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Old 10-12-2016, 09:39 AM   #21
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Been using this one for years as well , but it is a 2 person job. With the E-Z winterizing option on the Escape, just put the hose in the container and turn on your pump, works easy and one person operation.
I use the same pump and manage to do it by myself.
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Old 10-12-2016, 01:34 PM   #22
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... I do not think you can control the pressure without the tank set up thus you may run the risk of too much pressure in your system.
Good point - if you run an uncontrolled compressor into a plumbing with all valves closed for too long, the pressure will get high... possibly too high.

One solution is to not run the compressor unless at least one faucet is open.
Another is to use a compressor which allows you to set a target pressure: it turns off when that pressure is reached (I would set something like 60 psi as a safety limit).
It is also possible to fill a portable air tank with a small compressor, but if that results in the compressor running for too long in an attempt to pressurize the tank, the compressor will overheat (assuming you don't have an expensive continuous-duty compressor).
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Old 10-12-2016, 01:41 PM   #23
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Air is mostly nitrogen, so mostly the same thing (same molecules) as pure nitrogen. The "nitrogen" gas used for tires is sometimes pure dry nitrogen, but is usually just air with some of the oxygen and carbon dioxide removed, so it's still a mix but with a greater proportion of nitrogen. The difference between nitrogen gas (N2) and oxygen gas (O2) can't possibly be important to diffusion of gas through solid rubber. If gas molecule size really was important to tire deflation, they would use carbon dioxide (CO2), not nitrogen (N2). Tire pressure changes due to temperature changes, and also drops due to leaking valves, and leaking past imperfect bead seals.

What is useful is having less moisture in the air, and the "nitrogen" used for tire inflation is probably drier than the air from an average shop compressor, which in turn is probably a bit drier than the air that goes into a portable compressor (and then into your tires). Pure dry nitrogen purchased in cylinders from a gas supply house would have essentially zero moisture (that's what racers used years ago that started this whole nitrogen inflation idea). Less moisture means less pressure change with large temperature changes.

Edmunds has a pretty good article about nitrogen for tire inflation.

You do get pretty green valve caps from Costco when they fill tires with nitrogen. My van's tires came with a set.
I agree except the CO2 is corrosive to steel (with humidity) so a high concentration would cause a lot more problems. Oxygen is corrosive also and Nitrogen is a preservative. I assume that if there is a very tiny leak that the smaller molecule gas would leak out first which would increase the ratio of N2 but at a lower pressure. Frequently refilling with N2, free from Costco, will further increase the concentration in the tires.
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Old 10-12-2016, 01:46 PM   #24
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I have several pumps used to inflate air mattresses. One is 110v and it really puts out a lot of air. Seems like it, or a shop vac blowing air could also do the job.
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Old 10-12-2016, 02:02 PM   #25
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I hooked up the Viair to the trailer today. First I let the water pump run in the trailer for a few seconds to get all the water out of it. Then I let the pressure get to 50 lbs. and shut it off. I turned a tap in the trailer and the water spurted out. Shut it off and built up the pressure again. I repeated this for every tap, toilet and outside shower. Half way through the process I closed the valves to the hot water tank which I had drained previously. When I was finished draining I put antifreeze in all the traps. I took the drain plug out of the drained hot water tank, at the end, and there was a lot of air pressure built up in it. Hopefully I got everything.
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Old 10-12-2016, 02:08 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by Brian B-P View Post
Good point - if you run an uncontrolled compressor into a plumbing with all valves closed for too long, the pressure will get high... possibly too high.

One solution is to not run the compressor unless at least one faucet is open.
Another is to use a compressor which allows you to set a target pressure: it turns off when that pressure is reached (I would set something like 60 psi as a safety limit).
It is also possible to fill a portable air tank with a small compressor, but if that results in the compressor running for too long in an attempt to pressurize the tank, the compressor will overheat (assuming you don't have an expensive continuous-duty compressor).
Figured as much. From Reace a couple months ago when I was looking for a new water regulator...

"The water system in the trailer has been tested to 100 psi, however it is not recommended to use water pressure in the system that high for too long. Most water pressure regulators bring the pressure down to around 50 psi which should be more than adequate."

The Viair 300P, which is what I have, supposedly does 150psi and can't have the airflow restricted without damaging the internal valves in it. I'll have to make sure I leave at least one faucet open whenever the compressor is running.

Sounds like an accident waiting to happen.

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Old 10-12-2016, 02:08 PM   #27
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Hopefully I got everything.
That's why I put my air compressor in the back shed and went back to using antifreeze. I could never be sure.
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Old 10-12-2016, 02:13 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by SFDavis50 View Post
I have several pumps used to inflate air mattresses. One is 110v and it really puts out a lot of air. Seems like it, or a shop vac blowing air could also do the job.
Since you want a lot of volume and don't need much pressure, I agree that an inflator - rather than a compressor intended for tires - might be a better match. Connecting it to the water inlet fitting would likely take some clever plumbing.
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Old 10-12-2016, 02:17 PM   #29
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The Viair 300P, which is what I have, supposedly does 150psi and can't have the airflow restricted without damaging the internal valves in it.
That's interesting. It looks like a pressure switch, rather than a regulator, is needed to control the output of this compressor. It's too bad that it doesn't have a user-adjustable pressure switch.

Looking at the Viair 300P owner's manual, it looks like it may not have an internal pressure-activated switch at all, just a thermal overload. I also don't see a warning about valve damage, only an issue that it will build up excessive pressure if the output is blocked... but that's still a concern.
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Old 10-12-2016, 03:46 PM   #30
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I got the info about messing up the compressor from Viair's Chat people, who ever they are. That said...

I just used it to blow out the lines, making sure I left at least one faucet open. Worked as good as the big compressor in the shop. Provided more constant airflow then the shops when set to 30 psi, no need to let it build up.

FWIW, this compressor draws 30A, hence the need to connect directly to the battery of the truck.
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