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Old 04-05-2015, 11:52 AM   #1
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Generator Question

If I have a 12V battery on my bumper and a 12V battery in a sealed, vented, battery box under the rear bed in my 17'b where would I hook up a generator to charge the batteries?
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Old 04-05-2015, 11:56 AM   #2
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If you don't mind how long it takes you just plug the shore power cord into the generator ( I'm speaking Honda ). Best, faster, to go direct to battery terminals though.
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Old 04-05-2015, 11:56 AM   #3
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would this be a suitable generator.
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Old 04-05-2015, 11:57 AM   #4
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If you don't mind how long it takes you just plug the shore power cord into the generator ( I'm speaking Honda ). Best to go direct to battery terminals though.
Can I just hook up to my bumper battery?
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Old 04-05-2015, 12:04 PM   #5
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Can't you charge the batteries through the embilical by hooking that up to the generator? Or does that require something you don't have?
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Old 04-05-2015, 12:04 PM   #6
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Since a Honda is on my list I looked at that ad and thought, whoa, good price, then I saw it's only 1000 watt. The 2000 isn't too much more and is more versatile.

You can connect to the one battery and charge both if you have a battery switch and it's set to "both". However, if the batteries are different ages, state of discharge etc. it's better to charge one at a time.

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Old 04-05-2015, 12:17 PM   #7
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I too would have got the Honda 2000, but at the time I didn't want to spend the extra bucks. All you need is the 1000 for charging batteries, but a 2000 would be useful around the house during a power outage.
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Old 04-05-2015, 12:18 PM   #8
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Can't you charge the batteries through the embilical by hooking that up to the generator? Or does that require something you don't have?
You can, and I do, but it takes a lot longer to charge.
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Old 04-05-2015, 12:32 PM   #9
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Great for charging batteries or 120v for small appliances

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Old 04-05-2015, 12:39 PM   #10
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I have the Honda EU2000i. In the manual the maximum DC output is 8 amps. When charging the 12V battery for our MinnKota electric motor I plugged a battery charger into the AC outlet and believed that I was getting the 15A output the charger is capable of. However, with the Honda having a maximum AC output of 13.3 amps (just read this in the manual now), the charge rate of the battery charger plugged into the Honda's AC is probably only 13.3 amps (or less). [I would appreciate comment on this from any electrical experts on the forum.)

At the same time as I charge the 12 V battery I also plug the trailer's shoreline cable into an AC outlet on the Honda to charge the trailer's two 6V batteries and it handles both loads fine. In our old stick built trailer, running just the fridge, water pump and lights in the evening meant we would run the generator for 2-3 hours every 3-4 days. With our LED lighting in the Escape I expect we could get even longer intervals between generator use, though as we will still have to charge the boat battery we will probably top up the trailer at the same time.

I had considered buying the Honda1000i, but opted for the more capable 2000 model and am glad I did. If just charging the trailer batteries (2 x 6V) it runs at just above and idle, so it is very quiet. If I add the other 12V battery to the load it is noisier, but no where near maximum speed. I think that the 1000i would be running a lot faster and probably making more noise for the same electrical load.

Another reason I'm glad we have the 2000i is that it is capable of running the Escape's air conditioner, something that Reace confirmed for us on our last visit to ETI.

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Old 04-05-2015, 12:39 PM   #11
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There is about 20lbs difference between the 2. Might matter to some people.

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Old 04-05-2015, 12:42 PM   #12
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If desert camping, ac can be important on some days.

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Old 04-05-2015, 12:52 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Bobbito View Post
I have the Honda EU2000i. In the manual the maximum DC output is 8 amps. When charging the 12V battery for our MinnKota electric motor I plugged a battery charger into the AC outlet and believed that I was getting the 15A output the charger is capable of. However, with the Honda having a maximum AC output of 13.3 amps (just read this in the manual now), the charge rate of the battery charger plugged into the Honda's AC is probably only 13.3 amps (or less). [I would appreciate comment on this from any electrical experts on the forum.)

Bob K
The 13.3 amps is at 120 V. Your 15A charger will have no problems producing it's rated output. I run my 30A charger on the boat with my 1000W Yamaha generator without any problems.
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Old 04-05-2015, 01:03 PM   #14
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Thanks, Joe. It explains why when I once tried the direct DC charging from the Honda it took so long comparatively. So another electrical question. Do you know what the maximum charge rate for the trailer's batteries would be on the Escape using shore power?

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Old 04-05-2015, 01:19 PM   #15
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Thanks, Joe. It explains why when I once tried the direct DC charging from the Honda it took so long comparatively. So another electrical question. Do you know what the maximum charge rate for the trailer's batteries would be on the Escape using shore power?

