Fact or Fiction, Parking on grass/dirt speeds frame rust. - Page 3 - Escape Trailer Owners Community

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Old 06-13-2016, 01:05 PM   #21
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My '94 Tacoma had a lot of rust on the frame. The local body shop sandblasted and sprayed on Rust Bullet for me.

I had researched and purchased the Rust Bullet as the body shop was not familiar with it. He asked me to bring the Tacoma back in a couple times so he could see how well it was working. He said he had not had a lot of luck with other products, but was impressed with how well the Rust Bullet was holding up to our Wisconsin road salt attacks. I sold it after a couple of years so I can't say how much longer it lasted than that.
Eric we have something in common . Also had a 1994 Toyota . Bought brand new and had for 12 years . Going to give the Rust Bullet a look see . Have lots of Rustolum because have iron fencing in front to attend to . Constance maintenance . Pat
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Old 06-13-2016, 01:06 PM   #22
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I've been using chassis saver on my utility trailer frame and on my '66 f100 and anything else I want to protect from rusting out. It's like Por15 in that it needs to be top coated because it has no UV protection. Even without a top coat it's good for 4-5 years, it just turns grey. If you use Por 15 or Chassis saver or that type rust coating when you put the lid back on blow some propane gas or some kind of inert gas in the can and then put a piece of plastic (saran wrap or half of a baggie) between the lid and the can. The product will stay usable longer.
Good information on storing cans ! Pat
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Old 06-13-2016, 01:27 PM   #23
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Eric we have something in common . Also had a 1994 Toyota . Bought brand new and had for 12 years . Going to give the Rust Bullet a look see . Have lots of Rustolum because have iron fencing in front to attend to . Constance maintenance . Pat
I really liked that little Tacoma, it was a nice size. But its 4 cylinder engine sure wasn't up to towing.
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Old 06-13-2016, 01:45 PM   #24
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It's true that paint in a spray bomb is thin and a once or twice over with it doesn't put on as thick a coat as a brush. However sometimes, when painting somewhat convoluted objects spraying is the way to go. In the case of painting my car frame with Tremclad, I put on 3 wet coats with a contrasting coat as the second coat to ensure 100% coverage with each coat. Eight years on and no rust.

I think because sometimes, after the first coat making the object so much better, there's a temptation to leave it at one coat. In the case of paint I think more is better.

Ron
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Old 06-13-2016, 01:54 PM   #25
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I really liked that little Tacoma, it was a nice size. But its 4 cylinder engine sure wasn't up to towing.
Eric , no not for towing but strong 4 cy engine on truck . When I sold it buyer wanted to check compression and we took to his mechanic . I changed oil regliously with Castrol . With 187,000 , mechanic couldn't believe the compression and inside valve train it was so clean . No gunk . Truck never gave me any trouble but in those days truck was small , but it was solid . Pat
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Old 06-13-2016, 01:55 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by Ron in BC View Post
It's true that paint in a spray bomb is thin and a once or twice over with it doesn't put on as thick a coat as a brush. However sometimes, when painting somewhat convoluted objects spraying is the way to go. In the case of painting my car frame with Tremclad, I put on 3 wet coats with a contrasting coat as the second coat to ensure 100% coverage with each coat. Eight years on and no rust.

I think because sometimes, after the first coat making the object so much better, there's a temptation to leave it at one coat. In the case of paint I think more is better.

Ron
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Old 06-13-2016, 02:45 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by Ron in BC View Post
It's true that paint in a spray bomb is thin and a once or twice over with it doesn't put on as thick a coat as a brush. However sometimes, when painting somewhat convoluted objects spraying is the way to go.
That makes sense to me. Spraying can miss nooks and crevices, too, possibly by bridging over them. It's only a guess, but maybe spraying then brushing the sprayed paint into every corner would be ideal.

I have used an airless sprayer, and while paint viscosity is still important, it can handle reasonably thick paint. I used it to get a better-than-brushed finish on some metal cabinets, and it works for that. I would certainly consider it for a bare trailer (or sports car) frame, but the mess of spraying a frame under a trailer body doesn't appeal to me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron in BC View Post
In the case of painting my car frame with Tremclad, I put on 3 wet coats with a contrasting coat as the second coat to ensure 100% coverage with each coat. Eight years on and no rust.

I think because sometimes, after the first coat making the object so much better, there's a temptation to leave it at one coat. In the case of paint I think more is better.
Excellent idea! I've heard that primers for household painting are available which change colour as they dry so that you can clearly see that the coat is complete, but simply changing paint colours seems like an effective approach which works with any paint (as long as it is available in more than one colour).
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Old 06-13-2016, 03:10 PM   #28
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I have had good luck with Rust Destroyer, it is a rust converting primer available at Home Depot and most paint stores. It is much less expensive than the POR 15, and available in quarts, gallons or spray cans. I have not used it on a trailer, but have used it on architecture steel and wrought iron. Works great.
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Old 07-06-2016, 10:11 PM   #29
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Paint or no paint, a sure fire undercarriage environment promoting humidity promoting rust is leaving it parked on grass. Don't do it.
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Old 07-06-2016, 10:32 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by Ron in BC View Post
I don't think the parking on gravel etc. has anything to do with rust on Escape frames. I think the black paint on new Escapes is paper thin, about the same as if the bare metal was given a once over with a spray bomb.

My frame showed unsightly rust within weeks. I've wire brushed a fair amount of it and applied two coats of Tremclad which is holding up just fine.

I really wish more protection was provided to the frame. If powder coating was an option I'd have gladly paid for it rather than having to repaint the whole frame from underneath.

Ron
that's disappointing to hear, for $30k+ trailers one might expect a very high quality paint job..ain't no paint expert but a 2 part polane/epoxy or powder coat might be good..what about that undercoating people up north put on the underside of their vehicles for use on the trailer frame....perhaps Escape should outsource the trailer frame to professionals.
will send an email to Escape, find out what the paint process is now...
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