For those who must have one.... - Page 4 - Escape Trailer Owners Community

Go Back   Escape Trailer Owners Community > Escape Tech > Escape Systems | Water, Waste, Charging & Propane
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-10-2016, 07:01 AM   #31
Senior Member
 
padlin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Southwick, Massachusetts
Trailer: 5.0 TA #6, 2012 F150 EB
Posts: 3,361
Your kind of on the other end of the generator use spectrum from most of the rest of us. Can't imagine the little 1-2k generators are designed for 8 hours a day usage. Buying one to use half a dozen times a year for 2 or 3 hours is a different ball game.
__________________

__________________
Happy Motoring
Bob
padlin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2016, 09:56 AM   #32
Senior Member
 
KarenH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Bellingham, Washington
Trailer: 2013 Escape 15A
Posts: 1,776
Send a message via Skype™ to KarenH
Quote:
Originally Posted by padlin View Post
Can't imagine the little 1-2k generators are designed for 8 hours a day usage.
I've never understood this concept. Isn't an hour of generator time an hour of generator time, i.e., isn't eight one-hour run times the same as one eight-hour run time? Maybe someone can help me understand why it's not.

By the way, (and I know small generators are the topic) I use a Honda 6500 at my cabin (which is off grid) and I've had nothing but good to say about Honda...in twenty years, I'm only on my second one with almost 6000 hours.
__________________

__________________
Karen Hulford
2013 Escape 15A, "Egbert"
Ford 150 XLT 5.8L
Bellingham, Washington
KarenH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2016, 10:59 AM   #33
Senior Member
 
Patandlinda's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Ventura County, California
Trailer: 2013 19 Escape
Posts: 3,465
Quote:
Originally Posted by StarvingHyena View Post
Small gas generators ... oh boy ... since I have been living off the grid for more than 15 years, I have been through a lot of them. Here is my call and I hope I'm not stepping on anyone's toes here:


Honda - generally have been the worst of the bunch. Very expensive compared to the rest. Maybe a little quieter ... maybe. Much more temperamental and what makes me want to throw them "under the bus" is their maintenance schedule. Their manual says to remove the cylinder head and exhaust manifold every 300 hours for de-carbonizing. That's about every month or two for me and my usage. Shop rates for that work were enough that I could buy a new generator every 6 - 9 months. Had 1 - 1000 watt and 2 - 2000 watt before I got a little smarter. If you are using your trailer just a couple weeks per year, then the Honda might be a good choice.


Then went threw a series of Yamaha generators. All along I have been asking the generators (all of the inverter style) to power a 40 amp battery charger at 12 volts (max 480 watts). Should be a piece of cake for a 1000 watt generator ... well it was't. The 1000 watt generator always sounded lugged down and sure enough it lasted about 2 months beyond its warranty. Perhaps the Honda 1000 was a little more honest in its output rating as it didn't sound like it was struggling as much but it still didn't last any longer. Then I reacted to the lugging sound and tried a 2000 watt. Much better... fuel economy was still within acceptable parameters. But Yamaha's problem is that its cost is almost as much as the Honda in purchase price. Too much! Yes a more robust engine but still too much $.


Next I tried a Suburu / Robin industrial generator. Was heavy but lasted well beyond all the others. However it has an important drawback .... parts availability and I'm pretty sure its ignition system was made in North Korea. The coil went out and is integral with the spark plug cap. After a number of months I got a new part but haven't put it back in service. Currently considered a back up. With all that said .... I'd buy another. I think.


Then Costco started selling "Smarter Tools" generators powered by Yamaha 2000i. I really like these generators (so far). Have two of them which I alternate and both have proven to be very reliable. Costco is no longer selling them, unfortunately, but I see that Amazon is carrying them. Costco, about a year + ago sold them for close to $600 and Amazon has them now for $650. Fair enough ... when I need another gen, Amazon it is. These are good generators and I recommend them.


I'd be afraid of the Powerstroke. It's profile, and that is all I'm going on, looks like a Generac knock off and I would not touch a Generac with a 20' pole. I think Generac is a cheap subsidiary of an all ready way to cheaply built motor by Briggs and Stratton. Thumbs down!!!!


