CO detector - Escape Trailer Owners Community

Go Back   Escape Trailer Owners Community > Escape Me | General Topics > General Escape
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-03-2016, 01:50 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
gbaglo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: North Vancouver, British Columbia
Trailer: 2009 Escape 17B - "Toad". '08 Toyota RAV4 V6
Posts: 9,227
CO detector

Considering a portable carbon monoxide detector that's on sale at Canadian Tire. But, wondering if there is much point in having one. What source for CO would there be in the trailer? The furnace combustion takes place outside, as does the water heater. I suppose that the fridge could produce CO but it would have to find its way into the interior of the trailer.
Have the propane gas detector and smoke detector.
__________________

__________________
2009 Escape 17B "Toad"
2008 Toyota RAV4 V6 Sport
North Vancouver, British Columbia

What happens to the hole when the cheese is gone?
- Bertolt Brecht
gbaglo is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2016, 03:01 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
rbryan4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Trailer: 2015 19 "Past Tents", 2015 F150 Ecoboost
Posts: 5,794
I've always questioned that too Glenn. It makes sense in a Motorhome perhaps, since a carbon monoxide leak or build up from the engine could potentially enter the living area. But in a tow behind? I see no need.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
__________________

__________________
"You can't buy happiness, but you can buy an RV. And that is pretty close."
rbryan4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2016, 03:14 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: North Van., British Columbia
Trailer: 2014 Escape 19
Posts: 2,412
[QUOTE=gbaglo;162787
The furnace combustion takes place outside, [/QUOTE]

The furnace can make CO if it's not burning cleanly. For the CO to be exhausted to the exterior the heat exchanger must be in perfect condition. Any perforations will allow the CO to leak into the air being heated and then blown into the interior.

This is probably the greatest source of CO related incidents relating to home furnaces and the major reason CO detectors are encouraged/required.

Ron
Ron in BC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2016, 03:18 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
rbryan4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Trailer: 2015 19 "Past Tents", 2015 F150 Ecoboost
Posts: 5,794
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron in BC View Post
The furnace can make CO if it's not burning cleanly. For the CO to be exhausted to the exterior the heat exchanger must be in perfect condition. Any perforations will allow the CO to leak into the air being heated and then blown into the interior.

This is probably the greatest source of CO related incidents relating to home furnaces and the major reason CO detectors are encouraged/required.

Ron
Ah, that makes sense. Partial combustion could mean CO potentially leaking to the interior. Thanks for the info.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
__________________
"You can't buy happiness, but you can buy an RV. And that is pretty close."
rbryan4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2016, 03:31 PM   #5
Member
 
Dave&Jane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Logan, Utah
Trailer: Escape 17B (2014)
Posts: 81
A CO detector is cheap insurance, given the potentially deadly consequences of CO poisoning.

The most likely CO source probably would be a defect in the furnace heat exchanger, allowing combustion gas to enter the trailer. Other potential CO sources are the gas stovetop (incomplete combustion creates CO) or exhaust from a vehicle, hot water heater or fridge that enters through a vent or window.

FYI, I experienced CO poisoning from a defective furnace in our college apartment, and it's nothing to take lightly. Unfortunately the symptoms (headache and nausea) mimic the flu, so people often do not realize what is going on. Now, I maintain CO alarms in my home and in my trailer.

- Dave
__________________
Dave and Jane
Logan, Utah
Dave&Jane is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2016, 03:36 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Front Range, Colorado
Trailer: Eureka Equinox 6 person tent. (with a broken zipper) 5.0 TA on order July 2017 delivery
Posts: 250
Since CO is a byproduct of all fire it is possible that a CO detector can alert before a smoke detector if there is a smoldering fire in the upholstery. I am also planning to investigate a catalytic propane heater for winter camping and if I had one of those I would put an additional CO detector in the sleeping loft of the 5.0 TA.
SFDavis50 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2016, 03:38 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: New Westminster, British Columbia
Trailer: 2009 Escape 17B
Posts: 125
After the stove the furnace is the biggest risk in the trailer as it has the largest heat output. It also would run most frequently during the night which is also the highest risk time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gbaglo View Post
The furnace combustion takes place outside
I pulled up the install manual for the furnace in my trailer and the heat exchanger is between the blower and the interior of the trailer.

The biggest risk would be from a cracked furnace heat exchanger. This would allow products of combustion to enter into the blower and into the living area while it is operating.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gbaglo View Post
as does the water heater
The heat exchanger for the hot water heater is a tube immersed in the water tank that has a burner tube on the outside end - install manual on page 10. It looks like the hot gases travel into the tube on the bottom and exhaust out on the top. The hot water tank is usually pressurized so if this heat exchanger cracked than water would likely start running out and either extinguish the flame or give you a warning sign of failure.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gbaglo View Post
I suppose that the fridge could produce CO
The propane cooling system on your fridge is indirect. The flame heats a solution of ammonia that starts a reaction in a set of sealed tubes - found this article that describes the process. This should keep the flame and combustion gases on the outside of the trailer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gbaglo View Post
wondering if there is much point in having one
Better to be safe and have a detector. CO is a silent killer because you can't smell it and it just puts you to sleep. My family lost 4 people due to a faulty propane heater while they were sleeping in a cabin back in the 70's.

You can get combo smoke detector and CO alarm to replace the existing detector in your trailer. Smoke detectors need to be replaced every 10 years.
msweet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2016, 03:43 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: New Westminster, British Columbia
Trailer: 2009 Escape 17B
Posts: 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbryan4 View Post
Partial combustion could mean CO potentially leaking to the interior.
Furnace combustion normally takes place inside a sealed heat exchanger. Poor or partial combustion would only increase the risk of CO poisoning if the heat exchanger was cracked or if the exhaust gases were being drawn back into the trailer through another opening.
msweet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2016, 03:47 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: New Westminster, British Columbia
Trailer: 2009 Escape 17B
Posts: 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave&Jane View Post
A CO detector is cheap insurance, given the potentially deadly consequences of CO poisoning.
Agreed!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave&Jane View Post
FYI, I experienced CO poisoning from a defective furnace in our college apartment, and it's nothing to take lightly. Unfortunately the symptoms (headache and nausea) mimic the flu, so people often do not realize what is going on. Now, I maintain CO alarms in my home and in my trailer.
We had a squirrel climb down our hot water tank flue - we think it smelled the bird seed (stored in the mechanical room) in the flue gases. It died right at the hot water tank flue connection and slowly bloated over the next few days. This sealed off the hot water tank flue and allowed combustion gases to pour directly into our house. I noticed the smell of the combustion gases before the CO detectors went off so I replaced them immediately.
msweet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2016, 04:09 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
gbaglo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: North Vancouver, British Columbia
Trailer: 2009 Escape 17B - "Toad". '08 Toyota RAV4 V6
Posts: 9,227
Well, I bought it. Was only $26 and included two AAs.
I question those combo smoke and CO detectors since the CO detector is supposed to be about 3' off the floor and the smoke detector is supposed to be near the ceiling.
__________________

__________________
2009 Escape 17B "Toad"
2008 Toyota RAV4 V6 Sport
North Vancouver, British Columbia

What happens to the hole when the cheese is gone?
- Bertolt Brecht
gbaglo is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off






» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:08 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2012 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.