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Old 01-26-2017, 01:40 PM   #1
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Tundra recall coming in February

Just read about this recall for the rear bumper step on 2016 and 2017 Tundras. I know I'm not the only one on this forum with that type of truck. They need to replace the resin bracket for the step with a steel one.

https://www.cnet.com/roadshow/news/t...-bumper-steps/
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Old 01-26-2017, 02:40 PM   #2
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Weather Tech sells a bumper step / protector made from a plastic resin . It is almost bullet proof. Hard to believe that Toyota didn't know that the bracket needed to be able to support the weight of a human . Hopefully no one was injured .
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Old 01-26-2017, 03:03 PM   #3
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From the linked article:
Quote:
The problem lies in the resin itself. If a Tundra is involved in a collision that affects a corner of the rear bumper, it may damage the resin reinforcement bracket without the owner's knowledge. The next time somebody steps on that corner of the bumper, part of it may break, which increases the chance of injury. And there aren't any "soft" parts back there.

In order to remedy the issue, Toyota will replace the resin reinforcement brackets with steel ones. The rear bumper tread covers will also be replaced. The steel bracket should eliminate the issue.
According to this, the problem exists only as a result of collision damage; there is no suggestion that the bracket is unable to handle the weight of a person on the step.

It appears that the fix is to use a steel bracket, because the steel one will be visibly bent and destroyed in a collision, causing the owner to have it repaired. Not any stronger, just shows damage more clearly. The same problem exists in aircraft structures, in which damage (due to collision with objects or stress-induced degradation in use) to a composite component is harder to detect than comparable damage to an aluminum component.
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Old 01-26-2017, 03:45 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian B-P View Post
From the linked article:

According to this, the problem exists only as a result of collision damage; there is no suggestion that the bracket is unable to handle the weight of a person on the step.

It appears that the fix is to use a steel bracket, because the steel one will be visibly bent and destroyed in a collision, causing the owner to have it repaired. Not any stronger, just shows damage more clearly. The same problem exists in aircraft structures, in which damage (due to collision with objects or stress-induced degradation in use) to a composite component is harder to detect than comparable damage to an aluminum component.
Several articles about the Tundra's bumper step described it as
"Chintzy" and " Cheap" Hardly a glowing recommendation !
A slight tap on the rear bumper should not cause permanent damage to this component.
It seems all vehicle manufacturers are building their vehicles as cheaply as possible and then when something fails either denying the problem or issuing a recall. Since all vehicles are subject to rear end crash tests why wasn't this problem discovered during the crash tests.
My 2014 vehicle has had 5 recalls in 2 years which indicates that little time is spent testing the vehicle before shoving it out into the market place.
Toyota is driven by the same profit motive as all the other auto manufacturers and is no better or worse than the others !
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Old 01-26-2017, 05:25 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by Brian B-P View Post
The same problem exists in aircraft structures, in which damage (due to collision with objects or stress-induced degradation in use) to a composite component is harder to detect than comparable damage to an aluminum component.
Which is why, as a frequent flyer, I don't like flying on an Airbus, or any aircraft with lots of carbon fiber or composite components in the airframe. It's much harder to determine when a component should be replaced, vs an aluminum airframe, which easily reveals stress cracks when examined or x-rayed.

This is mitigated by a religious adherence to a replacement and maintenance schedule, but I still don't like it.
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Old 01-26-2017, 05:27 PM   #6
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Does not seem like any big deal. I will wait to worry about when and if something happens. The bumper is more than adequate.
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Old 01-26-2017, 05:42 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by rbryan4 View Post
Which is why, as a frequent flyer, I don't like flying on an Airbus, or any aircraft with lots of carbon fiber or composite components in the airframe. It's much harder to determine when a component should be replaced, vs an aluminum airframe, which easily reveals stress cracks when examined or x-rayed.

This is mitigated by a religious adherence to a replacement and maintenance schedule, but I still don't like it.
Guess you won't be taking many trips on a Boeing 787 Dreamliner. I share your concern, though-- it seems that the technology isn't mature, so we don't know how the airframe will behave as it ages.

On the other hand, I read an interview with aircraft designer Burt Rutan where he said that if composite materials had been available when aircraft were first being built, no one would have ever built one out of aluminum, due to the fatigue cracks that aluminum acquires over time. That was interesting to read.
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Old 01-26-2017, 05:55 PM   #8
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Guess you won't be taking many trips on a Boeing 787 Dreamliner. I share your concern, though-- it seems that the technology isn't mature, so we don't know how the airframe will behave as it ages.

On the other hand, I read an interview with aircraft designer Burt Rutan where he said that if composite materials had been available when aircraft were first being built, no one would have ever built one out of aluminum, due to the fatigue cracks that aluminum acquires over time. That was interesting to read.
Yes, the Dreamliner does raise some concern. But, I've flown on it, and I have to say, what an aircraft.

Burt Rutan is one of my heroes. But in this case, aluminum revealing it's wear is actually a positive, not a negative. I'd rather have something give me warning before it fails, rather than look perfect until the moment it fails catastrophically. You know?
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Old 01-26-2017, 06:06 PM   #9
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This might be a challenge. A few years ago I went on a tour of Boeing's plant in Everett, Washington (highly recommended). At the time they were building the first 787s. A traditional test Boeing gives the first aircraft of a series is to bend the wings upward until they break. The 787 wings did not break-- they were bent upward until the wingtips touched. I have no idea how to monitor fatigue in that case.
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Old 01-26-2017, 06:08 PM   #10
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They pretty much rely on flight cycles or flight hours. Once a certain component reaches a predetermined number of cycles, replacement is required. You just hope they guessed right on the number of cycles it can withstand.
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