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Old 06-15-2015, 11:32 PM   #31
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Two spares for the trailer, two for the truck?
Or, if you set up the truck and trailer to use compatible wheels and tires, maybe only two or three in total. Yes, I know that it's tough to find something that works for both, but it's possible with some tugs. It's almost easy with a Ford Ranger.

Just something to think about for fun...
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Old 06-16-2015, 01:16 PM   #32
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All good replies guys.

My question is, is there any advantage to getting say, a ten ply tire (durable??) for those conditions, or just go w what you brung?
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Old 06-16-2015, 01:19 PM   #33
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http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tirete...jsp?techid=219
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Old 06-16-2015, 01:22 PM   #34
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Thanks Robert.

So looks like some 10plys for the TV might be a reasonable purchase.
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Old 06-16-2015, 11:58 PM   #35
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All good replies guys.

My question is, is there any advantage to getting say, a ten ply tire (durable??) for those conditions, or just go w what you brung?
There are no highway tires which actually have ten plies of reinforcement, since modern tire construction (radial or even bias-belted) does not require the large numbers of plies needed in antique non-belted bias ply designs. The "ten ply" term now corresponds to a load range (which is capacity relative to a "standard" tire of the same size).
  • 2-ply Load Range A (typically 24 psi max, and long obsolete)
  • 4-ply Load Range B (typically 32 to 44 psi max; normal for passenger cars and the lightest light trucks; roughly equivalent to Standard Load)
  • 6-ply Load Range C (typically 50 psi max; now common for RV trailers and light trucks; roughly equivalent to Extra Load)
  • 8-ply Load Range D (typically 65 psi max)
  • 10-ply Load Range E (typically 80 psi max)
The pressures I listed are just a general guide and are not consistent; they depend on tire size and type (e.g. P versus ST versus LT versus commercial).

The actual number of plies may be very small. My motorhome's tires (an RV-specific tread with the construction of a heavy commercial truck tire, Load Range G) run at up to 110 PSI and each one alone could carry my entire van; they have only a single ply of steel cord in the sidewall (plus belts under the tread). The steel "cord" (cable) is just thicker than used with the lower pressures of lower-capacity tires.

Damage to the sidewalls of the tire from hazards such as sharp rocks has about as much to do with the rubber on the sidewall as the cords behind it. Off-road enthusiasts have tires with ridges of extra rubber for this purpose, which do nothing to support the load and are only there for protection. There is even a reason to avoid extra cord plies: more stuff in the sidewalls means more rolling resistance and heat buildup for the same inflation pressure.

In short, a higher ply rating means a higher load range and generally more sidewall strength, but is not entirely desirable and may not say much about resistance to damage from road hazards.

If I wanted to reduce the change of flats on the trailer due to road hazards, rather than choose a Special Trailer (ST) tire of a higher load range I would probably look for a Light Truck (LT) tire specifically designed to handle off-road or rough-road use.
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Old 06-17-2015, 12:03 AM   #36
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So looks like some 10plys for the TV might be a reasonable purchase.
The link has some good information, but without any explanation of load ranges or any mention of ply ratings, I don't see how the linked material would lead to the conclusion that tires with a 10-ply rating would be advisable. LT tires for a truck or van: yes. Adequate load range: yes. Excessive load range: I don't see it.
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Old 06-17-2015, 12:09 AM   #37
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Another factor to consider - I replaced those killer Firestones on my Explorer with Yokohama Geolander Light Truck tires hoping for more puncture resistance. ( paid extra, and the tire store wrote that they were passenger tires on the invoice to satisfy the recall requirements ).
They were incredibly loud and got louder as they wore. When I replaced them I was amazed that I could suddenly hear the radio and the engine revving.
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Old 06-17-2015, 12:35 AM   #38
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Yes, there is quite a range of tread patterns on Light Truck tires, and some of them are very noisy. Unfortunately the quiet tread patterns will be the "highway" types and the ones with the most sidewall protection probably have "off road" (meaning coarse and loud) tread patterns.
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Old 06-17-2015, 04:40 PM   #39
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OK, my final comment after driving the "top of the world"/Taylor highway is: Full size spare for sure, second wouldn't be unreasonable and also a can of inflation goo as well as a patch kit.

Made it to the border into Alaska from Dawson Creek, road gravel but not too bad, then nice paved road which gave me false hopes, then nasty rock. Got a truck puncture about 10 miles before Chicken, used my 12 volt compressor twice to get the tire inflated, very little shoulder and wouldn't have tried to jack up the truck anyway. Bought a repair kit in Chicken and patched it. Had one at home but even the $30 seemed like a bargain in those circumstances. Finished the rest of the highway to Tok and now I'm off to the tire store to have a proper patch put on the tire.

So I think the bottom line is if you're going off the Alaska highway take be prepared to deal with a flat when there's no AAA around.

Ron
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Old 06-17-2015, 05:07 PM   #40
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We always carry 2 spares. But, we have a 5th wheel. We also spend a lot of time in the wilds where getting a new tire would be problematical. With a dual axle trailer, if one tire goes, it can take out the other.
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