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Old 08-25-2015, 02:02 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Greg A View Post
Now that is one fine piece of road troubleshooting. The multimeter is a very good thing to have with you and saves a lot of time. Awesome that you had it with you.
Nice work!
Thanks Greg for the nice compliment! Now when I get home think I will put a better one in trailer . Important tool I see ! Pat
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Old 08-25-2015, 07:46 PM   #22
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Cool Preventative medicine?

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Thanks Jim and everyone ! Got the multimeter out and the fixture has power . Led is good , wire looks good . Found after I turned the socket where it attaches to bracket on fixture, light is now working . Water made a little bit corrosion so it was not making a good connection. When I turned it , it cleaned it up a bit . I now need to seal up these fixtures . Found also a little bit corrosion on driver side even though light was working . Happy to have a porch light tonight ! Pat
You mention sealing the fixture. My experience in industry was that no matter how well any outdoor device was sealed, moisture always found its way in. Perhaps sealing the top and leaving the bottom open would be better. Or sealing and drilling a tiny drain hole at the bottom. What are others experience? I know Cpaharley has mentioned drilling drain holes. I also have some special grease designed for electrical connections. I wonder if that might be good. After driving in the rain I notice moisture condensed on the inside of the lenses. Please chime in!
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Old 08-25-2015, 09:29 PM   #23
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You mention sealing the fixture. My experience in industry was that no matter how well any outdoor device was sealed, moisture always found its way in. Perhaps sealing the top and leaving the bottom open would be better. Or sealing and drilling a tiny drain hole at the bottom. What are others experience? I know Cpaharley has mentioned drilling drain holes. I also have some special grease designed for electrical connections. I wonder if that might be good. After driving in the rain I notice moisture condensed on the inside of the lenses. Please chime in!
Hi Carl . Good idea to make a drain hole at bottom . Also that's what I will do is seal top of light with silicone . The worry I still have is the switch on bottom of light . I think it is dialectic grease is also a good idea if it is ok with led's . I have used it on my camper plug . It conducts electricity and helps to keep water out . Just need to know if ok with led's .I have noticed the led 's are touchy . There wasn't much corrosion on these bulbs . Water always gets in these lights and other lights had more corrosion and still worked . Progress I guess . Pat
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Old 08-25-2015, 09:42 PM   #24
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According to this Wiki article, dialectic grease is not a conductor. It is an insulator. So careful how you apply it. You wouldn't want to get it on the contacts unless the contact areas penetrate the grease.

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Dielectric grease is electrically insulating and does not break down when high voltage is applied. It is often applied to electrical connectors, particularly those containing rubber gaskets, as a means of lubricating and sealing rubber portions of the connector without arcing.
A common use of dielectric grease is in high-voltage connections associated with gasoline engine spark plugs. The grease is applied to the rubber boot of the plug wire. This helps the rubber boot slide onto the ceramic insulator of the plug. The grease also acts to seal the rubber boot, while at the same time preventing the rubber from becoming stuck to the ceramic. Generally spark plugs are located in areas of high temperature, and the grease is formulated to withstand the temperature range expected. It can be applied to the actual contact as well, because the contact pressure is sufficient to penetrate the grease. Doing so on such high pressure contact surfaces between different metals has the advantage of sealing the contact area against electrolytes that might cause rapid galvanic corrosion.
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Old 08-26-2015, 12:20 AM   #25
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According to this Wiki article, dialectic grease is not a conductor. It is an insulator. So careful how you apply it. You wouldn't want to get it on the contacts unless the contact areas penetrate the grease.

Quote:
Dielectric grease is electrically insulating and does not break down when high voltage is applied. It is often applied to electrical connectors, particularly those containing rubber gaskets, as a means of lubricating and sealing rubber portions of the connector without arcing.
A common use of dielectric grease is in high-voltage connections associated with gasoline engine spark plugs. The grease is applied to the rubber boot of the plug wire. This helps the rubber boot slide onto the ceramic insulator of the plug. The grease also acts to seal the rubber boot, while at the same time preventing the rubber from becoming stuck to the ceramic. Generally spark plugs are located in areas of high temperature, and the ielectricgrease is formulated to withstand the temperature range expected. It can be applied to the actual contact as well, because the contact pressure is sufficient to penetrate the grease. Doing so on such high pressure contact surfaces between different metals has the advantage of sealing the contact area against electrolytes that might cause rapid galvanic corrosion.
'Hi Glenn I was going by my camper cord that plugs into truck -my tail lights and brake lights weren't working . I was camping with my son in Law and he took me to a Napa auto parts and we bought the dielectric Grease on put on the brass pins on the plug and everything worked from then on for years . He was retired Navy and that was his job . So what do I know . So it is a no on the dielectric grease ? How can I seal that switch on bottom of fixture . I will drill hole at bottom and seal top of lens with silicone . That's ok? Pat
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Old 08-26-2015, 12:42 AM   #26
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Seems from the Wiki entry that dialectic grease will keep moisture from reaching the contacts, but if it's on the contacts then there has to be enough pressure to push the grease out of the way. A buddy used it on my left tail light and on the tow and trailer plugs and I didn't get them working properly until I removed it, so that the contacts made contact.

On exterior lights, I imagine that the manufacturers of lights have considered drilling holes, even tested that idea, and rejected it. I don't know what the answer is, but I suspect that's not the solution.
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Old 08-26-2015, 10:25 AM   #27
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Seems from the Wiki entry that dialectic grease will keep moisture from reaching the contacts, but if it's on the contacts then there has to be enough pressure to push the grease out of the way. A buddy used it on my left tail light and on the tow and trailer plugs and I didn't get them working properly until I removed it, so that the contacts made contact.

On exterior lights, I imagine that the manufacturers of lights have considered drilling holes, even tested that idea, and rejected it. I don't know what the answer is, but I suspect that's not the solution.
Ok Glen no drilling holes then and need to still check on the dielectric grease idea . Back to square one . Pat
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Old 08-26-2015, 12:12 PM   #28
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I no longer have any moisture in any of my lights after drilling small holes on the bottom of the ones that were showing moisture inside.
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Old 08-27-2015, 12:12 AM   #29
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I no longer have any moisture in any of my lights after drilling small holes on the bottom of the ones that were showing moisture inside.
Jim how many holes and how big ? Also what can I do with that switch at bottom ? Any pics where you did holes ? Pat
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Old 08-27-2015, 08:25 AM   #30
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Two holes per light, smallest bit available, on the bottom.
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