Hot Water Heating - Escape Trailer Owners Community

Go Back   Escape Trailer Owners Community > Escape Tech > Problem Solving | Owners helping each other
Click Here to Login

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-28-2018, 03:56 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Seattle, Washington
Trailer: Escape 19'
Posts: 99
Hot Water Heating

In a recent post (Weekends at Whistler: Final Update), I mentioned that the first 2 cups' of water from the kitchen tap are close to hot when we first turn it on in the morning, or at the end of the ski day. We believe this results from the lines, which run from the driver's side to the passenger's side of the trailer, under the floor, capturing and storing the heat generated by a small (375 watt) heater that we keep in the open area between the two rear bench seats.

This has led me to wonder whether we might run additional lines along the inside of the bench seats, coiling or flaking them, so that we have more than 2 cups of hot water in the winter. Can we tap into the cold water line after it exits on the passenger side, extend it by 15 feet or so, flaking it in the passenger-side bench seat? Years ago, before we had plumbing in our summer cabin, I coiled a 50' garden hose on the granite and had more than enough boiling hot water to do dishes and shower. I was thinking that we might do the same in the trailer.

Can you think of any down-side to doing this? Or any precautions we should take?

We have huge amounts of excess storage capacity under our rear bench seats, which will never be used; multiple feet of water line, storing the heat generated by the space heater, would be a good use of the space.
__________________

egraham is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2018, 06:21 PM   #2
Commercial Member
 
tractors1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Hillsboro, Oregon
Trailer: 2014 Escape 21 - "Felicity"
Posts: 2,556
Quote:
Originally Posted by egraham View Post

We have huge amounts of excess storage capacity under our rear bench seats, which will never be used; multiple feet of water line, storing the heat generated by the space heater, would be a good use of the space.
Sounds like a fine plan to me!
__________________

__________________
Charlie Y

Need custom storage to your design? Don't drill holes!
www.RVWidgetWorks.com
tractors1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2018, 12:12 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
sclifrickson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Port Townsend, Washington
Trailer: 2010 17B “MATT”, then 2017 19 “Lilly”
Posts: 1,199
Quote:
Originally Posted by egraham View Post
In a recent post (Weekends at Whistler: Final Update), I mentioned that the first 2 cups' of water from the kitchen tap are close to hot when we first turn it on in the morning, or at the end of the ski day. We believe this results from the lines, which run from the driver's side to the passenger's side of the trailer, under the floor, capturing and storing the heat generated by a small (375 watt) heater that we keep in the open area between the two rear bench seats.



This has led me to wonder whether we might run additional lines along the inside of the bench seats, coiling or flaking them, so that we have more than 2 cups of hot water in the winter. Can we tap into the cold water line after it exits on the passenger side, extend it by 15 feet or so, flaking it in the passenger-side bench seat? Years ago, before we had plumbing in our summer cabin, I coiled a 50' garden hose on the granite and had more than enough boiling hot water to do dishes and shower. I was thinking that we might do the same in the trailer.



Can you think of any down-side to doing this? Or any precautions we should take?



We have huge amounts of excess storage capacity under our rear bench seats, which will never be used; multiple feet of water line, storing the heat generated by the space heater, would be a good use of the space.

Do you have the two-way water heater?
__________________
There is no such thing as political correctness. Just correctness.
sclifrickson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2018, 07:08 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
rubicon327's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Burlington Twp., New Jersey
Trailer: 2010 Escape 19
Posts: 2,941
I understand the concept, but I don’t think this is a good bang for the buck. You have stated you have full hook-ups. Why don’t you just flip the hot water heater on (propane or electric if you have the dual mode model) when you get back from skiing? It heats the water pretty quickly. If you have the dual mode you can use both propane and electric simultaneously.

On edit: In reading your other thread I see you bypassed the hot water heater for simplicity. I assume you are concerned with freezing of the hot water tank when not in use.
__________________
“One way to get the most out of life is to look upon it as an adventure.”― W.F.
rubicon327 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2018, 09:11 AM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Seattle, Washington
Trailer: Escape 19'
Posts: 99
That's exactly it. Unless we keep the water in the tank hot at all times, it could freeze up. Unlikely, given that it is inside, but the insulation that keeps the water hot also prevents the heat inside the trailer from warming up the water while the heater is turned off.

In our Casita, we had dual propane-electric controls, but both were inside the trailer, and we could quickly switch off the electric heat in the tank when I was cooking, or otherwise loading the electrical circuit. We had asked Escape for this option, but it's not available. And it is just too big a nuisance going outside in the winter to muck about with the electrical switch on the water heater.

Why not then use the propane, you ask? Because we are gone during the week and need full tanks to back up the space heaters in the event of a power failure.
egraham is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2018, 09:22 AM   #6
Site Team
 
cpaharley2008's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Chilliwack, British Columbia
Trailer: Escape#4, 2019 Escape21 DejaView pulled by 2014 Ram Hemi/8sp
Posts: 18,064
Why not leave the electric on in the water heater, it should cycle on/off as needed. Throw the o/s switch once and leave it on.
__________________
Jim
Never in doubt, often wrong.....
cpaharley2008 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2018, 11:34 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: North Van., British Columbia
Trailer: 2014 Escape 19
Posts: 4,428
Or turn the circuit breaker off. I know, you shouldn't use a circuit breaker as a switch but a few uses isn't going to kill it.

Ron
Ron in BC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2018, 11:47 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
sclifrickson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Port Townsend, Washington
Trailer: 2010 17B “MATT”, then 2017 19 “Lilly”
Posts: 1,199
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpaharley2008 View Post
Why not leave the electric on in the water heater, it should cycle on/off as needed. Throw the o/s switch once and leave it on.


I’m with Jim. Why not just leave it on? You’re only burning electricity. Which presumably is not metered, even though leaving it on full time wouldn’t actually use much. Alternatively, adding an interior electrical switch would be just as easy as adding all the plumbing that you’re proposing.

Others and myself could walk you through adding an electric switch if you’re interested.IMG_0309.jpg
__________________
There is no such thing as political correctness. Just correctness.
sclifrickson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2018, 01:00 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
rubicon327's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Burlington Twp., New Jersey
Trailer: 2010 Escape 19
Posts: 2,941
Yes, maybe just leave it on electric while you are there for the weekend and then throw the bypass valves and drain while you are away. Maybe a combination anode / drain would make it more convenient for you? Obviously you would have to trim your skirting or otherwise create an opening to access the water heater on the exterior.

https://www.amazon.com/NW-Leisure-TS...73279860&psc=1
__________________
“One way to get the most out of life is to look upon it as an adventure.”― W.F.
rubicon327 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2018, 01:52 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
sclifrickson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Port Townsend, Washington
Trailer: 2010 17B “MATT”, then 2017 19 “Lilly”
Posts: 1,199
Elisabeth, I take it that you leave the space heaters on during the week while you’re away, no? Otherwise your whole plumbing system would be in danger of freezing, not just your water heater, which you bypassed to avoid it freezing, right? If all this is true, then I’m back to just leaving the water heater on (electric) all the time. It won’t freeze, won’t use nearly as much juice as your space heaters, and is probably a lot safer than leaving space heaters unattended.

Another aspect of this, do you have tank heating pads to keep your fresh tank from freezing?
__________________

__________________
There is no such thing as political correctness. Just correctness.
sclifrickson is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off






» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by Escape Trailer Industries or any of its affiliates. This is an independent, unofficial site.



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:50 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2012 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.