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Old 04-01-2014, 06:24 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by Brian B-P View Post
I have posed the same question myself, and never received a convincing answer.
I feel the same towards any concerns I had too. It seems the axles manufacturers put out service info that adequately covers their butts, and would remove them from any legal actions should something happen. I see the same thing with so many things these days. I know structural very well, and am a Civil Engineering Technologist, so not a full engineer who can stamp plans, and see how much overkill is designed into simple residential structure. It more than adequately covers the engineers butt, but often costs us (and in the end the customer) a lot more money than needed.

In rereading that paragraph, it seems that I feel the is a lot of butts being covered.
Oh the joys of living in a litigious time. :
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Old 04-01-2014, 09:21 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Bennett View Post
I feel the same towards any concerns I had too. It seems the axles manufacturers put out service info that adequately covers their butts, and would remove them from any legal actions should something happen. I see the same thing with so many things these days. I know structural very well, and am a Civil Engineering Technologist, so not a full engineer who can stamp plans, and see how much overkill is designed into simple residential structure. It more than adequately covers the engineers butt, but often costs us (and in the end the customer) a lot more money than needed.

In rereading that paragraph, it seems that I feel the is a lot of butts being covered.
Oh the joys of living in a litigious time. :

Helps RV shop owners make their boat payments...
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Old 04-01-2014, 10:54 AM   #23
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Helps RV shop owners make their boat payments...
LOL...truth!
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Old 04-01-2014, 08:02 PM   #24
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Wink

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Bennett View Post
...It more than adequately covers the engineers butt, but often costs us (and in the end the customer) a lot more money than needed.

In rereading that paragraph, it seems that I feel the is a lot of butts being covered.
Oh the joys of living in a litigious time. :
Hey I know from experience that in most cases you need to be conservative in a design, because there is usually someone who is going to use it for some application that was never intended. As for civil engineers covering their butts, mine is large enough that I have to be super conservative or else for sure something will be left exposed.
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Old 04-01-2014, 09:26 PM   #25
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I always figured it was a throwback to when trailers, pop-ups mostly, had those tiny little wheels, 12"?. Due to the small size they heated up much quicker and were more prone to going bad.

Of course I could be full of it too.
The size of the wheel and tire do make a difference. The bigger the wheel, the fewer revolutions are turned going the same distance.

Like any maintenance, it less expensive than damage to your RV.
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Old 04-02-2014, 05:54 AM   #26
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The size of the wheel and tire do make a difference. The bigger the wheel, the fewer revolutions are turned going the same distance.
And even more important, the fewer revolutions per minute going the same speed (which could be what you are implying). Those old trailers with tiny tires were notorious for bearings failing.
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Old 03-10-2015, 03:12 PM   #27
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Dexter's website says you still need to do "periodic" service, which I take it to mean you have to check the bearings yearly or every 10k as mentioned previously. What value "repacking" as mentioned in their video is between yearly servicing is anyone's guess.

I did mine per the video a couple years ago, and like Glenn also had grease ooze out and get on the tires and wheels up until I did a manual repacking a few months later.

Well now that ETI has been using the easy lube axles for awhile how have they been holding up, is lubing easy as they state or is there a mess for most people? Curious minds need to know.


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Old 03-10-2015, 04:06 PM   #28
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Well now that ETI has been using the easy lube axles for awhile how have they been holding up, is lubing easy as they state or is there a mess for most people? Curious minds need to know.
I would be interested, too... and I'm interested in how this feature is being used:
Do you change grease with the E-Z Lube fitting instead of doing the recommended maintenance? or
Do you change grease with the E-Z Lube fitting in addition to doing the recommended maintenance, thus changing the grease more often than recommended?
... or some other combination?

Do you flush all of the grease through as intended, or do you just "top up" the grease with a squirt?

I assume that as per Dexter Axle recommendations, E-Z Lube owners are flushing the grease with the E-Z Lube fitting after each time they immerse their Escape's hubs completely in water
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Old 03-10-2015, 04:29 PM   #29
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In theory, the E-Z Lube seems like a great idea. However, I was taught not to completely fill the hub with grease when repacking bearings. The E-Z Lube system "delivers" grease to the inner bearing. It would take a relatively huge volume of grease to fill the voids within the hub before grease being pumped in would be forced toward the outer bearing. So while it may sound good in theory, I personally believe it is best to repack bearings the old fashioned way, and by doing so, you can visually check the bearings as well as the brakes. Yes, it is more work, but it is done properly. Furthermore, immersion in water is not really a problem as grease is not water soluble and will remain on the rollers within the bearing. And if water can get in, it can also get out. However, immersion in salt water due to the corrosiveness of salt is problematic. Immersion is more of a problem with boat trailers. And honestly, if you use a good quality grease such as Lucas Red 'N Tacky, I have had no problems going 3 years/30,000 miles between packings on my various trailers with no detrimental effects. But as Donna D would say, YMMV.
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Old 03-10-2015, 05:06 PM   #30
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We have our bearings repacked each fall ,then put our trailer up on blocks to get weight off of the axle
for winter storage . About once a month in the winter I manually rotate the tires .At a cost of only $34 to have the bearings repacked it seems like cheap insurance to me.
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