Driving Coast to Coast for Pickup - Page 3 - Escape Trailer Owners Community

Go Back   Escape Trailer Owners Community > Escape Me | General Topics > General Escape
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-21-2013, 01:37 AM   #21
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Nanoose Bay, British Columbia
Trailer: 2014 5.0 TA
Posts: 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by bvansnell View Post
I have lived in Vancouver BC, Winnipeg Manitoba, Toronto, Kingston and London Ontario and Montreal Quebec and have driven both east to west and west to east many times as a result. I have driven both through the US and through Canada. Some considerations:
  1. What time of year are you planning to make the trip?
  2. Will you be travelling alone or with a co-driver? Will there be children?
  3. How young are you? If you are older you might not want to drive as far each day.
Some general advice:
  1. The route north from Sault Ste. Marie over Lake Superior and west on the Trans Canada Highway is a long, lonely route. A much faster and safer route is to take US#2 through Escanaba, Duluth, Minot.
  2. From Minot you can either continue west on US#2 or head north on US#52 and join the Trans Canada Highway near Moose Jaw
  3. The price of gas is significantly higher in Canada than in the US. In Vancouver BC is is presently $1.26 per litre, equivalent to about US$4.54 per US gallon. We bought gas about a week ago just south of us in Washington state for US$3.02 per US gallon.
  4. When we were traveling with a family we generally did not go more than 500 miles per day. If you are young and have a co-driver you can go much further. I have driven non-stop from London, Ontario to Vancouver BC on the mixed US/Canadian route described in 1. and 2. above
  5. The route from Calgary west on the Trans Canada highway is scenic assuming good weather. The Rockies are spectacular. From Kamloops south the Coquihalla Highway #5 is faster although Highway #1 (Fraser Canyon) is beautiful.
padlin, I think Brian's description is right on. But you may want to consider the following changes. Have your partner fly to Regina. As you drive to Calgary, one can take in Drumheller (just an hour north of the Trans-Canada) before one reaches Calgary. This is dinosaur country c/w the Tyrrell Museum (Google it) and if one is of the religious persuasion, Drumheller presents a world class outdoor passion play. Then back to the Trans-Canada, through Calgary and on to Chilliwack.

Although Brian is right that the Coquihalla Highway #5 is faster, Highway #1 through the Fraser Canyon is not only more beautiful, but offers much more interesting stuff. Lots of tunnels, real cool campgrounds (too bad you won't have your trailer), rapids & quaint towns. In my view, if you are going through once, this is the way to go.

After picking up the trailer and in Washington State, you may want to head east through Grand Coulee Dam, then across Idaho into Montana. You mentioned Custer State Park... good stuff... but you may not want to miss the Lewis & Clark Caverns (Montana)... we really enjoyed them.

Hope to hit Maine some time next summer in our new "Big Easy"!!!

Enjoy & Travel Safe
Larry
__________________

Stargeezer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2013, 02:50 AM   #22
Senior Member
 
padlin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Southwick, Massachusetts
Trailer: 5.0 TA #6, 2012 F150 EB
Posts: 3,817
Sounds like I'll need a 2nd trip, Yeehaa.
__________________

padlin is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2013, 08:25 AM   #23
Senior Member
 
Ruthe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Highland Park, New Jersey
Trailer: Escape 19 February 2014
Posts: 843
I also endorse Theodore Roosevelt National Park. I'm glad to hear it is still uncrowded --
Ruthe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2013, 10:22 AM   #24
Senior Member
 
azjack's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Tucson, AZ, Arizona
Trailer: gone, 19 and 21
Posts: 472
Quote:
Originally Posted by gabeck View Post
We did notice that in N.Dakota motels close to the hwy seemed very busy ... rv park we stayed at in Minot N. Dakota had lots of long term oil field workers , lots of winterized trailers.
Could not even imagine spending the winter that way . Oil pumps everywhere . There is a lot of truck traffic , but the hwys are very good ,easy drive .
Minot is interesting, in 1963/65 we spent two winters there while on our honeymoon. We lived in a 1954 schult that was 37 by 8 really large by our standard today and I could walk all around it as the snow drifts went to the top but melted about 3 feet of the snow away from the trailer, I guess no one insulated like Rease does now. I guess if we could put up with that, then the next 48 years wouldn't be too tough. We just can't seem to give up the trailer life completely.
Jack and Nancy of Tucson
azjack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2013, 10:53 AM   #25
Senior Member
 
