Chilliwack, Osoyoos, & Where Advice - Page 2 - Escape Trailer Owners Community

Go Back   Escape Trailer Owners Community > Camping | Places, Gear and Planning > Trips and Travel Planning
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 04-28-2015, 09:13 AM   #11
Senior Member
 
Dave Walter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Trailer: 2013 Escape 19 & 15B
Posts: 1,869
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drumstick63 View Post
...We feel better about potential weather conditions but are still a little concerned about road conditions. "No gravel" is good to hear but what about "frost heaves" and other things that might cause damage (fridge doors, stove door, cabinet doors, etc.) to the trailer? Yes, we are probably being too paranoid with the "new" 5.0TA!...
Although it is a paved road and is travelled by thousands of RV's of all sizes every summer, the Columbia Icefield Parkway can be a bit rough in places due to seasonal freezing/thawing. We have towed our 19' on this road several times with absolutely no issues. Just slow down a bit if it gets a little rough in places and you should be fine. Slightly reduced speed will also make it so much easier to view the wonderful scenery along this roadway.
__________________

__________________
2013-19' & 2013-15B {avg is two 17's}, towed by 2011 Toyota FJ Cruiser

"It is better to remain silent at the risk of being thought a fool, than to talk and remove all doubt of it." - 1907, Maurice Switzer
Dave Walter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2015, 12:40 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Trailer: 1979 Boler B1700
Posts: 9,036
Quote:
Originally Posted by ice-breaker View Post
Although it is a paved road and is travelled by thousands of RV's of all sizes every summer, the Columbia Icefield Parkway can be a bit rough in places due to seasonal freezing/thawing.
I agree - I drove the south half of the Icefields Parkway earlier this month (just in a van - no RV) and found it rougher than more major routes such as the Yellowhead, but not so bad that I would hesitate to take an RV (motorhome or trailer) on it.

Fortunately, Reace incorporated an equalizer with a rubber dampener (Dexter E-Z Flex) in the 5.0TA suspension, so it should handle the bumps with less shock to the trailer and contents than a basic leaf-spring suspension with a rigid equalizer.
__________________

Brian B-P is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2015, 12:53 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Delta, British Columbia
Trailer: 2015 5.0TA
Posts: 272
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Bennett View Post
What Doug said!

Definitely take Highway 5 up to Jasper, glorious route. Wells Grey Provincial Park is along the way, and is one of my favourite areas to explore. Nowhere near the crowds in that Banff or Jasper has, lots of waterfalls, great hikes, and lots of canoeing if desired.

I prefer spending time around Jasper to Banff. Again, less people, and is kinda like Banff was 40 years ago. Don't get me wrong though, Banff National Park has many, many outstanding things to see.

The Icefields Parkway is one of the most beautiful drives in the world, no exaggeration. I have driven it a few dozen times, and am still in awe every time I drive it again.
Not to mention, you drive right by Mount Robson, its a special sight. The campground in Mount Robson Provincial Park is just off the highway and is huge so finding a site is likely. If you are lucky you will get a view of the peak.

Mark
GerriJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2015, 06:48 PM   #14
Member
 
Dave&Jane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Logan, Utah
Trailer: Escape 17B (2014)
Posts: 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian B-P View Post

The big problem comes when the slabs settle unevenly, sometimes looking like a sawtooth (climb up the sloped slab, fall down on to the next, and repeat ad nauseum). Even if they stay level and nicely lined up, if the asphalt layer isn't added there are still those joints.
The freeways in our state have been modified to prevent this problem with a "Dowel Bar Retrofit" process. Slots are cut across slab joints and steel dowel bars are placed in the slots to hold the slabs in place. As you drive it's easy to see the repeating pattern of parallel slots in the pavement. (So far, it seems to be working).

