High Lift and Stabilizers (17B) - Page 3 - Escape Trailer Owners Community

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Old 09-28-2015, 05:40 PM   #21
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I was wondering about a composite deck material like Trex. It can be ripped and routed so I would imagine it could also be cut into disks to attach to the sand pads. .
Mmmm, my son just used that to do his deck. I'm going to have to look at his scrap. He already wants me to bring my truck over and take all of the scrap cedar end cuts from the railings....

Good idea.

And the pads are square, the pads that the RV store had that didn't fit were round.
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Old 09-28-2015, 07:52 PM   #22
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I have been looking for a place that sells that food grade white plastic like the kind they make cutting boards out of, but about an inch thick.
The place I used to go to for plastic has disappeared.
Anyways I want to screw the plastic onto the bottom of the foot plate so that I don't have to crank so much and the stabilizers will be a bit more stable.
You can cut up white cutting boards and just screw/bolt the pieces together to laminate whatever thickness you want. However, that material is UHMW and designed to be non-stick, so not too sure I'd want to depend on it to hold on a grade! Think I'd just use wood and replace it when it's worn out.
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Old 09-28-2015, 10:36 PM   #23
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You can cut up white cutting boards and just screw/bolt the pieces together to laminate whatever thickness you want. However, that material is UHMW and designed to be non-stick, so not too sure I'd want to depend on it to hold on a grade! Think I'd just use wood and replace it when it's worn out.
I don't think stabilizer grip should be an issue. Stabilizers manage vertical movement. Wheel chocks should be used to manage horizontal movement.
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Old 09-28-2015, 10:44 PM   #24
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That tree product is not to hard to work with but it's pretty dense and heavy. Would not absorb water in a puddle though. Deck builders would probably have some free scraps? Worth a try
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Old 09-28-2015, 10:51 PM   #25
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I was wondering about a composite deck material like Trex. It can be ripped and routed so I would imagine it could also be cut into disks to attach to the sand pads. I had a jig to cut circular disks on my (sold) table saw but there are other ways to do it. To reduce weight a hole saw could probably be used to remove material without affecting performance.

I would not use any artificial decking material. Its recycled plastic stuffed with max amounts of sawdust and I doubt it would have adequate torsional strength ... especially if "lightening holes" were cut into it. Think you would be ahead by stacking glued together plywood for an adequate thick sandwich.

Or

Diamond plate aluminum top and bottom with plywood center sandwich with lightening holes hidden between the aluminum plates.

I don't know?

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Old 09-28-2015, 11:06 PM   #26
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I'd just buy a bag of Lynx Levelers.
Oh wait, I did.
Made of plastic, they don't absorb water and are relatively light weight.
They are already full of holes.
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Old 09-29-2015, 01:40 AM   #27
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I don't think stabilizer grip should be an issue. Stabilizers manage vertical movement. Wheel chocks should be used to manage horizontal movement.
Single-leg stabilizers can help quite a bit with horizontal movement side-to-side as well, which is good because no matter how well they are chocked, tires are a bit wiggly side-to-side... and the tongue jack doesn't do much horizontally. I'm not talking about keeping the trailer from sliding away down a side slope, just reducing the amount is jiggles around as people move in it.

I added this style of stabilizer to my current trailer, and they help.
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Old 09-29-2015, 10:38 AM   #28
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Single-leg stabilizers can help quite a bit with horizontal movement side-to-side as well, which is good because no matter how well they are chocked, tires are a bit wiggly side-to-side... and the tongue jack doesn't do much horizontally. I'm not talking about keeping the trailer from sliding away down a side slope, just reducing the amount is jiggles around as people move in it.

I added this style of stabilizer to my current trailer, and they help.
I had never noticed much if any movement in that plane in my little trailer but it also had 4 single leg stabilizers with lots of extension length which under normal conditions created a very wide and stable stance on large metal sand pads.
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Old 09-29-2015, 11:17 AM   #29
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It is really about trying to set up or take down in the rain.
Running around, squatting down and handling slimey pieces of wood sort of sucks...
I'm just trying to simplify those parts of the task.

And, I guess if the pads on the end of the feet were thicker, they would have a wider stance and be more stable and with less cranking.
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Old 09-29-2015, 11:21 AM   #30
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We routinely have blocks under stabilizers because the stabilizers are only supposed to be extended so far.
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