Here is the best way to make your generator last. Yamaha makes an hour meter to fit their generators ... its an option and I'm sorry that I don't have a model number. Its a piece of plastic about 1 1/4" by 3/4" with an led readout and a button. Push button and you get RPM, push again and you get an hour meter reading .... as in how long you engine has been running since you first got the meter hooked up. Attachment is with two sheet metal screws into the plastic case near the spark plug (will not void the warranty) and by drilling about a 1/16" hole through the case. Thread a single strand wire through hole and wrap wire around the spark plug hot wire. It is an inductive pickup. With knowledge of engine running time you can determine when to change the oil. Since most of these small engines only hold between .3 and <.5 quarts for 50 - 90 hours of run time, its critical you change the oil at prescribed frequency or sooner. I can change my Smart Tool / Yamaha oil in less than 10 minutes.


These meters would work on any engine with a spark plug. Worth the $35 easy at a Yamaha dealership - haven't tried Amazon or Ebay.


Sorry I got so long winded but I have been meaning to write this for a long time.




Happy Camping,


Tom
Wow Tom hope that isn't my case . My Honda generator is one I bought 1992 after I sold a old truck . It is a 1000 watt . No inverter on this one . The case is metal not plastic . It sat for 20 years and looks brand new . I drained the gas after I had used it once . Then bought our trailer, put fresh gas in it , changed the oil and it started right up and now use it . I read if you can find one of these old ones grab it . On our bikes have Subaru motors now for almost 4 years . Start every time . They say made in Japan on them . Have a Honda lawn motor for about 9 years . Starts every time never a problem . I think in your situation buying the best you can and doing regular maintence is all you can do . Pat
Patandlinda is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2016, 12:04 PM   #34
Senior Member
 
padlin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Southwick, Massachusetts
Trailer: 5.0 TA #6, 2012 F150 EB
Posts: 3,361
Quote:
Originally Posted by KarenH View Post
I've never understood this concept. Isn't an hour of generator time an hour of generator time, i.e., isn't eight one-hour run times the same as one eight-hour run time? Maybe someone can help me understand why it's not.

By the way, (and I know small generators are the topic) I use a Honda 6500 at my cabin (which is off grid) and I've had nothing but good to say about Honda...in twenty years, I'm only on my second one with almost 6000 hours.
I'd think 8 hours of straight run time is easier on the generator as you only have to start it once as opposed to 8 times. However, I was getting at the idea of running a small generator for 8 hrs day, day after day.
__________________
Happy Motoring
Bob
padlin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2016, 12:23 PM   #35
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: North Van., British Columbia
Trailer: 2014 Escape 19
Posts: 2,888
Quote:
Originally Posted by StarvingHyena View Post

All along I have been asking the generators (all of the inverter style) to power a 40 amp battery charger at 12 volts (max 480 watts).

Tom
Maybe another way to do the same thing is the route I took on my boat to do the same thing. I took a small Kubota diesel engine and marinized it. But they sell ones that are air/self contained water cooled. They're called "sign board" engines. They'e meant to sit on a remote mountain top and run for a long time, like a year.

I put a 120 amp. alternator on mine and never lacked battery charging power for my large battery bank.

Ron
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 17-07-2015 2-53-08 PM_0001_resize.JPG (368.0 KB, 10 views)
Ron in BC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2016, 03:39 PM   #36
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Trailer: 1979 Boler B1700
Posts: 8,420
Quote:
Originally Posted by KarenH View Post
I've never understood this concept. Isn't an hour of generator time an hour of generator time, i.e., isn't eight one-hour run times the same as one eight-hour run time? Maybe someone can help me understand why it's not.
Maybe it's not (see below) but even if it is the same... I think the assumption is that these very small generators are not expected to be used for more than a few hundred hours in their entire life, as that would be decades of use for most buyers. Run it 8 hours a day, and you run out of life in weeks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by padlin View Post
I'd think 8 hours of straight run time is easier on the generator as you only have to start it once as opposed to 8 times.
Maybe, because starting is hard on an engine, and running with cold oil is bad. On the other hand, continuous running under any significant load is hard, too, if the engine isn't designed and equipped to keep up with the required heat dissipation. Many types of equipment have a specified duty cycle - how long it can run at a time, and and how much of the time it can be running. For instance, if something had a 50% duty cycle and maximum 30 minute run time, that would mean you would need to shut it down after half and hour, and not start it again for another half an hour.

