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Old 04-25-2016, 01:44 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by GregandTeresa View Post
All right, now you're talking. Handguns or long guns?
But no grenades, an inactive one closed down the Sumas border crossing for a few hours last week. Doesn't every family go travelling across international borders with a grenade

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Old 04-25-2016, 01:51 PM   #32
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Climate change is science. Tow vehicle alternatives are relevant to towing travel trailers. Carbon credits and carbon-based taxation schemes are not science, and seem to me to be politics rather than particularly relevant to travel trailers.

At the very least, this appears to be a subject to discuss around the Cyber Campfire (or a real one), as it is not about Escape even in General.

Camels
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Originally Posted by Vermilye View Post
Well they were in Quartzsite, AZ in the 1850's.
After that, they went to California and then the Cariboo region of British Columbia for the gold rushes. A major centre of the Cariboo gold rush was Barkerville, which still exists as a historic attraction and good stop for people exploring interior B.C. with RVs... but it doesn't have any camels any more.
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Old 04-25-2016, 01:57 PM   #33
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From Wiki:

Around 3–5 million years ago, the North American Camelidae spread to South America via the Isthmus of Panama, where they gave rise to guanacos and related animals, and to Asia via the Bering land bridge.[13][50][51] Surprising finds of fossil Paracamelus on Ellesmere Island beginning in 2006 in the high Canadian Arctic indicate the dromedary is descended from a larger, boreal browser whose hump may have evolved as an adaptation in a cold climate.[56][57] This creature is estimated to have stood around nine feet tall.[58] The last camel native to North America was Camelops hesternus, which vanished along with horses, short-faced bears, mammoths and mastodons, ground sloths, sabertooth cats, and many other megafauna, coinciding with the migration of humans from Asia.[59][60]
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Old 04-25-2016, 02:31 PM   #34
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Well they were in Quartzsite, AZ in the 1850's. An experiment that didn't work, but the Hi Jolly Monument is an interesting visit when looking for things to do during a long winter in the desert.
And a great song from the New Christy Minstrels came from that story:

HI JOLLY, THE CAMEL DRIVER - Lyrics - International Lyrics Playground
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Old 04-25-2016, 03:30 PM   #35
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We are not going to turn this thread in to a political stage. Okay?
Ok. Now, kill the thread. You're empowered.
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Old 04-25-2016, 03:59 PM   #36
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Originally Posted by gbaglo View Post
From Wiki:

Around 3–5 million years ago, the North American Camelidae spread to South America via the Isthmus of Panama, where they gave rise to guanacos and related animals, and to Asia via the Bering land bridge....
I had read that long ago, but forgotten about it. Horses have a similar story (again from Wikipedia):
Quote:
The genus Equus, which includes all extant equines, is believed to have evolved from Dinohippus, via the intermediate form Plesippus. One of the oldest species is Equus simplicidens, described as zebra-like with a donkey-shaped head. The oldest fossil to date is ~3.5 million years old from Idaho, USA. The genus appears to have spread quickly into the Old World...
Quote:
Digs in western Canada have unearthed clear evidence horses existed in North America until about 12,000 years ago. However, all Equidae in North America ultimately became extinct...
So there was a lot of stuff here that didn't make it to modern times... so we had to bring them back from other parts of the world.
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Old 04-25-2016, 04:16 PM   #37
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Remember a couple of things:
Let it Go
Walk On By


No member needs to read every single post or feel compelled to reply to every single post. Sometimes the best action is to step away from the keyboard...


Ok I'm gonna say this is the best post I've seen in weeks. I'll take it to heart.
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Old 04-25-2016, 08:43 PM   #38
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Originally Posted by gbaglo View Post
From Wiki:

Around 35 million years ago, the North American Camelidae spread to South America via the Isthmus of Panama, where they gave rise to guanacos and related animals, and to Asia via the Bering land bridge.[13][50][51] Surprising finds of fossil Paracamelus on Ellesmere Island beginning in 2006 in the high Canadian Arctic indicate the dromedary is descended from a larger, boreal browser whose hump may have evolved as an adaptation in a cold climate.[56][57] This creature is estimated to have stood around nine feet tall.[58] The last camel native to North America was Camelops hesternus, which vanished along with horses, short-faced bears, mammoths and mastodons, ground sloths, sabertooth cats, and many other megafauna, coinciding with the migration of humans from Asia.[59][60]
Tell us the story of the Camel filter.
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Old 04-25-2016, 08:49 PM   #39
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Tell us the story of the Camel filter.
Joe Cool!
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File Type: jpg joe-camel.jpg (48.2 KB, 76 views)
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Old 04-25-2016, 08:53 PM   #40
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My dad used to send me up to the corner store for unfiltered Camels every day. I still like the smell of someone lighting one.
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