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Old 07-12-2015, 10:37 AM   #31
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I do a fair amount of hunting/canoe camping with my old town Penobscot. It's designed to handle up to 1200lbs and it handles better when it's full. There's a lake that borders Maine and New Hampshire called umbagog lake that's ten miles long with a few primitive campsites along its shores. The one I frequent is on an island in a cove that's beautiful and very remote.
Emile,
Awesome photo.
That's one of the grand things about early-morning (usually fishing in my case), the way the morning is presented to us, first with the grey streaks, then how everything slowly changes from black and grey to color.
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Old 07-12-2015, 12:08 PM   #32
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If you're always going to be on the water with your wife and you decide to go with a flat water Kayak I would recommend a tandem vs. two separate kayaks. My wife and I trialed a pair of single kayaks and found we couldn't be close enough together to easily conversate and were having to yell at each other. I think if you're primarily going to go out together it makes more sense to be in the same boat. Also some tandems allow the seats to move such that it can be piloted by a single person if desired.
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Old 07-12-2015, 12:29 PM   #33
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Another choice would be an Adirondack Guide boat. Maine hunting guides deveolped them for thier clients way back when. A kind of a Canoe/ row boat, they carry heavy loads, get more stable the more they get loaded. And light weight for portaging. The boat is a comprimise of speed and stability . The skin-on frame adaptations are light enough to be car topped. And they look really sexy on the water.
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Old 07-12-2015, 02:00 PM   #34
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If you're always going to be on the water with your wife and you decide to go with a flat water Kayak I would recommend a tandem vs. two separate kayaks. My wife and I trialed a pair of single kayaks and found we couldn't be close enough together to easily conversate and were having to yell at each other. I think if you're primarily going to go out together it makes more sense to be in the same boat..
Two in one boat also offers the possibility of one person doing more of the paddling work than the other (without resorting to a tow rope), which can be helpful where abilities differ. Of course, this can also be a disadvantage...

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Also some tandems allow the seats to move such that it can be piloted by a single person if desired.
Interesting - I had not seen that. Of course this is normal for canoes (at least those which are symmetric, having identical bow and stern).
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Old 07-12-2015, 07:12 PM   #35
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You want a craft that is both comfortable and one that tracks well.
Actually, for whitewater paddling, you don't want a boat that tracks well. You want no keel and a lot of rocker so that the boat can twist and turn around obstructions, like a rock garden.
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Old 07-12-2015, 09:17 PM   #36
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Canoe choices

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Actually, for whitewater paddling, you don't want a boat that tracks well. You want no keel and a lot of rocker so that the boat can twist and turn around obstructions, like a rock garden.

Right. Depends on where you will be paddling. Around here most of the rivers are very calm and glassy. So we went with a longer kayak with a slightly deeper keel for ease of tracking. When I was living in Utah we spent some time kayaking on some very serious whitewater Rapids. For those you need a short kayak with no keel, that can slip, rock and turn sideways on a dime. I would say though that for most recreational infrequent paddlers, a canoe or kayak that tracks well on smoother water is the way to go.
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Old 07-12-2015, 10:21 PM   #37
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In Texas, if you dont have a motor on the canoe, there is no registration required
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Old 07-13-2015, 09:30 AM   #38
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[QUOTE=craiginpetaluma;100552]Another choice would be an Adirondack Guide boat. Maine hunting guides deveolped them for thier clients way back when.

The Adirondacks are in New York. I think you wanted to say NY hunting guides.
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Old 07-13-2015, 09:34 AM   #39
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I have done lots of paddling over the years, and still continue to do some. This weekend we just planned a 5 day trip to Murtle Lake, in Wells Grey Provincial Park in BC, for September.

I have kayaked a bunch in the past, both white water and sea kayaks. Both are great for their respective uses. However, I now MUCH prefer to canoe. I find them way more comfortable in that I can change positions as I need, I can take more luxury stuff (well, luxury for backcountry travel), they allow more access to gear as you paddle, with my cameras and lenses at hand. Oh yeah, and Jasper can travel in a canoe.

I have 3 canoes, a fast asymmetrical tripper for flat water travel, which is fast and and paddles easily. I have a river boat with lots of rocker, built tough, which manometers big rapids nicely. My third canoe has not hit the water yet, it is a cedar stripper, a solo tripper for lakes, which I hope to have finished for our September paddle.

The link baglo posted explains the different uses for canoes quite well. If you haven't paddled a lot, and are only looking for something for day trips, something that is fairly stable and tracks well would be advisable. I know my lake tripper makes a poor day paddling boat, as it is designed for speed (a rather relative term), and is very wobbly when not loaded. Others like a Prospecter design, are a fairly stable canoe, and all round performer.

If one does not have the space to put a canoe on the tow vehicle, like with a 5.0, I would not hesitate to get an inflatable canoe. I have paddled in one on a river that was quite nice. I am not certain how much of a pain it is to inflate or deflate though. There are also good folding canoes, and lots of people have used them for fly in paddles.

I have only paddled in two states, Idaho and Oregon, but there were no regulations I know of.

Bumpy water;
With my brother and niece



With my son and me



Smooth water;
Lisa and Jsper



Lisa

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Old 07-13-2015, 10:10 AM   #40
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I think that we paddle some of the same places as Jim B.



You do have to select your canoe or kayak based on the type of paddling you want to do. For example, my solo whitewater canoe (next pic) would be terrible to paddle for more than a short distance on flat water, but it is great on whitewater.


Canoes are also more conducive to taking the entire family (or grandkids) out with you for a fun paddle. Here is one of mine from many years ago.

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