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Old 12-29-2014, 09:21 PM   #11
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All Weather tires are recommended for places like Toronto and Vancouver, so they'd be good in Portland.
Here's a story from the Globe and Mail.
Are all-weather tires a good compromise? - The Globe and Mail
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Old 12-29-2014, 09:45 PM   #12
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Well, here in Oswego (average snowfall 150" - 200") we understand snow tires. I've been putting 4 of them on my vehicles for a number of years, even the two wheel drive ones. That said, I don't need them (yet) this year - bare ground & roads most of this winter.
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Old 12-29-2014, 10:44 PM   #13
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I've been putting 4 of them on my vehicles for a number of years, even the two wheel drive ones.
Absolutely the thing to do. Before front wheel drive became common, it was common to use snow tires on only the rear (of a rear wheel drive), but the result was poor stopping and turning. With modern winter tires (quite different from the snow lugs of decades ago), this is even more important. With front wheel drive, winter tires on only the front invite loss of control.

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That said, I don't need them (yet) this year - bare ground & roads most of this winter.
Here, a common schedule is to switch to winters at Hallowe'en, and back to "summer" (usually "all-season") tires around Easter... for those who think of their annual timetable in terms of holidays.

Even on relatively bare roads, the tread rubber compound of winter tires works better than all-seasons at low temperatures, so the tire companies are now advising to switch at 7 degrees C (45 degrees Fahrenheit).
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Old 12-29-2014, 11:17 PM   #14
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This year for the first time in about 35 yrs I put snow tires on three of my vehicles. We previously used all season tires year round on all of our vehicles. I have not noticed any marked improvement in traction while accelerating but have been pleasantly surprised with the improved traction during braking.
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Old 12-30-2014, 12:19 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by gbaglo View Post
All Weather tires are recommended for places like Toronto and Vancouver, so they'd be good in Portland.
Here's a story from the Globe and Mail.
Are all-weather tires a good compromise? - The Globe and Mail
I have used Nokian's "all-weather" WR tires on two vehicles, and Nokian's Hakkapeliitta R as well as other serious winter tires on the same vehicles. I agree with this author's assessment of the WR, although the important thing he fails to mention is the high rate of tread wear in summer conditions - not as bad as normal winter tires, but still too high for me. Between the wear and the less-than-the-best winter traction, I went back to separate summer and winter sets, but if I moved to a milder location I would consider the WR (or Hankook Optimo 4S) again.

The all-weather tires also seem like a good choice to use on a trailer which is towed in moderate winter conditions.
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Old 12-30-2014, 09:42 AM   #16
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This year for the first time in about 35 yrs I put snow tires on three of my vehicles. We previously used all season tires year round on all of our vehicles. I have not noticed any marked improvement in traction while accelerating but have been pleasantly surprised with the improved traction during braking.
Hi: ice-breaker...On snow or ice covered roads I use neutral to improve traction during braking. Quite like engaging the clutch in a stick-shift car it removes the pull/push of the transmission for improved stopping distances.
My only wish is that the guy behind can stop as fast!!! Alf
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Old 12-30-2014, 11:14 AM   #17
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I have to admit that when having to stop quickly one of the first things I do is check the mirror to see if those following me are going to get stopped. We have x-ice 3 tires on the car and toyo obersve gsi-5 on the van and yukon. I do believe the x-ice-3 do stop better on polished ice intersections but the toyos have better traction in deep snow. I have had studded winters before and they are awesome all the while the studs are fresh but once they are smoothed off a bit I was quite disapointed
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Old 12-30-2014, 12:56 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by dave macrae View Post
I have to admit that when having to stop quickly one of the first things I do is check the mirror to see if those following me are going to get stopped. We have x-ice 3 tires on the car and toyo obersve gsi-5 on the van and yukon. I do believe the x-ice-3 do stop better on polished ice intersections but the toyos have better traction in deep snow. I have had studded winters before and they are awesome all the while the studs are fresh but once they are smoothed off a bit I was quite disapointed
Have to agree on studs. We generally drive on either dry pavement or hard packed snow; rarely ice. Studs add very little benefit under those conditions, plus they are niosy, and NY has On/Off dates for studded tires. I run Michelin's Latitude X Ice tires on the RAV4 during the winter, and find them a huge improvement over the Goodyear Assurance Fuel Max tires I run the rest of the year. They also provide a smoother ride. I'd use them year round, but they wear too fast during the warm months.
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Old 12-30-2014, 01:31 PM   #19
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I have snows on the truck ... and walked everywhere when the roads got slick awhile ago.
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Old 12-30-2014, 04:59 PM   #20
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On snow or ice covered roads I use neutral to improve traction during braking. Quite like engaging the clutch in a stick-shift car it removes the pull/push of the transmission for improved stopping distances.
I think you meant pushing the pedal to disengage the clutch, but I get the idea.

I remember discovering this over thirty years ago - it made a huge difference. That was with a rear-wheel-drive 1971 carburetor-equipped 5-litre engine and hydraulically controlled 3-speed automatic transmission. When we got our front-wheel-drive van a decade ago, with its electronically-managed 5-speed automatic transmission and computer-controlled (including throttle-by-wire) 3.5L engine I found that shifting to neutral made little if any difference... the van isn't fighting itself.
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