Using anti seize compound on wheel lugs - Escape Trailer Owners Community

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Old 02-16-2014, 02:09 PM   #1
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Using anti seize compound on wheel lugs

Several members mentioned the use of thread locker on my other post and upon research I found the product called anti seize compound. I ordered both but upon research have found there are two sides on the use of this product on your wheel lugs. some say the use allows too much torque to be applied while others say it makes the removal of wheel a lot easier. What do feel is best?
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Old 02-16-2014, 02:27 PM   #2
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Jim - I have read huge long "discussions" on that one in various places. Here is my thought on it and I could well be wrong. I put some lube on the threads, but make sure that there is none on the mating surfaces of the wheel and the lug nut's bevel. My theory is that the correct torque will still be generated between the surface of the wheel and the nut's bevel, while protecting the threads from rusting together.
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Old 02-16-2014, 02:58 PM   #3
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Jim do a search on this subject and draw your own conclusion. Mine was DON'T DO IT! Tighten and torque your lugs dry. After a few miles, it never hurts to recheck them.
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Old 02-16-2014, 04:26 PM   #4
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I use anti-seize on woodworking tooling to keep from galling the threads as they are loosened and retightened frequently. But!, the cutter head manufacturers stress that the recommended torque be reduced by approx. 20% to keep from over torquing the bolts and stretching them. I would not recommend using anti-seize on wheel nuts. However I do use a little motor oil on my lug nuts, stressing "a little".
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Old 02-16-2014, 04:48 PM   #5
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The benefits of using antisieze on lugnuts may offset the risks if:
The wheel are frequently exposed to corrosive materials such as road deicers used here in the rust belt.
The antisieze is applied to the threads moderately.
The wheel lug nuts are torqued properly with a torque wrench and retorqued after 50 miles every time the wheels are removed and reinstalled.
Aluminum wheels with acorn lug nuts had the highest incidence of siezure during my experience as a auto tech.
If you remove your wheels for maintenance annually the probablity of siezed lugs is very low.
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Old 02-16-2014, 09:00 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kluanie View Post
... the cutter head manufacturers stress that the recommended torque be reduced by approx. 20% to keep from over torquing the bolts and stretching them.
I have often used a little anti-seize on wheel nut threads, but I am not advising anyone else to do this, due to the issue of getting correct torque. The issue is that the normal tightening torque, with less torque taken up by friction, results in more than intended tension in the bolt. This would be a particularly large concern for those allowing air-tool-wielding morons to work on their vehicles (air tools are fine... used properly). It seems to me that this concern applies whether the lubrication is on the threads or the seats.

I don't use oil on threads in general: if I'm going to add lubrication, at the risk of incorrect torque or tension, it might as well be something which prevents the connection from seizing. Having said that, specialized fasteners in specific applications (such as internally in an engine) may have specific procedures which should be followed. Of particular concern - and not relevant to wheel nuts - are steel bolts or studs threaded directly into aluminum components.

While I have no issue with following the dry-threads direction, even that will work as intended only if the threads are clean. Anti-seize compound may be controversial, but rust and dirt are just entirely bad.
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Old 02-16-2014, 09:43 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thoer View Post
Jim - I have read huge long "discussions" on that one in various places. Here is my thought on it and I could well be wrong. I put some lube on the threads, but make sure that there is none on the mating surfaces of the wheel and the lug nut's bevel. My theory is that the correct torque will still be generated between the surface of the wheel and the nut's bevel, while protecting the threads from rusting together.
I agree. This is what I do too with lug nuts. Never had an issue, and removal is sooooo much easier.
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Old 02-16-2014, 10:52 PM   #8
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Even though most manufacturers will recommend against this strongly I must admit I use anti seize on most things I have apart . I do use it on the threads of the wheel nuts but none on the tapered seating surface of the nuts . I also use it on the flange of the wheels to the hubs and behind the hub to drum surface. I guess it's just growing up in Nova Scotia and all rust in that province . I check the torque of the wheels nuts on a regular basis and have never had anything I own come loose .
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Old 02-17-2014, 12:15 AM   #9
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In general if it is something I will have to take apart again and is not going to cause catastrophic failure if it becomes loose. I put a dab of anti seize if it is in a high heat area bolts for exhausts etc I use Phillips Milk of magnesium, believe it or not we used it all the time on the engine bolts of Air Craft lol worked like a champ. Now if you are really really really bored and want to know http://www.robins.af.mil/shared/medi...091006-042.pdf

Will tell you all you would ever want to forget about torque and torque wrenches etc. Enjoy

Cypher
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