Towing an Escape 21: 4Runner or Tacoma? - Page 11 - Escape Trailer Owners Community

Go Back   Escape Trailer Owners Community > Escape Tech > Towing and Hitching
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-17-2014, 10:56 PM   #101
Senior Member
 
Linda's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: PNW, Washington
Trailer: 2004 Chinook Concourse (Molded fiberglass!)
Posts: 178
If we got a 21' we would want to get a full sized truck; we currently have a V-8 4-Runner, but having towed a Bigfoot (17') with a 4-Runner, we would prefer a full-sized truck for the extra width of the truck, as well as for the extra towing power. It comes down to your own expectations, as Reace told you, and after Reace heard about our frustrations with towing a Bigfoot (slightly wider than a 21' Escape), he told us that if we ordered an Escape 21', we probably wouldn't be happy towing it with our 4-Runner.

Our preference is more towing capacity rather than less, for safety and less stress on the tow vehicle.
__________________

Linda is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2014, 11:02 PM   #102
Senior Member
 
Mike Lewis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Santa Rosa County, Florida
Trailer: 2014 Escape 21
Posts: 1,372
My 2013 Tacoma has the factory towing package. Included with this is an electronic trailer sway control, which is part of the vehicle stability system. I don't know if that affects its rated towing capacity, but it might. I'd assume a 4Runner equipped with its towing package would have something similar, but I don't know.

Mike L.
__________________

Mike Lewis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2014, 10:12 AM   #103
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Boise, Idaho
Trailer: 2014 17B
Posts: 49
One this to think about too is where you live and what elevations you are driving at while towing. Those back east will not have much of an issue. We live at 3000ft and generally go up from there. Here is a chart for the 4runner:.

Lost HP New HP Elevation
8.1 261.9 1000
16.2 253.8 2000
24.3 245.7 3000
32.4 237.6 4000
40.5 229.5 5000
48.6 221.4 6000
56.7 213.3 7000
64.8 205.2 8000
72.9 197.1 9000
81 189 10000
smilycook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2014, 12:59 PM   #104
Site Team
 
cpaharley2008's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: York, Pennsylvania
Trailer: 2016 2ndGen Escape 19' PRAIRIE SCHOONER pulled by 2014 Ram Hemi/8sp
Posts: 13,655
Wow, any higher and you might be flying…. never realized the impact, would a supercharger alleviate the thinner air
__________________
Jim
The two most important days in your life are the day you were born and the day you find out why………..Mark Twain
cpaharley2008 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2014, 01:33 PM   #105
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Trailer: 1979 Boler B1700
Posts: 9,040
In the profile of the Coquihalla in post #73, the highest road elevation is about 1300 metres, or 4300 feet, and that's a high-elevation road. Even highways which climb greatly still climb to mountain passes, not peaks, so that really low power output at 10,000 feet doesn't bother me... but the bottom half of the chart describes an effect which really does matter to many of us.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cpaharley2008 View Post
... would a supercharger alleviate the thinner air
Yes.
When people say "supercharger" they usually mean one which is driven mechanically (such as by a belt) from the engine's output. One driven by an exhaust-driven turbine is a turbosupercharger... or just turbocharger for short. Turbochargers are great for compensating for increased elevation, and essentially make the engine itself unaware of the thinner atmosphere, boosting the intake pressure up and then recovering energy as they let the exhaust pressure back down. Piston engines for aircraft are typically turbocharged to keep their output up at high altitudes, not so much for more power down near sea level.

Since all modern diesel engines for vehicles are turbocharged, choosing a diesel is an easy way to get this benefit of turbocharging.
Brian B-P is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2014, 02:01 PM   #106
Senior Member
 
Jim Bennett's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Trailer: 2017 Escape 5.0 TA
Posts: 11,932
Calgary is around 3,500 ft in elevation. I had never heard of a loss of power due to this, but now wonder the effects. A 10-12% reduction in power is not small, but then, nothing we can do about it.

Maybe I just need to use my F-350. With a towing capacity of 15,000 lbs, a few horsepower here and there really won't matter.
__________________
2017 Escape 5.0 TA
2015 Ford F150 Lariat 3.5L EcoBoost
2009 Escape 19 (previous)
“Most folks are about as happy as they make up their minds to be.” — Abraham Lincoln
Jim Bennett is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2014, 03:25 PM   #107
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Trailer: 1979 Boler B1700
Posts: 9,040
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Bennett View Post
Calgary is around 3,500 ft in elevation...

Maybe I just need to use my F-350. With a towing capacity of 15,000 lbs, a few horsepower here and there really won't matter.
Well sure, if you don't have an F-450 handy for serious capacity(24,000 lb).

A significant point from earlier in the discussion is that rated towing capacity indicates little about performance. The F-350 may have five times the rated capacity of a typical minivan or SUV, but it weighs almost twice as much and doesn't even have twice the power. The F-450 has no more power than the F-350, to pull the much greater allowed load. The SAE J2807 standards even allow dually pickups to be slower in the testing, because they know they will be slow when loaded up. That's the same standard that says a normal tug only needs to maintain 40 mph up a 5% grade with the rated trailer.

Of course, most F-350s are now turbodiesels (although you can still get a 6.2L gas engine) and that turbo is what will keep it working despite Calgary's elevation... and that of the mountain passes.
Brian B-P is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2014, 04:55 PM   #108
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Boise, Idaho
Trailer: 2014 17B
Posts: 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian B-P View Post
In the profile of the Coquihalla in post #73, the highest road elevation is about 1300 metres, or 4300 feet, and that's a high-elevation road. Even highways which climb greatly still climb to mountain passes, not peaks, so that really low power output at 10,000 feet doesn't bother me... but the bottom half of the chart describes an effect which really does matter to many of us.
I would not consider 4300ft to be a high elevation road A lot of the valley floors in Idaho are 5k to 6k ft with the highest paved pass being 8700ft. Once you head to Utah or Colorado things get even worse.

Teton pass going from Idaho to Wyoming tops out at 8500ft, but the grade is 10%.

A lot depends on location, but I imagine pulling a 21 over some of these passes with a 4runner would be a struggle.
smilycook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2014, 06:11 PM   #109
Senior Member
 
techfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Longview, WA, Washington
Trailer: 2013 Escape 15B - 2014 Nissan Frontier SL
Posts: 858
Try highway 12 in Utah between Capital Reef and Bryce Canyon. 14% grade and 9,600 feet
__________________
Tim and Julie
2013 Escape 15B
2014 Nissan Frontier, Previous 2012 Santa Fe
techfan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2014, 09:08 PM   #110
Senior Member
 
Jim Bennett's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Trailer: 2017 Escape 5.0 TA
Posts: 11,932
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian B-P View Post
Well sure, if you don't have an F-450 handy for serious capacity(24,000 lb).
I think mine is about 22,000 lbs for a fifth wheel, the biggest difference is the F-450 has a higher gear ratio. I am sure liking the newer 6.7 litre diesel. It is WAY quieter than my old 6.3 is.
__________________

__________________
2017 Escape 5.0 TA
2015 Ford F150 Lariat 3.5L EcoBoost
2009 Escape 19 (previous)
“Most folks are about as happy as they make up their minds to be.” — Abraham Lincoln
Jim Bennett is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off






» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:44 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2012 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.