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Old 12-06-2013, 08:40 PM   #31
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There's all kinds of solutions to be had, most require a current bush.

I've got a Bud, who's part of Ford Motor Company's R&D division and he also owns a Casita. He camps year around. There are issues with a single shell trailer with limited insulation, but he's found plugging in heat mats not only heat the trailer but keeps his tootsies warm when getting up in the middle of the night, and raises the temperature of the trailer over all: Heated Foot Warmer Mat - Commercial and Industrial Mats. I'm going to look into these... YMMV
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Old 12-06-2013, 08:45 PM   #32
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Brian,
The temperature high/low points is known as the swing and the digital eliminates the furnace over shooting the set point thereby causing it to get too hot and then it gets too cold.
I had an Atwood 15/22 variable speed furnace in my Lance. It comes on at 22,000 btu for 10minutes high speed and then slows the speed down and the heat to 15,000 BTU. There are variable speed propane rv furnaces available.
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Old 12-06-2013, 10:35 PM   #33
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Looks like the Propex HS2800 is $895 Westy Ventures / Propex heaters compared to about $450 US for the 12k Atwood according to Google.
Thanks for the data and link.
I'm not surprised by the difference, and for quieter operation on less power and propane, while leaving more storage space, I might pay that.

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In my stick built, by installing a digital thermostat I eliminated the wide temp swings we had with our original analog, the furnace instead came on more often for shorter periods as one would expect but certianly keeps it much more comfortable.
That makes sense: that particular digital thermostat had a narrower deadband than that particular mechanical thermostat (at least the way it was set).
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Old 12-06-2013, 10:58 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by cpaharley2008 View Post
The temperature high/low points is known as the swing and the digital eliminates the furnace over shooting the set point thereby causing it to get too hot and then it gets too cold.
Unless the digital is watching the rate of temperature increase and anticipating the overshoot that's just a narrower deadband... and simply a narrower deadband does essentially the same thing. The Atwood literature for their digital thermostat doesn't suggest any additional functionality in control of a single-speed furnace, but talks about "accuracy"; this sounds like simply a narrow deadband. Nothing magic about digital...

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Originally Posted by cpaharley2008 View Post
I had an Atwood 15/22 variable speed furnace in my Lance. It comes on at 22,000 btu for 10minutes high speed and then slows the speed down and the heat to 15,000 BTU. There are variable speed propane rv furnaces available.
That's the same design (in a smaller size) as my big Atwoods (23,000/34,000 BTU/hr) and what I was referring to as a crude two-step substitute for a variable furnace... still better than just one speed. By the way, according to Atwood it should step down based on temperature, not time. I've never heard of an RV furnace with more than two steps - anyone have an example?
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Old 12-07-2013, 09:16 AM   #35
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( By the way, according to Atwood it should step down based on temperature, not time. I've never heard of an RV furnace with more than two steps - anyone have an example?)

The digitally controlled heat pump system in our house is 2 step and based on temperature. The range (deadband) , is controllable up to 8 degrees ( 4 for each range ).
I have also never heard of an rv unit having more than 2 steps and seeing how our residential unit is very current and supposedly state of the art. I would be surprised if there are units commercially available for rv's with more than 2 ranges.IMHO
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Old 12-07-2013, 12:50 PM   #36
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Originally Posted by cpaharley2008 View Post
The temperature high/low points is known as the swing and the digital eliminates the furnace over shooting the set point thereby causing it to get too hot and then it gets too cold.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian B-P View Post
Unless the digital is watching the rate of temperature increase and anticipating the overshoot that's just a narrower deadband...
As it turns out, this alternate approach is also used, and called a heat anticipator. The rate of temperature increase isn't actually measured, just assumed, but the furnace can switch on a narrow or zero deadband without cycling excessively. The illustration is a mechanical thermostat - no electronics needed, but of course a digital thermostat could easy offer this feature.

Whatever the method, the result with a fixed rate of furnace output will still be a compromise between tight temperature control and minimized cycling - you can't have both. The small volume and high heat loss rate of a travel trailer will accentuate this problem.
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Old 12-07-2013, 12:58 PM   #37
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I ran across a manual for a thermostat (S1-THPU32P7S - this one's digital) with adjustments for both the deadband and the "Cycles Per Hour", which is a timed limit on cycling. One could set zero deadband and pick a desired CPH, or put no limit on CPH and set the deadband (or "swing") wide enough - up to 6°F - to get the desired behaviour.

Another example, Carrier's Debonair 33CSSN2-WC includes this in its description:
Quote:
To avoid short cycling and protect equipment, an adjustable dead band can be configured to user's specifications (from 1° to 6 F) and in cycles per hour (2 to 6).
So, you have deadband, anticipators, and CPH controls... all having similar effect. A thermostat with any one of them would be helpful. It seems likely that mechanical units may have anticipators, digital units commonly have CPH settings, and both may have adjustable deadbands.
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Old 12-07-2013, 01:59 PM   #38
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I believe we are now talking about the same thing, Brian, the anticipator tries to eliminate the temperature swing. Either way, with the digital you can (1) set the anticipator or swing to be from 1 to 4 degrees and (2) it has a lower setting than most factory coil units, so you have a freeze setting of say 40 degrees to keep the unit from freezing, and (3) it displays the current temperature and set temperature in digital read outs, a lot easier on senior eyes than counting the little black marks on the dial.
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Old 12-07-2013, 02:00 PM   #39
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I'll also propose a heater strip add on to your AC unit if you've got one installed (and have shore power). No louder then running the AC in the summer, no compressor/fan cycling (if the appliance cycling noise is the sleeping issue), good air distribution to the far reaches of the trailer to battle condensation, low cost < $50 self installed in my polar cub which is pre wired for the installation (plug and heat ;-).
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Old 12-07-2013, 02:07 PM   #40
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Yes, had one in my Escape 19 with the Polar Cub. Not sure it is offered with the Dometic unit. Good for eliminating the morning chills while hooked up. May have to look into seeing if it can be bought from Dometic and can be added by the owner easily.
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