Two 6 volt batteries - parallel/series - Page 4 - Escape Trailer Owners Community

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Old 10-12-2016, 11:05 PM   #31
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In my case, the battery box has two large open hoods for the cables to the terminals. My solar controller ( for the portable 40 watt panels ) is extremely basic. No switches. If I were fearing a spark, it would be from the alligator clips that attach to the battery terminals.
Since I have two panels, I have a spare controller in any case.
I'm thinking I'll just lay the controller on top of the battery and loosely lay the battery box lid on top. There will be plenty of ventilation and the controller will be sheltered from the rain.
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Old 10-13-2016, 04:50 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by MyronL View Post
Replaced the green AWG6 wire with AWG2, to the frame and, between the battery terminals.
Great size for the combined current of all loads.
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Old 10-14-2016, 11:23 AM   #33
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Originally Posted by Vermilye View Post
There are some advantages with going with larger than required wire. It takes voltage to push lots (well, actually, any) amps through a wire. The term is voltage drop, and it takes place all throughout the chain, including within the batteries, the wiring, and connectors, fuses, and within the inverter itself.

At low currents, the amount of voltage drop is rarely a problem, but as you get close to the rating of the wire some start to show up. Some wire is rated at 90C or higher, hot enough to concern some, particularly if you are using connectors, switches & fuse blocks that are not rated for the same or higher temperature.

To me, the real problem with voltage drop is the inverter shutting down while you still have usable battery capacity. If there is enough voltage drop that the input at the inverter is below 11 volts, most will alarm. Below 10 volts and most shut down. If your battery was really at 10 volts, that would be good since it prevents permanent damage. The reality is some of the voltage drop is in the battery, some in the wire, some in the connections, and some in the inverter. As soon as you shut the inverter off, the voltage at the inverter input jumps back to near the battery voltage, usually much higher than it was when under load.

Going with larger than required wire size will let you run the inverter longer or at times the batteries are down from full. Since most of the work is running the wiring, going with oversized wire will help prevent hassles in the long run. This is the reason Xantrex recommends at least #0 wire for its inverter installations even though their inverters under 2000 watts don't require it by code for short cable runs.
Very well said. This is what Brian B-P and I were driving at, but this was very convincing as to why you should have larger wire. A partial inverter load with full batteries isn't when you are going to have a problem. It will show itself with batteries down and a larger load on the inverter. I'm glad Myron changed to the 2 AWG. I hope he also has a minimum 8 AWG to the frame on the inverter chassis ground lug as outlined by Xantrex.
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Old 10-14-2016, 12:48 PM   #34
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I replaced the original thin wire that connected the 2 6v batteries with a cable made to connect a car battery to the starter. I thought I might have to use the batteries to jump start my suv at a remote campsite and was concerned about the amperage draw through the smallest wire in the system. Precautionary since I don't know if jump starting would have been a problem.
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Old 10-14-2016, 04:12 PM   #35
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Man, I do love any opportunity for picture/illustration.
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Old 10-14-2016, 06:28 PM   #36
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Hello
This makes good sense. Wondering if marine grade ( tinned copper and more strands for flexibility ) is ever considered.
We`re looking to buy a 17' trailer and our background is sailing on a 35 ' Niagara

cheers
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Old 10-14-2016, 07:38 PM   #37
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Bought some super flexible 1/0 gauge from a car stereo supplier to hook up an large inverter and for between the batteries. Even at 5250 strand, which was the highest count I could find, I could not bend it enough to close the cover on the under bench battery box. Ended up using smaller 2 gauge welder cable, still very flexible but at a fraction of the price when bought at a local welders supply.

Don't know how valid it is, but I read somewhere you can double up on smaller gauge cables to achieve a higher rating.
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Old 10-14-2016, 09:01 PM   #38
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It's also really a question of the tipping point between availability and how much you're willing to spend. AWG2 wire is ornery and stiff and costs .98 a foot at HomeDepot.
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Old 10-14-2016, 11:05 PM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeA View Post
Hello
This makes good sense. Wondering if marine grade ( tinned copper and more strands for flexibility ) is ever considered.
Nothing wrong with using deluxe wire if your credit card can take the strain. The tinning adds an extra barrier to salt water corrosion and extra flex makes for easier handling. But it doesn't have any electrical advantage over cheap wire. So if your wire is inside and protected then you might consider welding wire for flexibility and save some $$$.

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Old 10-14-2016, 11:14 PM   #40
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High conductor count cable can really carry a lot of current with minimal loss. The cables I ran between the batteries (4 total) in the front and rear of my 19 were 1/0 AWG welding cables with 998 30 gauge conductors; large but very flexible. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B019O1M9TK...0750_194349580
Reace ran two 3 AWG wires for the 2500 watt inverter I installed later. Those were low conductor count and pretty stiff. That cable size was called for in my inverter installation manal for that cable length.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeA View Post
Hello
This makes good sense. Wondering if marine grade ( tinned copper and more strands for flexibility ) is ever considered.
We`re looking to buy a 17' trailer and our background is sailing on a 35 ' Niagara

cheers
George
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