Bob K
That question has been asked many a time, no one seems to know. Some thougts are that it will depend on how much is running on 120v at the same time.

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Old 04-05-2015, 01:52 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J Mac View Post
Can I just hook up to my bumper battery?
Yes, but the inside battery will get a lower voltage due to resistance in tne wiring between them, so the battery on the bumper will get more fully charged.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Donna D. View Post
Can't you charge the batteries through the embilical by hooking that up to the generator?
Yes, but it will charge more slowly and will get less fully charged - even given any amount of time - due to the resistance of the wiring to the batteries.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobbito View Post
I have the Honda EU2000i. In the manual the maximum DC output is 8 amps.
Although this output is convenient, it isn't a great charger. Although it is a roundabout method, running a charger from the generator's AC output will probably work better.
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Old 04-05-2015, 04:05 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobbito View Post
Thanks, Joe. It explains why when I once tried the direct DC charging from the Honda it took so long comparatively. So another electrical question. Do you know what the maximum charge rate for the trailer's batteries would be on the Escape using shore power?

Bob K
Terrible, is my conclusion and the batteries will never get fully charged with the WFCO built in controller. The best rate I could get from the WFCO was 13.7 volts, far from the specs that state 14.4 and way off the recommended charge rates for the dual 6 volt batteries from Interstate at 15.4.

There are several threads that cover battery charge rates and results.

WFCO Charge Rates

Is Your Battery Really Charged?

WFCO Converter Battery Charge Rates
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Old 04-05-2015, 06:35 PM   #18
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Terrible, is my conclusion and the batteries will never get fully charged with the WFCO built in controller. The best rate I could get from the WFCO was 13.7 volts, far from the specs that state 14.4 and way off the recommended charge rates for the dual 6 volt batteries from Interstate at 15.4.
There are several threads that cover battery charge rates and results.
WFCO Charge Rates
Is Your Battery Really Charged?
WFCO Converter Battery Charge Rates
According to the interstate deep cycle charging charts the BULK RATE charge is 14.46 volts. The EQUALIZATION charge rate is 15.6 volts and only for two hours. If you are charging the battery at 15.6 volts there will be a lot of off gassing and the electrolyte level needs to be frequently checked during the two hours equalization charge so the level does not drop below the top of the plates.
http://www.batteries-faq.com/activek...p?questionid=1
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Old 04-05-2015, 07:30 PM   #19
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In reference to charge rates of the on board WFCO 8955 converter.
Ran my twin 6v Interstates down to 76% charge via the fridge and kicked on the converter, nothing else running save a few indicators, gas monitor, and such.

After 8 hours I let solar finish the job the next morning.

As you can see this jives with Paul's statement about the lack of the WFCO to go into absorption mode.

Only tried this once.
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Old 04-05-2015, 07:48 PM   #20
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You are correct Bob on the charge rate for Equalization, it is at 15.6 volts. I was expressing the charge rate for Absorption of 6 volt batteries and according to the table you linked the rate is 15.3 volts. Those having the slightly older model U2200 6 volt batteries that Escape used would charge at the 15.4 volt rate. These batteries need to be charged at an exceptionally high voltage. You make a good point of off gassing and checking water levels. I do note some smell when charging at that rate, however I have only been able to achieve those rates using a solar controller and panel. Since that would be day time and sunny the trailer is frequently unoccupied so it is not noticeable and the sealed/vented battery box should handle off gassing properly.

The Trojan brand of 6 volt batteries use similar high voltage charge rates, their recommended rate is 14.8 volts at Absorption.

Equalization is another thing, I have barely been able to charge at the recommended Absorption rate using 160 watts of panel. Achieving the Equalization rate might take double the wattage and only in mid summer. That said, Equalization may not be necessary if you keep charge levels above 50% and can charge at the recommended voltages.

The key point I keep making is that the WFCO built in controller is charging at 13.7 volts, a far cry from the recommended 15.3 volts. I have yet to find any device, other than four models of solar controllers, that can charge at that rate. If you are boondocking and plug into shore power for the 24 hours before you leave, you are departing with a battery that is only filled to 75% of usable capacity. See the link above to "Is Your Battery Really Charged?

Bob #2
Other forums have mentioned this characteristic of the WFCO, it always stays in bulk mode and will not charge at the desirable Absorption rate. I read one post where the user would turn on all lighting, the furnace and water pump before plugging into shore power, all in an effort to get the WFCO into Absorption mode.
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