-Dave
__________________
Dave and Jane
Logan, Utah
Dave&Jane is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2015, 07:18 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
rbryan4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Trailer: 2015 19 "Past Tents", 2015 F150 Ecoboost
Posts: 7,569
Saw those in a few places in Utah Dave. Doesn't solve the main problem though -- grossly overweight and unsafe trucks damaging the roads. I know they pay more in road taxes, but the problem is that in most states the politicians find ways to spend the money elsewhere.
__________________
"You can't buy happiness, but you can buy an RV. And that is pretty close."
rbryan4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2015, 07:34 PM   #16
Member
 
alan in alberta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: St Albert, Alberta
Trailer: 2006 Escape 17B
Posts: 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by GerriJ View Post
Not to mention, you drive right by Mount Robson, its a special sight. The campground in Mount Robson Provincial Park is just off the highway and is huge so finding a site is likely. If you are lucky you will get a view of the peak.

Mark
Here is a shot of part of Mount Robson from a few weeks ago
Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG_20150315_173055.jpg (375.4 KB, 21 views)
alan in alberta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2015, 08:01 PM   #17
Member
 
Dave&Jane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Logan, Utah
Trailer: Escape 17B (2014)
Posts: 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbryan4 View Post
Saw those in a few places in Utah Dave. Doesn't solve the main problem though -- grossly overweight and unsafe trucks damaging the roads. I know they pay more in road taxes, but the problem is that in most states the politicians find ways to spend the money elsewhere.
This has annoyed me for a long time. The long-distance trucking industry is subsidized by everyone else. "Freight trucks cause 99% of wear-and-tear on US roads, but only pay for 35% of the maintenance." One one fully loaded 18-wheeler does the same damage to a road as 9600 cars.

(Oops - now we're really off topic).

-Dave
__________________
Dave and Jane
Logan, Utah
Dave&Jane is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2015, 08:47 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
gbaglo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: North Vancouver, British Columbia
Trailer: 2009 Escape 17B - "Toad". '08 Toyota RAV4 V6
Posts: 10,715
Those trucks also deliver all those products, including food, that you buy. Truckers barely make a living as it is. Tax them and you will end up paying double for your California vegetable plate.
__________________
2009 Escape 17B "Toad"
2008 Toyota RAV4 V6 Sport
North Vancouver, British Columbia

What happens to the hole when the cheese is gone?
- Bertolt Brecht
gbaglo is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2015, 08:57 PM   #19
Site Team
 
Donna D.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Portland, Oregon
Trailer: 2014 Escape 5.0 TA
Posts: 6,821
I work for a worldwide transportation company. In 2014, we spent (in the US) $498,604,000.00 in fuel and fuel taxes. It's up to your government and local politicans to figure out how to best use the money for roads. I can find a like number of blogs that say it's studs on passenger car snow tires that tear up the roads, etc.
__________________
Donna D.
Ten Forward
2014 Escape 5.0TA
Donna D. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2015, 10:25 PM   #20
Member
 
Dave&Jane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Logan, Utah
Trailer: Escape 17B (2014)
Posts: 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Donna D. View Post
I can find a like number of blogs that say it's studs on passenger car snow tires that tear up the roads, etc.
You are right, Donna. Bloggers can exaggerate and promote unsubstantiated opinions, and this likely is true for that one I quoted. I have more confidence in appropriate governmental agencies, like the Federal Highway Administration: "The U.S. Department of Transportation in its most recent Highway Cost Allocation Study estimated that light single-unit trucks, operating at less than 25,000 pounds, pay 150 percent of their road costs while the heaviest tractor-trailer combination trucks, weighing over 100,000 pounds, pay only 50 percent of their road costs."

Quote:
Originally Posted by gbaglo View Post
Those trucks also deliver all those products, including food, that you buy. Truckers barely make a living as it is. Tax them and you will end up paying double for your California vegetable plate.
I would not be opposed to paying more if the cost is valid, although realistically a level economic playing field is not possible in our world. Regardless, I think we should pay truck drivers more so they can make a living while driving fewer hours with lighter loads at slower speeds.

-Dave
__________________

__________________
Dave and Jane
Logan, Utah
Dave&Jane is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off






» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:43 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2012 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.