Towing 19 or 17 with Tesla X? - Escape Trailer Owners Community

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Old 10-14-2017, 05:55 PM   #1
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Towing 19 or 17 with Tesla X?

Has anybody had experience towing an Escape 19 or 17 with a Tesla Model X? If so, does it work well? What kind of decrease in range have you seen with towing a camper this size? Thank you.
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Old 10-14-2017, 05:59 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by AnnL View Post
Has anybody had experience towing an Escape 19 or 17 with a Tesla Model X? If so, does it work well? What kind of decrease in range have you seen with towing a camper this size? Thank you.
Ann, you will probably have more luck with an online google search, as no one here has yet reported anything about that Tesla. This showed up on my search: Tesla Model X Range Impact When Towing

If you do tow with one, please post about your experiences!
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Old 10-14-2017, 06:05 PM   #3
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Thanks; it's all a fairly new field, so we will be sure to do that. Just in the planning stages now for both the X and camper. We currently have an S, and the range decreases with a rocket box or bikes on top by up to 30% with headwinds. Have heard from an X owner that their range with a tear-drop style camper was about 50-60% of normal. We also have an F-150, so can use that if the range decrease would be so great that we couldn't reach the chargers... but it sure is nice to not have to use gas if we don't have to!
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Old 10-14-2017, 06:22 PM   #4
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Ann, one serious limiting factor would be that you would always have to travel only where you could be assured of getting a charge when needed. If you ever wanted to camp in places without electricity available, you would need one heck of a lot of solar to get the Tesla back up to charge, or carry a generator large enough to recharge it.
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Old 10-14-2017, 06:30 PM   #5
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The manufacturer of a much smaller trailer (the Happier Camper HC1) posted videos about Edmund's trial of towing with a Model X, in FiberglassRV.com:
Tesla towing HC1
Tessla towing HC1 part 3
The general comment from Edmunds is that a trailer cuts range in half, but in fact that depends on multiple factors, including the size of the trailer.

The discussion of the final installment included an image of the vehicle's display, showing a consumption average over the trip of 521 Wh/mile. You can compare that to your normal highway consumption to see what the effect of this small trailer might be; for instance, if you use 350 Wh/mile normally, this is 50% more consumption and so two-thirds of the range.

One could hop from fully-serviced (50 amp) campsite to the next, as long as you don't want to drive for more than a couple of hours between sites. This seems like a horribly hobbled mode of recreational travel to me. The Edmunds video is based on the idea of using Superchargers, but those don't exist in areas which are desirable to me for travel.
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Old 10-14-2017, 06:45 PM   #6
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Thank you for those links. Yes, using an EV makes one dependent on charging availability, and does take more time. With our S, we're typically stopping every couple hours to charge for 30 min. or so - enough time to usually walk around a little bit and go to the bathroom. The number of Superchargers is increasing rapidly, but you still have to map it out and make sure it's feasible, esp if towing or carrying a load that will decrease the range. If one is staying at a campsite that has electricity, you could fully charge the car back up. For any longer backcountry trips, we'd use the F-150.
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Old 10-14-2017, 06:54 PM   #7
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I would think that the stress of worrying where and how you were going to charge the vehicle would take all the fun out of the trip. Places I camp don't have power or other services.
Even if there were chargers on the route, I can't imagine what I would do in Despair, BC for an hour and 14 minutes while 'fueling up'.
If you watch the video at the link Brian posted, there are stats at the end credits.
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Old 10-14-2017, 07:23 PM   #8
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Thanks; that goes along with the stats the TeslaX Canada folks posted with their Alto 1713 - about 50% expected range. Good to know you can take these campers off the main drag and into the backcountry! Do they handle dirt mountain roads fairly well - as long as it's not too gnarly 4WD roads?
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Old 10-14-2017, 07:24 PM   #9
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Scratch at least 90% of the National Parks from your camping futures list, unless you are one of the lucky few to get one of the few powered sites. But still, I'm curious to hear what you find out
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Old 10-14-2017, 07:45 PM   #10
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For those that own Escapes, do you feel they are fairly aerodynamic? Do you notice them much when you're towing them? What kind of mileage drop do you have when towing? Thanks
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