gabeck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Trailer: 2012 Escape 15 A
Posts: 1,212
Quote:
Originally Posted by azjack View Post
Minot is interesting, in 1963/65 we spent two winters there while on our honeymoon. We lived in a 1954 schult that was 37 by 8 really large by our standard today and I could walk all around it as the snow drifts went to the top but melted about 3 feet of the snow away from the trailer, I guess no one insulated like Rease does now. I guess if we could put up with that, then the next 48 years wouldn't be too tough. We just can't seem to give up the trailer life completely.
Jack and Nancy of Tucson
Guess that might be a case of " timing on life's journey " , we too have lived through some cold winters in remote places ( not that Minot is remote ) , in northern Ontario , as well just plain cold places like Thompson + Winnipeg Manitoba . For those hunkering down in Minot I could only think BRRRR… those prairie winds …...
__________________
All things in life are easier to swallow with a good cup of tea .....
gabeck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2013, 06:48 PM   #26
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Trailer: 1979 Boler B1700
Posts: 9,036
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stargeezer View Post
Although Brian is right that the Coquihalla Highway #5 is faster, Highway #1 through the Fraser Canyon is not only more beautiful, but offers much more interesting stuff. Lots of tunnels, real cool campgrounds (too bad you won't have your trailer), rapids & quaint towns. In my view, if you are going through once, this is the way to go.
Good points. I had not driven this section of the Trans-Canada Highway (Kamloops-Hope) for many years - since the Coquihalla opened - and recently drove it to avoid the chance of snow up on the "Coq". It is longer in distance and likely (depending on climbing speed on the long Coquihalla grades, but that's not an issue without an RV) even longer in time... but we're talking about an hour or two.

For comparison, Highway 1 (Trans-Canada) in this section is two-lane with some passing lanes (generally on uphill sections), while the Highway 5 (Coquihalla) is all divided, with at least two lanes each way everywhere and long stretches of three lanes on uphill grades to keep the slow trucks from being a hindrance. Hwy 1 follows the Fraser river generally along the bottom of the valley, while Hwy 5 goes through high passes. Hwy 1 has old two-lane tunnels bored through mountains, while Hwy 5 has shorter snowshed-style tunnels.
Brian B-P is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2013, 06:52 PM   #27
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Trailer: 1979 Boler B1700
Posts: 9,036
Quote:
Originally Posted by bvansnell View Post
The price of gas is significantly higher in Canada than in the US. In Vancouver BC is is presently $1.26 per litre, equivalent to about US$4.54 per US gallon. We bought gas about a week ago just south of us in Washington state for US$3.02 per US gallon.
Although gas in Canada is certainly more expensive on average than in the U.S., Vancouver is a relatively extreme example, as the most expensive major city in the country. If the cost of fuel is a significant concern, a U.S. route is preferable - and avoiding Northern Ontario has a double advantage of time savings and avoiding fuel prices which can be as high as Vancouver.

Come to Alberta - our gas is relatively cheap.
Brian B-P is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2013, 07:22 PM   #28
Senior Member
 
padlin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Southwick, Massachusetts
Trailer: 5.0 TA #6, 2012 F150 EB
Posts: 3,817
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian B-P View Post
Come to Alberta - our gas is relatively cheap.
Going to take you up on the offer, figure to spend a few days in the Banff/Jasper area, just in case I don't make it back. Never know...

Think I'd need hotel/campground reservations in early Aug? I'm guessing yes.
padlin is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2013, 07:36 PM   #29
Senior Member
 
JohnB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia
Trailer: 2012 15A
Posts: 395
Quote:
Originally Posted by padlin View Post
Going to take you up on the offer, figure to spend a few days in the Banff/Jasper area, just in case I don't make it back. Never know...

Think I'd need hotel/campground reservations in early Aug? I'm guessing yes.
You would definitely want a reservation at one of the two national park camp sites in Jasper. The one camp site is really large, Whistlers, about 800 sites, but it is a popular place and you don't want to be disappointed. The other site is Wapiti, about 360 sites, just down the road a kilometer or so but closer to the Athabaska River. There are a couple of smaller camp grounds to the east.

I have never camped in Banff so not familiar with camp grounds there. Once again, reservations are likely critical.
JohnB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2013, 08:05 PM   #30
Site Team
 
cpaharley2008's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: York, Pennsylvania
Trailer: 2016 2ndGen Escape 19' PRAIRIE SCHOONER pulled by 2014 Ram Hemi/8sp
Posts: 13,654
Quote:
Originally Posted by padlin View Post
Going to take you up on the offer, figure to spend a few days in the Banff/Jasper area, just in case I don't make it back. Never know...

Think I'd need hotel/campground reservations in early Aug? I'm guessing yes.
Something that far in advance may be hard to plan. With your new Escape you may find waiting until 24-48 hours, that way you are not locked into a place. Sometimes I like to stay longer at a campsite longer and hate to have to leave because of a reservation at another location. Any KOA will not turn you away, they always have a tent or overflow site you can squeeze into.
__________________

__________________
Jim
The two most important days in your life are the day you were born and the day you find out why………..Mark Twain
cpaharley2008 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off






» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:07 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2012 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.