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Old 04-21-2016, 09:30 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by Jim Bennett View Post
My concern with on line feeding two appliances, is would there be enough capacity for both on the highest heat. This was my reasoning behind separate connections. If there is enough capacity in the one line to feed the 44,000 BTU's (10,000 Dickinson Spitfire, 34,000 Camp Chef Ranger II), I would definitely go with one line.
That sounds like a valid reason, too. I notice that the supplier of that Y-connector (the Torjik QUICK-Y) has a 3/8" version called the Torjik QUICK-Y38 (rather than the base 1/4" version) that sounds like it would flow more freely, but from the photo it appears that they adapt the 3/8" connectors down to the same 1/4" manifold block... duh.

Low-pressure quick-connect hoses are usually 1/4" nominal diameter. For a shared hose, I would look for 3/8" nominal diameter. I know the local barbecue store sells 3/8" hoses with 1/4 MPT ends, so by adding fittings on each end 3/8" low-pressure extension hoses are available in a range of lengths. Even with the same connectors on the end as the smaller hose, it would be less restrictive. The output of an RV regulator normally goes into 3/8" line to handle the total required flow at low pressure; 1/4" is typically only used on the high-pressure side, and in these quick-connect appliance hoses.

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Originally Posted by C&G in FL View Post
I do not think it would be a problem, however, considering the inner diameter of the propane hose and the sizes of the orifaces in jets in the stove.
In a fluid transmission system, just like an electrical circuit, it isn't just the most restrictive component that matters. Each link in the chain adds resistance to flow and so drops pressure, just like with wire. The orifice is the controlling element, chosen to provide the right flow on the basis that it is supplied with 1"WC of propane pressure, so if upstream plumbing is too restrictive (even though it is less restrictive than the orifice), there won't be as much flow as intended.
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Old 04-21-2016, 10:13 PM   #32
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That sounds like a valid reason, too. I notice that the supplier of that Y-connector (the Torjik QUICK-Y) has a 3/8" version called the Torjik QUICK-Y38 (rather than the base 1/4" version) that sounds like it would flow more freely, but from the photo it appears that they adapt the 3/8" connectors down to the same 1/4" manifold block... duh.

Low-pressure quick-connect hoses are usually 1/4" nominal diameter. For a shared hose, I would look for 3/8" nominal diameter. I know the local barbecue store sells 3/8" hoses with 1/4 MPT ends, so by adding fittings on each end 3/8" low-pressure extension hoses are available in a range of lengths. Even with the same connectors on the end as the smaller hose, it would be less restrictive. The output of an RV regulator normally goes into 3/8" line to handle the total required flow at low pressure; 1/4" is typically only used on the high-pressure side, and in these quick-connect appliance hoses.


In a fluid transmission system, just like an electrical circuit, it isn't just the most restrictive component that matters. Each link in the chain adds resistance to flow and so drops pressure, just like with wire. The orifice is the controlling element, chosen to provide the right flow on the basis that it is supplied with 1"WC of propane pressure, so if upstream plumbing is too restrictive (even though it is less restrictive than the orifice), there won't be as much flow as intended.
That is absolutely true. Laminar flow is affected by fricton between the fluid or gas and the wall of the pipe/hose, and the smaller the diameter, the larger the percentage of the liquid or gas that will be affected by that friction. And the longer the pipe/hose, the greater the resistance to flow. Gas, however, is less dense than a liquid and the friction has somewhat less of an affect. Gas mains are a lot smaller than water mains serving any populated area. And in the practical application which Jim is addressing, it would be my expectation that he might be running the grill at its highest setting, but it is unlikely he would be running both burners of the Ranger Ii at the highest setting. Those puppies put out a large amount of heat. They will boil water rather quickly and I have found that most of our actual cooking is at or below 1/3 of what would be the stove's maximum flame. In order to simmer anything, we have found the burner must be adjusted way down. Then again, 85% to 90% of our cooking is done on the grill. We do not cook multicourse meals. I know some people prepare more elaborate meals, and might find a need for the grill and both burners at the same time, but I really doubt the Ranger II would be at the maximum output.
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Old 04-21-2016, 11:15 PM   #33
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.....but from the photo it appears that they adapt the 3/8" connectors down to the same 1/4" manifold block... duh.

