Tow a 17B with 3500 lb tow capacity ?? - Page 5 - Escape Trailer Owners Community

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Old 08-25-2015, 11:00 AM   #41
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I found that my Tekonsha brake controller needs to be re-calibrated after brake servicing. The ideal setting seems to depend on how loose the the shoes are in the drum.
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Old 08-25-2015, 11:01 AM   #42
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Descending long grades

The takeaways I wholeheartedly agree with from this discussion are
1. Keep your brakes on your trailer adjusted and have your controller set up to do the job it needs to do when it needs to do it. Brakes can easily be replaced, it costs money to go racing, I always say.
2. Don't wait until you feel like a rolling cannonball to regain an appropriate speed. Start early on the descent and don't get in a hurry.
3. Don't be afraid to use the transmission to keep your speed down. Buzzing the engine to 4,000 or even 5,000 rpms should not hurt a thing on a 6,500 rpm red line engine especially if your running plenty of good oil and your cooling system is in good shape.
Of course all this is predicated on having a proper tow vehicle / trailer setup. Like many here I have towed in the hundreds of thousands of miles, towing for over 50 years now.
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Old 08-25-2015, 11:08 AM   #43
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Following your own advise should get you safely down any hill, Dave.
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Old 08-25-2015, 11:21 AM   #44
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2. Don't wait until you feel like a rolling cannonball to regain an appropriate speed. Start early on the descent and don't get in a hurry.
Dave
This is the most important to me as well. I guess because we have such big hills out west here. There are pull overs for trucks at the top of most long downhills. I have been stopping at them and waiting 5 to 10 minutes to let the brakes cool down. Get a soda out of the fridge, check the fridge for spills, etc. Then we proceed.
Traveling north on 97 in Oregon coming down the big hill to the Columbia river once I really overheated my front brakes. It ended up cracking both rotors.
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Old 08-25-2015, 11:59 AM   #45
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Big Hills and Sneaky Mountains

When I am in the west, I expect to serve due diligence to the passes and steep grades up or down. The last two years I have been in West Virginia and several other Appalachian states. They have some challenging hills down there that kind of sneak up on you and will challenge your driving skills for sure. We have both of the towing guides for east and west and we consult them to either plan our route or to remind us what we are in for that day. A proper mindset is a big part of driving too. The Honda 305 Superhawk in 1969 and the 1950
Ford f-1 with that little flathead mill conquered what is present day I-90 through Montana on the way to summer jobs in Idaho. After that it was all downhill. Pun intended
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Old 08-25-2015, 02:06 PM   #46
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Originally Posted by jxoco View Post
This is the most important to me as well. I guess because we have such big hills out west here. There are pull overs for trucks at the top of most long downhills. I have been stopping at them and waiting 5 to 10 minutes to let the brakes cool down. Get a soda out of the fridge, check the fridge for spills, etc. Then we proceed.
Traveling north on 97 in Oregon coming down the big hill to the Columbia river once I really overheated my front brakes. It ended up cracking both rotors.

This information is very helpful. Should it also be under travel warnings?
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Old 08-25-2015, 11:34 PM   #47
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I have "the other one" supplied by Escape. I believe it is a Chinese knock off of the Equalizer...
If we're talking about the Pro Series, it has none of the characteristic features of the Equal-i-zer - it's a typical two-bars-and-chains design, of the bent round bar (not trunnion) style. I believe the Pro Series offered by Escape is something like this:
Pro Series™ RB2 Wt. Dist. Kit w/#63970 Shank, 10,000 lbs. (GTW), 600 lbs. (TW)

The Equal-i-zer is different in all the details. An Equal-i-zer has two bars (like almost everything else), but uses rigid brackets instead of chains, square bars, trunnion bar pivots, and a head that clamps the bar ends for sway-damping friction.
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Old 08-25-2015, 11:45 PM   #48
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... we have such big hills out west here. There are pull overs for trucks at the top of most long downhills.
Those are the "brake check" areas, where truckers are supposed to stop and check (and adjust as necessary) their brakes. As a side effect, they need to completely stop, so there's a limit to how fast they can start down the hill. Perhaps the existence of a brake check area is a good hint to pay attention to the coming descent, even if you don't stop there.
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Old 08-26-2015, 12:10 AM   #49
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I'm trying to figure out why one would need to cool their brakes at the top of the hill.
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Old 08-26-2015, 02:25 AM   #50
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I remember my dad riding the brakes on the mustang while pulling a boat down some mountains in California we lost the brakes and started picking up speed my dad yelling hit the floor to us two kids in the back seat. Things were different then no seat belts and pulling a boat with a mustang? He also tried to pull a horse trailer with it we got where we were going but barely
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