors of coal under the highway to a large coal burning electric generating plant on the opposite side of the highway.....you may not see it, but the carbon footprints are there for electric vehicles. Solar and wind provides something less than 20% of our energy use currently.
But the largest source of electricity in many areas is hydroelectric generation - 60% of all electrical energy in Canada and similar in some areas of the U.S.. In half of Canadian provinces, with a large majority of the nation's population, fossil fuels (coal, gas, oil) supply a small to negligible fraction of energy to the electrical grid.

There are consequences to all energy sources, but it is not valid to assume that using electricity means running a coal-fired generating station.
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Old 11-13-2019, 05:27 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by Catchlight View Post
https://www.anonews.co/tesla-announc...balJRTX5R3xr90

If the preliminary specs of the newly-announced Tesla pickup truck are even close to true, Elon Musk's EV will be a game-changer for those of us who tow a bumper-pull or 5th wheel trailer. And the sub-$50,000 USD price is competitive with the cost of a current gas and diesel trucks.
Unfortunately, what Musk promises is rarely true. If the promised cost or performance is delivered, it is years after it was supposed to be available. If you doubt this, try to find someone who actually bought a Tesla Model 3 for $35K USD... ever, let alone when the Model 3 was introduced.

A more realistic idea of what the coming EV pickups will be like comes from Rivian, who has actually built and shown prototypes. The price is much higher, and range while towing a travel trailer will be disappointing to most people.
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Old 11-13-2019, 06:02 PM   #15
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But the largest source of electricity in many areas is hydroelectric generation - 60% of all electrical energy in Canada and similar in some areas of the U.S.. In half of Canadian provinces, with a large majority of the nation's population, fossil fuels (coal, gas, oil) supply a small to negligible fraction of energy to the electrical grid.

There are consequences to all energy sources, but it is not valid to assume that using electricity means running a coal-fired generating station.
Not to argue, but the worlds energy consumption is 90% fossil fuels, coal, gas, oil with hydro, solar and other making up the difference. Canada maybe ahead of the US and elsewhere with hydroelectric. What ever happened to atomic energy, it was really big post WWII but they seem to be shutting down,
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Old 11-13-2019, 06:42 PM   #16
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The pickup trucks are going to be a very nice addition to EV lineups. They are approaching 4-500 range on some models, with about a 30 minute recharge capability. Most FT only drive about 200-300 mi per day on travel days, so these EV pickups cud work well.
I’d definitely look at that option when our Frontier is ready to change out in a couple of years.
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Old 11-13-2019, 07:28 PM   #17
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Not to argue, but the worlds energy consumption is 90% fossil fuels, coal, gas, oil with hydro, solar and other making up the difference. Canada maybe ahead of the US and elsewhere with hydroelectric.
Right... but we're not talking about a tow vehicle for Africa.

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What ever happened to atomic energy, it was really big post WWII but they seem to be shutting down
The province of Ontario and some areas of the U.S. use largely nuclear generation, with stations that were mostly built decades ago. Getting approval for one now would be difficult, and older stations have reached the end of their service lives and have been decommissioned. The Daiichi stations which failed in Fukushima Japan will not be replaced with more nuclear plants; they're even planning wind and solar installations on the contaminated farmland.
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Old 11-13-2019, 07:30 PM   #18
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The pickup trucks are going to be a very nice addition to EV lineups. They are approaching 4-500 range on some models, with about a 30 minute recharge capability. Most FT only drive about 200-300 mi per day on travel days, so these EV pickups cud work well.
I’d definitely look at that option when our Frontier is ready to change out in a couple of years.
Good points, but now divide the range by two for towing, and they suddenly look marginal.

In a couple of years I don't think an EV pickup will be a realistic option yet, but it could happen.
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Old 11-13-2019, 07:32 PM   #19
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A more realistic idea of what the coming EV pickups will be like comes from Rivian, who has actually built and shown prototypes.
I should have noted that I would not be surprised if Rivian never actually sells their pickup and SUV to the public, but becomes only a component supplier to Ford and others, and perhaps a commercial vehicle manufacturer.
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Old 11-13-2019, 08:20 PM   #20
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press on new battery technology

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...arging-it.html
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