'Trickle' charging two 6V batteries - Page 3 - Escape Trailer Owners Community

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Old 12-17-2016, 05:32 PM   #21
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6V battery charging

Lead acid batteries do not have memory... There are really two types of lead acid batteries: those designed for high current instantaneous loads and the "Deep Cycle" which are designed for moderate continuous loads. Both designs have a finite ability to be completely discharged with the deep cycle being more resistant to damage when it is completely discharged, hence the name "Deep Cycle". Is is good practice to minimize the occurrences of full discharge if you want to get the maximum life from any lead acid battery. Slow trickle charge electronic chargers with overcharge protection and "Float Mode" which operate in the range of 750 Milliamps to 1.5 Amps work best at charging and maintaining charge on stored batteries. Chargers of this type could take days to bring perfectly good batteries back to the "Green-Lite" status so you shouldn't be in a hurry. Remove the batteries if possible and set them on a bench while storage charging. Do not leave the batteries on a cement or dirt floor. Spend the extra money (not a lot with these small electronic chargers) and charge the batteries independently. I use the "Battery Tender Jr." which puts out 750 Milliamps and is fully automatic (but it will take a while)...
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Old 12-17-2016, 06:57 PM   #22
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All good information, Charlie, except for this detail:
Quote:
Originally Posted by chowlee View Post
Do not leave the batteries on a cement or dirt floor.
That's been obsolete for a very long time.
From the Trojan FAQ:
Quote:
1. What are some common myths associated with batteries?
  • ...
  • Storing a battery on concrete will discharge it quicker- Long ago, when battery cases were made out of natural rubber, this was true. Now, however, battery cases are made of polypropylene or other modern materials that allow a battery to be stored anywhere. A battery’s rate of discharge is affected by its construction, its age, and the ambient temperature. The main issue with storing on concrete is that if the battery leaks, the concrete will be damaged.
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Old 12-17-2016, 08:04 PM   #23
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6V Battery charging

Thanks for the correction, Brian. That rule came from my engineer dad (yeah, Ill throw him under the bus)...
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Old 12-17-2016, 08:16 PM   #24
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Concrete is cold. Wood or something else, not so much, right?
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Old 12-17-2016, 08:29 PM   #25
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Concrete is cold. Wood or something else, not so much, right?
Depends on the temperature.
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Old 12-17-2016, 09:10 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by float5 View Post
Concrete is cold. Wood or something else, not so much, right?
Any material can be any temperature. If you have a concrete floor which is colder than the air in the room, then an insulating material between the battery and the floor would keep the battery from getting as cold... but is that the situation? Even if it is, as long as the temperature of the concrete is at or above the freezing point (of water: 0 C or 32 F), then no matter what the state of charge of the battery it is safe. Colder (but still above freezing) is actually better, because it reduces the rate of self-discharge.

A concrete basement floor is probably the most ideal temperature of any point in a house, for storage of a lead-acid battery. Even in a garage, if water doesn't freeze on the floor around the battery, the floor's temperature is not a problem.
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Old 12-17-2016, 11:15 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by chowlee View Post
Thanks for the correction, Brian. That rule came from my engineer dad (yeah, Ill throw him under the bus)...
Ufer Ground.

Your engineer dad was very correct in the past. Concrete is an efficient electrical ground and a leaking battery or older rubber cased battery could drain itself sitting on a concrete floor.

(from Wikipedia)

Concrete is naturally basic (has high pH). Ufer observed this meant that it had a ready supply of ions and so provides a better electrical ground than almost any type of soil. Ufer also found that the soil around the concrete became "doped", and its subsequent rise in pH caused the overall impedance of the soil itself to be reduced. The concrete enclosure also increases the surface area of the connection between the grounding conductor and the surrounding soil, which also helps to reduce the overall impedance of the connection.

Ufer's original grounding scheme used copper encased in concrete. However, the high pH of concrete often causes the copper to chip and flake. For this reason, steel is often used instead of copper.

When homes are built on concrete slabs, it is common practice to bring one end of the rebar up out of the concrete at a convenient location to make an easy connection point for the grounding electrode.[4]

Ufer grounds, when present, are preferred over the use of grounding rods. In some areas (like Des Moines, Iowa) Ufer grounds are required for all residential and commercial buildings.[5] The conductivity of the soil usually determines if Ufer grounds are required in any particular area.

An Ufer ground of specified minimum dimensions is recognized by the U.S. National Electrical Code as a grounding electrode.[6] The grounding conductors must have sufficient cover by the concrete to prevent damage when dissipating high-current lightning strikes.[7]

A disadvantage of Ufer grounds is that the moisture in the concrete can flash into steam during a lightning strike or similar high energy fault condition. This can crack the surrounding concrete and damage the building foundation.[8]
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Old 12-18-2016, 12:33 AM   #28
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I recall in the early 1970's, my high school auto shop teacher, who used to restore cars from the 1920's and 30's, had a really old lead-lined wooden-cased battery that he would show us students taking his shop classes. He told us that it was those old wooden-cased batteries that were the basis for the antiquated recommendation/warning to not store lead-acid batteries on the ground, even on concrete. The wooden case would absorb moisture and deteriorate, weakening the strength of the wood and its ability to help hold all of the heavy internal parts in their proper position needed to function. Modern plastic-cased batteries - no moisture absorption, no case weakening, no problem. At least that's what he told us, and I have no reason to doubt him....
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Old 12-18-2016, 10:28 AM   #29
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Between the soon to be parked in my driveway 5.0TA, the boat, the tractor and other
possessions (some mine, some family members) and all the batteries both 6V and 12V I think I'll spring for a charging station rather than a bunch of independent chargers... Maybe Santa could deliver


NOCO Genius G4 6V/12V 4.4A 4-Bank UltraSafe Smart Battery Charger
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Old 12-20-2016, 12:20 AM   #30
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Okay, you electrical engineers out there, is there really such a thing as "desulfinating" a marginal battery to make it perform better? Many manufacturers of battery maintainers touted the ability of their higher priced products to desulfinate batteries - even provide descriptions of how the process works. But some authoritative-appearing web sites state there is no such thing as "desulfination"- it's just a marketing gimic. What's the real deal?
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