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Old 11-03-2014, 11:08 PM   #71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WestEnder View Post
Think of a gps as a compliment to a map not instead of a map. A good map will show what kind of road you are looking at as well as how that road relates to everything around it. That will help you tell the difference between the gravel road over the mountain compared to the paved road around it. Or for that matter, the short road with lots of traffic lights instead of the slightly longer freeway.

It helps to have several maps. The map that helps you find your way across the state won't tell you that the road between the small town you are in now and the campground you are heading for is wickedly steep. You need both.

The gps is of the most value when you are on the way. Put your preferred route in and you won't have to look at a map while driving (always a dangerous thing).

And please, take a paper map. As a career natural resources professional who has search and rescue responsibility in the past, you have no idea how many folks I've seen with dead batteries in their gps and no clue where they were or which way to go. A map and compass and the skill to use them can be the difference between life and death for anyone who goes off the beaten track.

As for myself, I carry a gps, a compass and an assortment of maps of varying scales everyday at work, even though I'm in an area I've worked in for years. I may not need them on any particular day but I have them anyway and so do every one of my professional colleagues.

Sorry to preach, but it's something I feel strongly about.
We always have maps. Our GPSs have been unusable many times because of various problems with them, especially not being able to charge them because the parts do not fit well for long.
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Old 11-03-2014, 11:13 PM   #72
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Originally Posted by ice-breaker View Post
I am a firm believer in not taking the word of my GPS as gospel. At least when you blindly follow your GPS's directions down that impassible goat path in the wilderness, you will be able to live in comfort in your new Escape until you are either rescued, or you die of starvation.
Yes, plenty of water and food are more important to have than your Garmin, especially when the Garmin goofs you up.
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Old 11-04-2014, 12:32 AM   #73
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I have to admit that I can be old fashioned in many ways. When it comes to towing I prefer to have way more capacity than I will ever need. As for the Garmin, I've had just enough experience to not like it. With the OnStar in the new truck, taking it home the first day it was making more noise than I was willing to put up with. I still like my Rand McNally over most maps. I think there is a book called the Mile Post for heading up to Alaska and I will certainly have one of those. Loren
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Old 11-04-2014, 01:22 AM   #74
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Then there is this for the mountains: Mountain Driving Guide for Truckers, RV and Motorhome Drivers
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Old 11-04-2014, 01:30 AM   #75
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Lewis View Post
The point is that I remain satisfied with the Tacoma as a tow vehicle for the Escape 21; I'm less satisfied with the Garmin GPS for sending a newbie into the stratosphere on his first trip.
I think your Garmin picked a good route, considering the remote conditions and mountainous terrain between Moab, UT and Dinosaur NM: 211 miles with an 8300 ft. pass via CO 139. An alternative route through Price, UT is OK, but it's 246 miles with a 9100 ft. pass on US 191. Otherwise, you could go east to Rifle, CO and north on CO 13 for a 7400 foot pass, but the distance is 310 miles.

Towing in the Intermountain West requires patience, with slower speeds and longer travel times, but you will be MUCH faster than the semi trucks on those same roads. Also, many of those roads have extra lanes and other passing opportunities so slow vehicles won't hold up traffic.

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Old 11-04-2014, 01:31 AM   #76
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Mountain Directory, East and West

WestEnder's suggestion is excellent. Those guides take a lot of the guesswork out of route planning, especially if you would prefer to avoid the steepest roads. Here's a sample:

Sample from the Wyoming section
of the Mountain Directory West:


12. TETON PASS elev. 8429'
(on Wyoming Highway 22 west of Jackson, WY)

Teton Pass has sustained 10% grades on both sides of the summit. An unusual feature is that both runaway truck ramps on the east side of the pass can be used only if the runaway truck crosses the oncoming lane of traffic. There is a posted weight limit of 60,000 lbs. on this pass.

The westbound descent from the summit of Teton Pass begins with a 25 mph speed limit and a truck warning sign--"Steep grade--10% next 3 miles--use lower gear." This grade warning is repeated a mile later. About 2½ miles down from the summit the grade eases to 6-7% and the speed limit increases. This grade continues for about 3-4 miles and eases near the Idaho state line.

The eastbound descent from the summit of Teton Pass starts with a truck warning sign--"Steep grade--10% next 5 1/2 miles--use lower gear." There are 20 mph curves near the top. About 1/3 mile down from the summit is a sign--"Runaway truck ramp--2½ miles LEFT side." This warning is repeated several times as you approach the ramp. To use the ramp you must cross the oncoming lane of traffic. The ramp slopes uphill.

The second runaway truck ramp is about 1 mile after the first. It, too, is on the left side and is an upsloping ramp. At this point the grade begins to ease to about 6-7% and the speed limit increases. The hill continues to the town of Wilson, which is about 5½ miles from the summit.

Mountain Driving Guide for Truckers, RV and Motorhome Drivers
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File Type: jpg TetonPass.jpg (100.9 KB, 12 views)
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Old 11-04-2014, 02:13 AM   #77
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Strangely enough, used copies are usually both very old editions and hideously expensive. Get them from the publisher. I guess people who have them don't sell them.
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Old 11-04-2014, 07:50 AM   #78
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Originally Posted by Bill and Earline View Post
We're still considering the 3.0L diesel in the Ram, and would love to hear how it does, particularly with a 21' on the steep grades and higher elevations. Seems like a couple of our forum have that particular engine in either the Ram or Jeep. We almost bought one last week, but decided to give our 2003 V-6 (245 hp/282 lb-ft) a whirl on the initial pick-up and trip home.
I have a friend that has the 3.0 diesel Ram 1500 and tows a small travel trailer, a Casita. He loves that combo for towing, and the Ram as his daily driver.

I haven't heard anything negative about small diesel Ram and probably would have purchased one myself if it had been available in 2012 when I got the Ram Cummins.

I look forward to towing a lighter camper through the Rockies on my next trip out there, who knows I might even trade in the Ram 2500 for Diesel Ram 1500 by then.
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Old 11-04-2014, 08:07 AM   #79
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I know of at least one member here with the 3.0 and the new 5.0 TA combo, lives in Florida and just finished a 5 month trip back from Chilliwack, he is averaging 18-19 mpg towing with no issues. Not aware of any member pulling the 21' trailer with the 3.0 combo, yet.
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Old 11-04-2014, 09:23 AM   #80
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Thanks to all for the feedback on the 3.0. I spoke with our Florida member on the phone, and he seems to really enjoy his Ram pulling his Escape 5.0TA. Maybe we'll be the first for the Ram 3.0, with a 21' if the 4Runner struggles. I did add a transmission cooler, a ScanGuage to monitor trans temps, a full frame HiddenHitch, a brake controller, and will use an Andersen hitch.
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