These small engines are splash-lubricated - they don't even have an oil pump, let alone an oil cooler, and with air cooling of the engine overheating the oil is a real concern. I don't think they're intended to run continuously. As Tom mentioned, some expect more from a given size of engine than others; that may be to improve fuel efficiency, but it is probably also to improve durability if run continuously at rated output.
Brian B-P is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2016, 02:34 AM   #37
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Juneau, Alaska
Trailer: 2015 17A - Ready for 4th Maiden Voyage
Posts: 492
Quote:
Originally Posted by padlin View Post
Your kind of on the other end of the generator use spectrum from most of the rest of us. Can't imagine the little 1-2k generators are designed for 8 hours a day usage. Buying one to use half a dozen times a year for 2 or 3 hours is a different ball game.

Hi Bob,
I think you are right ... my generator use IS in a different ball game. However, if a generator can stand up to my high hour everyday use, it will probably last a very long time as a typical RVer use rate. I believe that is what the Honda engineers had in mind for their inverter designs.... for the RVers amongst us.

Really hoping to help,
Tom
__________________
"Make America Think Again"
Seen on sign from the Woman's March on Washington DC
StarvingHyena is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2016, 03:26 AM   #38
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Juneau, Alaska
Trailer: 2015 17A - Ready for 4th Maiden Voyage
Posts: 492
Quote:
Originally Posted by KarenH View Post
I've never understood this concept. Isn't an hour of generator time an hour of generator time, i.e., isn't eight one-hour run times the same as one eight-hour run time? Maybe someone can help me understand why it's not.

By the way, (and I know small generators are the topic) I use a Honda 6500 at my cabin (which is off grid) and I've had nothing but good to say about Honda...in twenty years, I'm only on my second one with almost 6000 hours.
Hi Karen,
In my generator comments and especially about Honda generators were about the inverter designs. I'd bet your 6500 Honda generator is an open case static output generator. A different animal than I was talking about.

The inverter design (Honda) I think was designed for the casual RVer or camper trying to put a fresh charge on 1 or maybe 2 automotive lead acid car batteries. Translates into relatively light duty.

The inverter designs initially probably run at about 3000 rpm until the battery charger cuts down the amount of power needed ... usually near 80% charge of the batteries, then the RPM drops to something like 700 - 1000 RPM and will stay there until the battery charger cuts off the need for power or greatly reduces it. Here the generator will idle and this is the point where my generators fail me due to high rates of carbonization in the cylinder head and/or exhaust manifold followed after time with burnt valves and seats. Engine funeral follows.

I think I aggravate the situation by having a larger battery bank than the inverter engineers had in mind. My battery bank ... 6 - 8 large deep cycle car batteries come up to 80% charge pretty quickly but need hours at idle speed to top up = carbonization.

Karen, if you are getting 6000 hours out of your generator that is remarkable! You must be doing something very right .... please share. I'm glad you are getting such good use!

Tom
__________________
"Make America Think Again"
Seen on sign from the Woman's March on Washington DC
StarvingHyena is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2016, 08:20 AM   #39
Senior Member
 
Bobbito's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Surrey, British Columbia
Trailer: 2015 Escape 21
Posts: 526
Just a note about the size of generator. I almost bought a 1000 watt Honda because it would easily charge my 2 deep cycle 6 volt batteries. Instead I got the 2000 watt and believe it is a lot quieter because it isn't running at higher RPM like the 1000 would have to. Plus if I disconnect the batteries the Honda 2000 will run the air conditioner, according to Reace. I have owned a couple of Honda powered small engines and find them very reliable and long lasting for my use.

Bob K
Bobbito is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2016, 04:24 PM   #40
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Denver, Colorado
Trailer: Ultralite
Posts: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marky View Post
From what I've read, there are other generators that use the Yamaha motor. I've also read that the Yamaha engine is quieter and lasts longer than most generators because they use a special metal sleeve in their cylinders. I don't know how true this is. It's on the Internet so it must be true! Lol!
Maybe someone with more experience that has worked on one can chime in and enlighten us about this.
Marky
I cant decide whether to get the Yamaha or Honda 2000 gen. They seem about the same...any ideas?
__________________

nickh is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off






» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:36 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2012 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.