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Old 06-26-2017, 10:50 PM   #1
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Replaceable Propane Tanks

In the recent issue of Trailer Life I was reading about a new trailer and they mentioned that it uses the replaceable propane tanks. I don't have the issue next to me so I don't remember the trailer brand/name or of the tanks. I believe it's the type of tanks you can get at the grocery store or wherever.

Has anyone switched their tanks to this style?

Pros and cons of doing so?

Just a thought I'm pondering.

Thanks
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Old 06-26-2017, 10:51 PM   #2
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I don't really know what is meant by "replaceable" tanks. They're all replaceable, and a 20lb tank is a 20lb tank whether it's a refill or an exchange.

That being said, we never exchange ours and we refill instead - mainly because it's less money, and we know our tanks are in good shape.

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Old 06-27-2017, 01:09 AM   #3
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Do you mean disposable cylinder (tanks), which are a one-pound size? That would be extremely expensive and wasteful for anyone who uses propane for the furnace or water heater, and it's hard to imagine wanting to use those in a trailer.

Do you mean refillable one-pound cylinders? If you're using the little one-pound disposable cylinders on something like a portable camp stove, and these cylinders and refills for them are available in your area (such as from U-Haul in some U.S. locations), that should save money and reduce waste.

Do you mean exchange tanks? They're normal 20-pound capacity cylinders (tanks), but instead of paying for a fill you pay much more to trade your empty cylinder for one which is about 3/4 full. Good if that's all you can find, or if your own cylinder is about to expire (at ten or twelve years old or whatever it is now where you are).

Other than those, I don't know what "replaceable" would mean because, as Robert said, all normal trailer cylinders are portable and so readily replaceable. Motorhomes, on the other hand, usually use built-in cylinders which are not replaced unless they are damaged.
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Old 06-27-2017, 01:26 AM   #4
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Looked at a Happy Camper 1 yesterday and they use the 1 pound bottles
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Old 06-27-2017, 01:46 AM   #5
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The only other cylinders I have seen are see-through and some of those have had big problems.

I take you that you mean exchangeable. Agree with Robert on that. Ours are better. Just refill.
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Old 06-27-2017, 02:38 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by sunrisetrucker View Post
Looked at a Happy Camper 1 yesterday and they use the 1 pound bottles
That makes some sense to me for the Happier Camper, because it uses a reconfigurable set of modules, and so doesn't have a permanent kitchen or any easy way to accommodate built-in propane plumbing from an outside-mounted 20-pound cylinder.

This is a built-in California trailer with an available rooftop air conditioner, but no available furnace or water heater; they'll sell you a butane stove, Mr. Heater portable propane heater, and a black tube for water to leave in the sun to get warm. The approach is very different from an Escape.
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Old 06-27-2017, 11:49 AM   #7
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I guess the article mentions the exchangeable tanks. I'm clueless about all that as we've never used propane until now. Well, we did have an outdoor grill but hardly ever used it, it was rusting and we junked it last year.

As I said, I was just curious about it as I've never paid attention to that sort of thing.
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Old 06-27-2017, 01:23 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian B-P View Post
That makes some sense to me for the Happier Camper, because it uses a reconfigurable set of modules, and so doesn't have a permanent kitchen or any easy way to accommodate built-in propane plumbing from an outside-mounted 20-pound cylinder.

This is a built-in California trailer with an available rooftop air conditioner, but no available furnace or water heater; they'll sell you a butane stove, Mr. Heater portable propane heater, and a black tube for water to leave in the sun to get warm. The approach is very different from an Escape.
Happier Camper is going for a totally different customer. The trailer is built for adventurers... scuba divers, mountain bikers, kayakers, etc. The ability to load toys easily, only take the "furniture" you want for a trip and to remove everything from the inside and hose it out with water... is highly desirable for certain people (special build for the hose out). I freak out when I splash water out of the sink onto the floor in Ten Forward

One of the neat accessories, is one of the bench cubes can be this:
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Old 06-27-2017, 01:30 PM   #9
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How much space do 20 1lb. containers take up ( the equivalent of one 20 lb tank )? Hope the outdoors types take the empties home with them.
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Old 06-27-2017, 02:14 PM   #10
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1lb of propane goes a long way if you dont have furnace, hot water or fridge that runs off propane.. we carry a 11# container and propane is only used for cooking, on a typical one week trip we use maybe 1lb..
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Old 06-27-2017, 02:55 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by gbaglo View Post
How much space do 20 1lb. containers take up ( the equivalent of one 20 lb tank )? Hope the outdoors types take the empties home with them.
Since the packing density of the two cylinder shapes is similar, and the one-pound cylinders have a small valve assembly, a rectangular box the same width and height of a typical 20-pound tank should hold about 20 one-pounders. You could stack the one-pound cylinders in 3x3 layers, two layers high, and lay three more on top for about the same package.

... but yes, it's a silly pile of cylinders, most of which will be thrown in garbage bins.
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