DIY Solar Installation Question - Page 3 - Escape Trailer Owners Community

Go Back   Escape Trailer Owners Community > Escape Tech > Modifications and Alterations
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-24-2013, 09:02 AM   #21
Senior Member
 
thoer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Galesville, Wisconsin
Trailer: 2017 21 "Blue II" & 2017 Highlander XLE (previously 2010 17B "Blue" & 2008 Tacoma)
Posts: 3,955
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Bennett View Post
Yep, any 19 without a storage box, and even a couple that do, have the batteries under the dinette seat, like mine....
Ahh - thanks Jim. I forgot that not all the Escapes have batteries easily accessible on the rear bumper like the 17Bs do.
__________________

__________________
Eric (and Mary who is in no way responsible for anything stupid I post)

SAE Towing Standard "Beware of false knowledge; it is more dangerous than ignorance." George Bernard Shaw
thoer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2013, 09:39 AM   #22
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Strongsville, Ohio
Trailer: 2013 Escape 19
Posts: 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Bennett View Post
Yep, any 19 without a storage box, and even a couple that do, have the batteries under the dinette seat, like mine.

I chatted via email with the sales manager for CEA because I was interested. They will ship to Canada for anyone interested, though will only do UPS, as they claim the package is to big to ship USPS. He was quite helpful though.

HERE is a link to the user manual.

He also sent me a PDF of the 10 Amp PWM Charge Controller they use, but it is a bit too big to upload. I could email it if anyone is interested.
About the 19 battery location: We recently ordered a 2013 19 and last week I checked with Tammy on the battery location as I'm thinking this solar portable vs installed thing over.
She said "The batteries are mounted either inside the storage box or just behind the propane tanks in front of the trailer if you do not have the storage box."

This is what I was hoping for, because I think it makes the use of a portable system less complicated...that is I don't have to worry about drilling holes in the trailer to get under the seat!
__________________

SeldomSeen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2013, 11:57 AM   #23
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Escondido, California
Trailer: 2012 Escape 19'
Posts: 874
Quote:
Originally Posted by SeldomSeen View Post
About the 19 battery location: We recently ordered a 2013 19 and last week I checked with Tammy on the battery location as I'm thinking this solar portable vs installed thing over.
She said "The batteries are mounted either inside the storage box or just behind the propane tanks in front of the trailer if you do not have the storage box."

This is what I was hoping for, because I think it makes the use of a portable system less complicated...that is I don't have to worry about drilling holes in the trailer to get under the seat!
I don't really understand the practical advantage of portable solar panels used for a 19' Escape trailer. We have a 19' and are glad the solar panel is mounted on the roof. It is in a great location on top of the trailer and puts out a lot of charge power. We often leave the trailer site when we set up and wouldn't want to worry about someone taking it when we are gone. We also don't want to haul something large, fragile and expensive around while camping. I also like the batteries up front in my storage box. In fact I added two more batteries there and now have 460 amps at 12 volts of battery storage. There is still all the room I need in the box for my power cords, hoses, wheels chocks, etc. I plan to add another solar panel next month. This will give me an average of about 10 amps of charge rate which will top off those 4 batteries quickly. I also like the 30 amp Go-Power controller that was installed in the trailer which would handle up to 4 solar panels of you ever wanted that many.
hotfishtacos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2013, 12:31 PM   #24
Site Team
 
cpaharley2008's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: York, Pennsylvania
Trailer: 2016 2ndGen Escape 19' PRAIRIE SCHOONER pulled by 2014 Ram Hemi/8sp
Posts: 13,659
I'm curious, why does one need 460 a/h at their disposal? Doesn't the existing single panel and dual batteries of 230 a/h give you enough for your daily needs? I calculate about 50 a/h of use over 24 hours using everything in the trailer including heat. So the next day around 10 am I'm full again.
__________________
Jim
The two most important days in your life are the day you were born and the day you find out why………..Mark Twain
cpaharley2008 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2013, 12:51 PM   #25
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Escondido, California
Trailer: 2012 Escape 19'
Posts: 874
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpaharley2008 View Post
I'm curious, why does one need 460 a/h at their disposal? Doesn't the existing single panel and dual batteries of 230 a/h give you enough for your daily needs? I calculate about 50 a/h of use over 24 hours using everything in the trailer including heat. So the next day around 10 am I'm full again.
Jim,

It is a bit over the top but I calculated my worst-case daily draw at about 92 amps. My stereo alone pulls 2.5-3.5 amps depending on the volume. I like to run an electric grill off my 2000 watt inverter for breakfasts, a 400 watt blender for Margaritas, my coffee maker sometimes, an electric dehumidifier, extra lights, etc. I also want to have significant reserve while boon-docking if I run out of propane to run off the batteries. My goal is to be able to go out for a few weeks off the grid whenever I want to with no constraints. Also, I'm doing it because I can!...

