Jacking Up Escape for Winter? - Page 2 - Escape Trailer Owners Community

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Old 11-21-2013, 12:09 AM   #11
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Don't know about your particular situation, but Escape describes them as stabilizers, not jacks. The ones I have on mine are not intended to lift the trailer, and to use them that way will damage them.
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Old 11-21-2013, 12:13 AM   #12
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Mine are the full scissor jacks - Reace said they came by mistake, so he went ahead and put them on at no extra cost to me. He said I could probably change a tire using them.
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Old 11-21-2013, 12:57 AM   #13
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I park all my trailers when outside on wood to insulate them from the warm or cold ground.
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Old 11-21-2013, 01:03 AM   #14
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Quote:
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I park all my trailers when outside on wood to insulate them from the warm or cold ground.
Chuck
I need somebody to explain the science behind that.

I can understand how, if I sit on a piece of plywood, I will be warmer than if I sit on concrete, but I'm emitting heat and the plywood is an insulator. But, the tire isn't emitting any heat. So how does that work?

baglo
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Old 11-21-2013, 03:09 AM   #15
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I had 2 year old Maxtow tires go bad with bubbles in the inside of the tire. When I brought it into the small tire shop I use the owner suggested getting the tires off the ground when I put it in winter storage, best yet was to remove them and bring them in out of the cold. I can understand getting them off the ground so as to not damage the sidewalls sitting in one position when stored for our 5/6 months of winter (his description), but not bringing them in the basement. Since putting on the new tires I've been blocking it up for the winter.
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Old 11-21-2013, 07:37 AM   #16
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Quote:
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I need somebody to explain the science behind that.

I can understand how, if I sit on a piece of plywood, I will be warmer than if I sit on concrete, but I'm emitting heat and the plywood is an insulator. But, the tire isn't emitting any heat. So how does that work?

baglo
Actually, Rubber likes wood better than concrete or asphalt and dirt. Rubber comes from trees. If you can prevent any kind of leaching using wood it may help the tire.
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Old 11-21-2013, 08:35 AM   #17
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Here is what Goodyear recommends:

"storing your vehicle properly helps protect your tires.
• Keep your vehicle in a cool, dry storage area out of direct sunlight and UV rays.
• Unload your vehicle so that minimum weight is on the tires.
• Inflate your tires to recommended operation pressure plus 25%, but don’t exceed the rim manufacturer’s inflation capacity.
• Thoroughly clean your tires with soap and water before storing them to remove any oils that may have accumulated from the road.
• Move your vehicle at least every three months to help prevent cracking and flat-spotting, but avoid moving it during extremely cold weather.
• Place your vehicle on blocks to remove the weight from the tires. If the vehicle can’t be put on blocks, make sure the storage surface is firm, clean, well-drained and reasonably level."
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Old 11-21-2013, 09:43 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cpaharley2008 View Post
Actually, Rubber likes wood better than concrete or asphalt and dirt. Rubber comes from trees. If you can prevent any kind of leaching using wood it may help the tire.
Jim, I looked around a bit and couldn't find anything reliable about concrete or dirt being bad for tires to sit on, but I did find this: Bridgestone: "Storage surfaces should be clean and free of grease, gasoline or other substances which can deteriorate the rubber." I think all the oils, etc in asphalt might qualify as something that might be bad for long time contact.
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Old 11-21-2013, 10:26 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thoer View Post
Bridgestone: "Storage surfaces should be clean and free of grease, gasoline or other substances which can deteriorate the rubber." I think all the oils, etc in asphalt might qualify as something that might be bad for long time contact.
I hope asphalt isn't too bad for tires. I mainly drive on asphalt.
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Old 11-21-2013, 11:59 AM   #20
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Factor in that tires are not made of rubber.
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