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Old 04-05-2016, 09:16 PM   #31
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Jim: It's basically an OM, with a slightly deeper body and a short scale (24.9). BTW, also 'Made in Canada' - a Northwood handmade in Sorrento.
Those are nice guitars. I have a friend in the Shuswap, and live less than 30 minutes from Sorrento, that has a Northwood, though not sure what model. Fantastic deep sound. I think he mortgaged the house to pay for it though. He did use it playing gigs. Sadly, he has ALS, and not too long to live. He is only 8 days older than me too. I imagine his daughter, who is a great musician too, will get it.
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Old 04-06-2016, 12:52 AM   #32
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Wifey is trying to figure out how to bring her cello along.......
One solution is to go electronic. You can stay with wood if you want (carbon fibre if you want greater tolerance to moisture and temperature changes - at a price premium), and can get one with folding or removable parts for the locations where the player braces against the instrument. Yamaha's Silent Cello line is an example; "silent" meaning that without a soundbox you hear it primarily through headphones or an amplifier, like an electric guitar.

They're a couple thousand dollars, and so not a frivolous purchase for most of us.

No, I don't play cello - I was just interested in them because my grandfather played one.

The same logic would apply to a guitar - go electric, choose a model that doesn't have a large body, and save space while reducing the risk of damage.
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Old 04-06-2016, 08:55 AM   #33
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One solution is to go electronic....

...The same logic would apply to a guitar - go electric, choose a model that doesn't have a large body, and save space while reducing the risk of damage.
How would that work for those boondockers out there? Would electric instruments work on 12V DC, or would you need an inverter? With the inverter, would you drain your batteries during an evening of entertaining? Maybe you would need a generator. Although I am definitely musically challenged, I think that I would keep it simple and go the non-electrical route.
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Old 04-06-2016, 10:01 AM   #34
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One solution is to go electronic.
The same logic would apply to a guitar - go electric, choose a model that doesn't have a large body, and save space while reducing the risk of damage.
I take my acoustic because it's light, and I can play it softly. I just wedge it on the bed, using pillows, and at night it lies on the table.

My electric guitar is comparatively heavy. And there are battery powered amps.
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Old 04-06-2016, 10:40 AM   #35
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My electric telecaster amazes me how well it holds up to rough usage and temperature / humidity swings. I use a small, 9V battery powered amp (there are lots to choose from). The amp also has a headphone jack so I can practice and noodle around to my heart's content without disturbing my wife or other campers. I can definitely recommend travelling with a solid body electric.
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Old 04-06-2016, 05:27 PM   #36
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How would that work for those boondockers out there? Would electric instruments work on 12V DC, or would you need an inverter?
A traditional electric guitar would certainly "plug into the wall", and so it (actually the amp) would need an inverter. Modern electronic instruments are routinely used without a cord (radio linked to the sound system) so they're apparently run by small batteries. For an example, Yamaha's Silent Cello SVC50 doesn't have a radio (you plug headphones into it, or plug it into the line input of an amp), but the cello itself runs on two AA batteries (including driving your headphones if that's how you're using it).

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With the inverter, would you drain your batteries during an evening of entertaining? Maybe you would need a generator.
Rocking a stadium takes big power; I hope no one is playing loudly enough in a campground for power consumption to be an issue for a trailer.

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Although I am definitely musically challenged, I think that I would keep it simple and go the non-electrical route.
Certainly fully acoustic is simpler. Electronic is just a possibility that might be of interest to those with larger instruments.

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My electric guitar is comparatively heavy.
I've only played acoustic guitar (long ago, and poorly), but when I picked up an electric I was surprised how heavy it was - most have a big thick chunk of solid wood as a body... not the ideal lightweight travel choice.
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Old 04-06-2016, 05:42 PM   #37
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If we don't were gonna blow a fifty amp fuse

Used to work with the roadies for concerts in the parks. They would carney right onto lugs in the panel until we finally made the promoter contract with a qualified sound production company with union electricians. We all slept better then.
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Old 04-14-2016, 10:12 PM   #38
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Electric instruments

So what about amplification for instruments? Is that very successful in a campground setting?

The reason I ask is, I have a stand up bass that I will not
expose to the variety of climates and temperature swings of
camping. I have a much smaller viable option in my electric bass,
but until now I've not thought of camping with it. Also have
a keyboard, again I've not thought of camping with it.

SO what are your experiences with such as these?
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Old 04-14-2016, 10:31 PM   #39
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So what about amplification for instruments? Is that very successful in a campground setting?

The reason I ask is, I have a stand up bass that I will not
expose to the variety of climates and temperature swings of
camping. I have a much smaller viable option in my electric bass,
but until now I've not thought of camping with it. Also have
a keyboard, again I've not thought of camping with it.

SO what are your experiences with such as these?
I imagine you could take along a small battery powered amp.

Have you looked into a smaller acoustic base. I have a friend that has one the size of a regular guitar, and he plans to pick up an even smaller one.

A good friend who camps with me lots is a drummer, and a real gear head. He has brought with him a few electronic step-ups, including drum pants, but nothing beats him with one of his bongo sets to accompany our acoustic music.
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Old 04-14-2016, 10:50 PM   #40
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I imagine you could take along a small battery powered amp.

Have you looked into a smaller acoustic base. I have a friend that has one the size of a regular guitar, and he plans to pick up an even smaller one.

A good friend who camps with me lots is a drummer, and a real gear head. He has brought with him a few electronic step-ups, including drum pants, but nothing beats him with one of his bongo sets to accompany our acoustic music.
Well, it sounds like amplification, if used carefully, is a viable option. I just checked my son's little Fender Jam, and it's 75 watts, so my 140 w. inverter will run it. I'm in!!!

Regarding small basses, I saw a Gretch 5-string (I think) hollow body at a Guitar Center a couple of years ago, that I drooled over, but we had just ordered our Escape, so I couldn't even think about it.

I did borrow a mando-cello from a friend who also is a classical cellist, but it was hard to remember that the tuning, and thus, the fingering is different. It did have a nice mellow sound, and of course, the excellent range.
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