Interstate Batteries literature gives guidance on how to extend battery life and states that if you don't take your charge level down below 12.45 volts you significantly increase the number of recharge cycles the batteries will support; 12.45 volts= 2200 cycles, 12.25 volts= 1000 cycles, 12.05 volts= 550 cycles, 11.90 volts= 250 cycles. As you can see the depth of the recharge cycle really affects battery life. This is another reason I added the extra capacity is to keep me normally above 12.45 volts.

....and how are you charged back by 10:00 when the panel you have puts out about 4.5 amps average and the sun has only been on the panel for about 4 hours maximum by then?? I figure the average charge back time is 6-8 hours for a whole day and the angle of the panel sitting horizontal measures 4.5 amps/hr average. . That would be 36 amps maximum charge back for a whole day. You must be using way less that 50ah per day.
hotfishtacos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2013, 02:13 PM   #26
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Terrace, British Columbia
Trailer: 2012 Escape 19
Posts: 306
hotfishtacos said: "I don't really understand the practical advantage of portable solar panels used for a 19' Escape trailer. We have a 19' and are glad the solar panel is mounted on the roof. It is in a great location on top of the trailer and puts out a lot of charge power."

Spoken by someone who obviously lives in sunny California .

Doug
__________________
We're still have'n fun...
NuthatchBC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2013, 02:13 PM   #27
Senior Member
 
barry's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Mission, British Columbia
Trailer: 2012 Escape "Classic" 5.0
Posts: 350
Quote:
Originally Posted by hotfishtacos View Post
I don't really understand the practical advantage of portable solar panels used for a 19' Escape trailer. We have a 19' and are glad the solar panel is mounted on the roof ........................


I tend to agree and I live in the rainy Fraser Valley and not sunny California. I've never run into a problem where I have low batteries with the solar panel on the roof and the really nice thing is that one never has to think about charging the batteries or pulling out the panels. Even over the winter sitting in the driveway the batteries are always topped up and ready to go.

I rarely camp in July and August, preferring the quieter shoulder seasons of spring and fall, so camping in the sun is where I like to be then!

If I find in the future that I want to camp in hotter climates and therefore in the shade I can always bring along a spare portable solar panel that could be hooked up IF I found that the permanent panel couldn't keep up at certain times. I would have to bring the panel out once in a while compared to all the time if it was only just a portable system.

I read of a woman that had her solar panel on the tug with the batteries as well and she plugged the trailer into that. She could park the tug in the sun and the trailer in the shade. An added bonus was that the vehicle charged the batteries as well if she went on a day trip without the trailer. I would imagine that their would have to be a battery in the trailer as well to keep the fridge running on propane but that would use very little juice for the odd time the batteries in the tug were not hooked up to the trailer ..... something to think about.

Barry
__________________
Photography website: https://bjustice.zenfolio.com/

2012 Escape "Classic" 5.0 / 2017 F150, 2.7 EcoBoost 4X4 Supercab
Former trailers: 2005 Escape 17B / 1972 Boler 13'
barry is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2013, 02:23 PM   #28
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Terrace, British Columbia
Trailer: 2012 Escape 19
Posts: 306
SeldomSeen said: "This is what I was hoping for, because I think it makes the use of a portable system less complicated...that is I don't have to worry about drilling holes in the trailer to get under the seat! "

Your charge controller will then need to be mounted on the panels or somewhere outside if you don't want to drill any holes.

Doug
__________________
We're still have'n fun...
NuthatchBC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2013, 02:37 PM   #29
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Terrace, British Columbia
Trailer: 2012 Escape 19
Posts: 306
In my case, I had no choice as to where to mount the panels. We already have our "panel-less" Escape 19 and I already have the panels and they are too large for the space available on the roof. Also, since I'm doing this myself, I would rather not fiddle around with drilling umpteen holes in the roof for mounting purposes. Having said that, however, if I were purchasing a new Escape today, having the factory mount the panels on the roof would definitely be something I would consider. There are pros and cons to both methods. It all depends on what you want from the system.

We have loads of room in our Tacoma for storage when the panels are not in use. The issue of theft when away from the camp site is definitely something to think about. Maybe put a sign on them that says "DANGER - 50,000 VOLTS". Most thieves are so stupid they would probably believe it .

Doug
__________________
We're still have'n fun...
NuthatchBC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2013, 02:42 PM   #30
Senior Member
 
gbaglo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: North Vancouver, British Columbia
Trailer: 2009 Escape 17B - "Toad". '08 Toyota RAV4 V6
Posts: 10,720
Quote:
Originally Posted by NuthatchBC View Post

"DANGER - 50,000 VOLTS". Most thieves are so stupid they would probably believe it .

Doug
Hasn't stopped them from stealing copper wire from lamp poles and transmission towers, sometimes with shocking results. But, nobody said they were smart.
__________________

__________________
2009 Escape 17B "Toad"
2008 Toyota RAV4 V6 Sport
North Vancouver, British Columbia

What happens to the hole when the cheese is gone?
- Bertolt Brecht
gbaglo is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off






» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:29 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2012 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.