Low-pressure quick-connect hoses are usually 1/4" nominal diameter. For a shared hose, I would look for 3/8" nominal diameter. I know the local barbecue store sells 3/8" hoses with 1/4 MPT ends, so by adding fittings on each end 3/8" low-pressure extension hoses are available in a range of lengths. Even with the same connectors on the end as the smaller hose, it would be less restrictive. The output of an RV regulator normally goes into 3/8" line to handle the total required flow at low pressure; 1/4" is typically only used on the high-pressure side, and in these quick-connect appliance hoses.
That certainly does look like 1/4" nipples to the manifold. There still would be a bit of an advantage to using a 3/8" hose off the trailer, even if there is a short piece of 1/4", as even though there is a flow restriction in that 1/4" piece, there would be less in the 3/8" line compared to the 1/4". Pretty minor though.

I would bet Escape uses a 1/4" tap off the main 3/8" line to feed the QC, which would render any use of 3/8" line beyond it nearly useless.

On the 5.0, it would be quite easy to tap off the LP side of the regulator and run an extra QC though. If one was to use a couple moderate length hoses for most occasions, then if distance is needed, run one appliance at twice the distance out. We do mostly cook by the trailer, even if the table is a ways away. I like to set up with some wind and rain protection most of the time.

I actually foresee putting the stove or BBQ under the loft sometimes when raining. Does anyone with a 5.0 do this?
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Old 04-21-2016, 11:32 PM   #34
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.....
I bought 2 Camco QC hoses .......
Hey Greg


this model?

Amazon.com: Camco 57282 10' Propane Quick-Connect Hose: Automotive

thanks

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Old 04-21-2016, 11:55 PM   #35
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Hey John,
I checked my Amazon orders and that's the one I bought. You got to see the setup at my trailer at Quartzsite, but not sure if you were thinking about QC setup then. How's lil Camper doing?
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Old 04-22-2016, 12:02 AM   #36
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Hey John,
I checked my Amazon orders and that's the one I bought. You got to see the setup at my trailer at Quartzsite, but not sure if you were thinking about QC setup then. How's lil Camper doing?
Thanks man

Lil Camper is great.

Hope you all are well.

I am in full time research frenzy - as you wisely predicted would happen to me.

;-)

Thanks. Much appreciated for all the info. Always. :-)
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Old 04-22-2016, 06:19 AM   #37
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I actually foresee putting the stove or BBQ under the loft sometimes when raining. Does anyone with a 5.0 do this?
I find it extremely uncomfortable to try to stand under the loft. I am 5'9" (@ 1.75 m) tall and have to "crouch" when underneath. And I wouldn't want to reach under the loft while standing in the rain to cook. So if it rains, we either nuke something, eat something that does not need to be cooked, go out to a restaurant, or use the awning for shelter (typically, in that order). I have made a small modification using two stainless steel I-bolts and the king pin that allows me to put a clothesline under the loft. It allows towels and bathing suits to continue drying, or at least not get soaking wet again should it rain. For us, anyway, it is the best use for the space under the loft.
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Old 04-22-2016, 08:45 AM   #38
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Originally Posted by C&G in FL View Post
I find it extremely uncomfortable to try to stand under the loft. I am 5'9" (@ 1.75 m) tall and have to "crouch" when underneath. And I wouldn't want to reach under the loft while standing in the rain to cook. So if it rains, we either nuke something, eat something that does not need to be cooked, go out to a restaurant, or use the awning for shelter (typically, in that order). I have made a small modification using two stainless steel I-bolts and the king pin that allows me to put a clothesline under the loft. It allows towels and bathing suits to continue drying, or at least not get soaking wet again should it rain. For us, anyway, it is the best use for the space under the loft.
I almost always use the BBQ on the ground, so need to crouch anyway. My young knees are good with that for now anyway. I could definitely see it being handy for stowing or hanging stuff out of the rain.

We used to use the awning rafters for hanging towels to dry, but this will not be an option with the new awning, so under the loft would be a really good place, especially when wet out.

Our typical cooking eating scenario if it is raining, in order, is under the awning, inside, in our Clam shelter. For lunch it is not usually cooked. We didn't and won't have a microwave, and a round trip to a restaurant is usually an hour plus eating time, so that is out.
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Old 04-22-2016, 05:03 PM   #39
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For those of you who have put male QD fittings on your grill, stove, or firepit and if those fittings do not have a cover, the large sized caps for Closet Maid shelving sold at most building supply stores (Lowe's, Home Depot, etc.) fit over the business end nicely. They are inexpensive, easily replaced if lost, and the keep small critters out of the appliance when in storage.
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Old 04-22-2016, 10:27 PM   #40
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Thanks, Carl. I've got a few of those hanging around my workshop and will put them to use.
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