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Old 01-21-2014, 05:34 PM   #151
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Originally Posted by santacruzer View Post
Myron,

It appears your chains are attached to separate loops at each end of the bar, and not on the bar itself, so they wouldn't slide.
Good catch - judging from the angle of the first link, it must be welded to the trailer frame and/or the bar, not just free on the bar. That makes the bar a brace for two separate chain mounting points, rather than a single long mounting point... although if one side tore off, I wonder if the other side would be unaffected.

I assume from earlier discussion that other Escapes do not have these welded-in-place first links, but if they don't, they could be easily modified to this configuration.
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Old 01-22-2014, 12:05 AM   #152
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Bob - When you come over (after we pick up our trailer), you can give us a tutorial on all the ins and outs of the chains ;-)
Jan
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Old 01-22-2014, 11:56 AM   #153
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Bob - When you come over (after we pick up our trailer), you can give us a tutorial on all the ins and outs of the chains ;-)
Jan
Happy to, after we've made the appropriate congratulatory toast!

This thread has already been a pretty good tutorial for me, a few things bubbled up that caused me look closer at matters myself.
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Old 01-22-2014, 12:02 PM   #154
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Clever... but if those chains ever need to do their job, won't the hose will pop off instantly and the chains slide to the middle of the bar, which will likely bend forward in the middle, and there will be too much chain slack? We're talking about potentially high forces here.
Welding the links in place would be the better solution, although a stopgap measure would be to secure the split hose with two or three stainless hose clamps.
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Old 01-22-2014, 12:39 PM   #155
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Originally Posted by santacruzer View Post
Myron,

It appears your chains are attached to separate loops at each end of the bar, and not on the bar itself, so they wouldn't slide.

Also, I've been looking further into the weight rating of QuickLinks. A 1/4" Reese brand QuickLink is rated at 3500 pounds, while the 5/16" Reese brand is at 5000 pounds. I have 1/4" chains on my 17B, so if Escape gave me the Reese brand it would pass muster in California after all. I would imagine you got 5/16" chains for your 19.
Stamped on 5/16" Reese Quicklinks is SWL 1760lbs. Confused me with the 2 numbers, but found this on Wiki:

" Safe Working Load (SWL) sometimes stated as the Normal Working Load (NWL) is the load that a piece of Lifting Equipment, lifting device or accessory can safely lift, suspend, or lower without fear of breaking. Usually marked on the equipment by the manufacturer and is often 1/5 of the Minimum Breaking Strength (MBS) although other fractions may be used such as 1/4, 1/6 and 1/10"

So the 5000# must be the MBS rating?
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Old 01-22-2014, 03:39 PM   #156
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Stamped on 5/16" Reese Quicklinks is SWL 1760lbs. Confused me with the 2 numbers, but found this on Wiki:

" Safe Working Load (SWL) sometimes stated as the Normal Working Load (NWL) is the load that a piece of Lifting Equipment, lifting device or accessory can safely lift, suspend, or lower without fear of breaking. Usually marked on the equipment by the manufacturer and is often 1/5 of the Minimum Breaking Strength (MBS) although other fractions may be used such as 1/4, 1/6 and 1/10"

So the 5000# must be the MBS rating?
The Reese web page for one 5/16 QuickLink (74602) just says 5000 lbs, doesn't differentiate between SWL and MBS. I guess the difference is the operating margin of safety...pretty high.
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Old 01-22-2014, 04:14 PM   #157
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Old 01-22-2014, 05:42 PM   #158
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The Reese web page for one 5/16 QuickLink (74602) just says 5000 lbs, doesn't differentiate between SWL and MBS. I guess the difference is the operating margin of safety...pretty high.
Sure seems to be. I suppose there are some applications where they have to go by that much lower weight limit rating- sound like it is specifically when lifting or suspending something. Makes a lot of sense to have a huge safety margin in those situations. At least now I know for sure that the ones that came on my trailer are plenty strong.
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Old 01-22-2014, 08:43 PM   #159
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I suppose there are some applications where they have to go by that much lower weight limit rating- sound like it is specifically when lifting or suspending something. Makes a lot of sense to have a huge safety margin in those situations. At least now I know for sure that the ones that came on my trailer are plenty strong.
It's not just a safety margin.

If you suspend something, it can bounce up and down. If the suspension hardware has a breaking strength just slightly higher than the weight of the object, it will break, because it will be subjected to higher forces. Say, for instance, that you hook up your hardware to the object on the ground, then lift: if you accelerate the object at all - and you must, because you need it to move and it starts stationary - then you will be applying a force equal to the weight plus the force required to accelerate it. This is why a "live" (moving) load is very different from a static (unchanging) load... even without allowing a "safety margin" to allow for errors in calculation or flaws in construction.

I don't think anyone intends to hang their trailer in the air by one safety chain, so it would not make sense to to me to require the safety chain hardware to have a working load limit equal to the weight of the trailer. Instead, it would make sense to required the hardware to have a breaking strength of at least the trailer weight.
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Old 01-22-2014, 09:21 PM   #160
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Just guessing, but I think most manufactures would be more likely to publish the safe working load of a device used for general public use rather than it's ultimate strength. This based on the general observation that most people like to stretch anything as far as they can to get maximum value from it.

As noted in other posts above, items that are used where life may be at risk such as lifting devices, ropes or slings a higher factor of safety is typically applied to the ultimate capacity.

If a manufacturer were to only list the ultimate strength on the packaging they would be in court most of the time defending against the improper use of their devices when the device failed due to improper usage.

Some commercial products are packaged with both the safe working load and the ultimate strength published. I would much rather purchase a product labeled like that rather than one that only publishes a load without publishing any load factors applied or ultimate strength. Otherwise how are you to know?

Ex.: A wire sling used to lift workers may have a load factor of 6 or more applied to determine the safe working load. If the user knew the load factor they could safely support a higher load for an application not involving lifting workers as long as they did not go down to a load factor approaching one. You have to know what load is published and how you intend to use the product.
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