re-torque of trailer wheels/what's the ft.lbs. - Page 2 - Escape Trailer Owners Community

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Old 04-02-2015, 07:25 PM   #11
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Jubal, thanks for the link. It was informative, but I didn’t see anything that stated the need for checking alloy wheels frequently.

To be picky, there’s also so much that goes into applying and measuring torque that wasn’t covered. For example, they showed an extension being used with a torque wrench. Even though it’s convenient to do so, and saves knuckles, it reduces the accuracy of the torque being measured. The longer and thinner the extension, and the softer the material of that extension, the more effect it has. The position of your hand on the torque wrench along with the angle of the wrench to the nut when being used plays a large part in accuracy. Buying a more expensive wrench doesn’t even increase your chances of being accurate. AND, the way you store your wrench even plays a part.

They also suggested using lubricant on the bolt threads, and not on the seating surface. Sounds good, but adding lubricant, any kind of lubricant, (and there are so many viscosities out there) also changes the torque measurement. We’ve found torque wrenches to be very inaccurate when it comes to applying and measuring the amount of torque applied to a bolt. The best and most accurate way to measure torque on a bolt is by measuring thread stretch, and that is best done with ultrasonics. Luckily, we don’t need that kind of accuracy when it comes to our wheels, because that gets very expensive. But I believe knowing what adds to torque inaccuracies is a good thing.

Didn’t I say I was going to be picky?
Tom
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Old 04-02-2015, 09:05 PM   #12
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Picky aside, is the use of a typical torque wrench reasonable? How inaccurate is "very inaccurate? "
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Old 04-02-2015, 09:06 PM   #13
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Or better stated, is it good enough?
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Old 04-02-2015, 09:31 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jubal View Post
The lug nut torque on alloy wheel should be checked frequently.
https://www.tirerack.com/wheels/tech...jsp?techid=107
Absolutely, postively true. Don't forget it may not just be your trailer, but your tug as well.

I purchased a Harbor Freight torgue wrench, on sale w/ coupon < $20 cheap insurance. YMMV
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Old 04-02-2015, 09:53 PM   #15
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Forgive me Donna, but my experience with Harbor Freight is that it is the King of Crap. For something as important as proper torque on wheel lugs I would suggest buying a good Domestic product such as the Husky sold at Home Depot. Even Sears stuff is MIC.

Edit: Also, whenever I can I will refuse to buy anything made in China because of all the coal fired air pollution that is poisoning not only their citizens but ours too. Easier said than done I know but start with a tool.
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Old 04-02-2015, 10:15 PM   #16
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Normally Roussue I'd agree with you when it comes to tools. I'm a hotrodder, good tools on a build/rebuild are important. But something that get's used once in a while (like once every six months... for a total of 12 times in ten years)... hummmm, not so much. I'm not about to spend $175 on a tool when one that is used "ocassionally" for a whole lot less. Now, let's not talk about screw drivers
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Old 04-02-2015, 10:24 PM   #17
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Likewise on agreement. I paid $80 and it has a long handle to be able to get the leverage done easily. Also comes with a case.
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Old 04-02-2015, 10:25 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Donna D. View Post

good tools on a build/rebuild are important. But something that get's used once in a while (like once every six months... for a total of 12 times in ten years)... hummmm, not so much.:
Gotta agree with you, I have several including a really good one. But I keep a lower level one in the trailer. Been torquing up things for a lot of years, extensions and all, without ever having an improper torque setting problem.

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Old 04-02-2015, 10:30 PM   #19
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I really like my American Made Proto torque wrench. It's accurately calibrated, comes with detailed instructions, has a range of 30 to 150 lbs. high polish, good storage box, and will last me the rest of my life. That's how I buy things now, might not have as many, but I like quality in my tools, equipment, guns and whiskey.
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Old 04-02-2015, 11:09 PM   #20
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OK, so here’s the thing. The cost of a torque wrench seems to have little bearing on it’s ability at applying consistent torque. We rejected whole series of wrenches from multiple manufacturers because they were inconsistent, including Snap-On, Proto, and others. I don’t know that we used any from China, so I can’t comment on that. I also don’t remember just how inaccurate the wrenches were in a controlled environment. (I can check on that) But applying torque and measuring it has so many things that effect that measurement, outside of the wrench itself, making the potential very high for inaccurate measurements.

That said, using a torque wrench is still preferable to winging it. If you pay attention to things that contribute to poor readings, do the same at each lug nut, you’ll at least be applying the same torque to each of those lug nuts.

I happen to own a Craftsmen, which I owned prior to working at a lab, and it tested out pretty well. It is the tip-it type and it did need adjusting to improve it’s accuracy.

Wrenches should always be stored in their non-compressed state, (0ft/lbs) but don’t take it below 0. Many wrenches are tip-it type in construction. Dialing them below 0 could allow the tip-it to tip in the wrong direction, and that could damage the wrench if use is attempted before it’s taken apart and configured correctly.
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