Jacking point for wheel change - Page 2 - Escape Trailer Owners Community

Go Back   Escape Trailer Owners Community > Escape Tech > Problem Solving | Owners helping each other
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-04-2015, 09:51 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
LarryandLiz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Maple Ridge, BC, British Columbia
Trailer: 2014 17B;2012 Nissan Frontier SV 4
Posts: 569
Quote:
Originally Posted by reace View Post
Hi Gabe

I believe it is not recommended to jack on the axle because some jacks have a small head on them that may bend the tube, which houses the inner torsion arm.

You can jack on frame on either side of the axle, depending on how high your jack is. There is also the axle plate that is 1/4" plate steel that protrudes on the back side of the axle if your jack will work on it.

Reace
I'm revitalizing this old thread to ask my mechanically minded Forum members advice about the equipment necessary to safely change a flat on our 17b (should we ever need to do so). I've quoted Reace's 2009 response to Gabe's question (which was similar to mine). I'll check with ETI to ensure Reace's comments remain valid for our 2014 17b.

As possible jacking sites Reace points to two possible areas. A) the 1/4" steel axle plate on the back side of the axle plate. B) the frame on either side of the axle. I've taken pictures of the underside of our 17b to provide visuals of this area. I'll try to upload them.

We have BCAA with RV coverage but I am considering being in a place without cell coverage. I have access to the following gear (via my certified mechanic son-in-law).
The jack has a 2000 pound limit. 2 stands.

My questions. 1) Should I go out a buy a jack with a higher pound rating? 2) It seems like the axle plate should be where I place the jack head - agree? 3) Are people placing jack stands in case the jack fails? Where?

I'd appreciate any comments. Thanks, Larry
Attached Images
File Type: jpg image.jpg (270.7 KB, 44 views)
__________________

LarryandLiz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2015, 09:56 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
LarryandLiz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Maple Ridge, BC, British Columbia
Trailer: 2014 17B;2012 Nissan Frontier SV 4
Posts: 569
Here are some more pics
Attached Images
File Type: jpg image.jpg (181.2 KB, 39 views)
__________________

LarryandLiz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2015, 09:56 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
LarryandLiz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Maple Ridge, BC, British Columbia
Trailer: 2014 17B;2012 Nissan Frontier SV 4
Posts: 569
And one more
Attached Images
File Type: jpg image.jpg (242.3 KB, 46 views)
LarryandLiz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2015, 10:11 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: North Van., British Columbia
Trailer: 2014 Escape 19
Posts: 3,290
Personally, I wouldn't hesitate to use the gear you have. Maybe I was scarred for life by graphic training videos when I was young but one of the few absolute rules that I have is to never take a wheel off without secondary support.

If I'm in a situation without jack stands then I put the spare under the vehicle first, remove the problem tire and put it under the vehicle before putting the spare on. Not quite as good as jack stands but adds a margin of safety.

Ron
Ron in BC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2015, 11:50 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Trailer: 1979 Boler B1700
Posts: 9,052
Quote:
Originally Posted by LarryandLiz View Post
As possible jacking sites Reace points to two possible areas. A) the 1/4" steel axle plate on the back side of the axle plate. B) the frame on either side of the axle.
...
2) It seems like the axle plate should be where I place the jack head - agree?
I like that location structurally, and it seems least likely to slip there, but it can be hard to reach - with the jack in that far, the handle might be obstructed from pumping a full stroke.

If I were jacking on the frame, I would jack behind the axle - that way, when the trailer is lifted it shifts more load onto the tongue jack (not less), which is better for stability.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LarryandLiz View Post
The jack has a 2000 pound limit. 2 stands.

My questions. 1) Should I go out a buy a jack with a higher pound rating?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron in BC View Post
Personally, I wouldn't hesitate to use the gear you have.
I agree - 2000 pounds is comfortably more than either side of the axle supports (in the case of an Escape 17')

Quote:
Originally Posted by LarryandLiz View Post
3) Are people placing jack stands in case the jack fails? Where?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron in BC View Post
Maybe I was scarred for life by graphic training videos when I was young but one of the few absolute rules that I have is to never take a wheel off without secondary support.
Ron has a sound approach, but when changing a tire you don't need to put any part of your body under the trailer, so it seems reasonable to change the tire carefully without a jack stand. My biggest concern would be that the jack may not be as securely located under the trailer as a motor vehicle's tire changing jack is, so the risk off slipping off is higher.
Brian B-P is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2015, 12:03 AM   #16
Senior Member
 
dfandrews's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Ventura County, California
Trailer: 2015 Escape 17A - "The Pullman"
Posts: 1,342
Possibly the biggest hazard relative to jack slippage is if you're changing a tire beside the road. Passing trucks Will blow your trailer sideways, so if you can, get well away from the driving lanes, or better yet, drag it off the highway.
__________________
Don & Teresa
2015 17A: 2011 Honda Pilot
RLTW
dfandrews is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2015, 01:38 AM   #17
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: North Van., British Columbia
Trailer: 2014 Escape 19
Posts: 3,290
The reason I don't distinguish between using jack stands etc. when changing a tire and working under the vehicle is because, on occasion, the tire is hard to remove. Sometimes I've had to bend forward while whacking it etc. Also, if it does slip off the jack with the wheel off and no support, the trailer frame ends up close or on the ground making it more difficult to get a jack back in.

Maybe I'm overcautious but I've being supporting the vehicle when removing a wheel for so long I do it automatically.

Ron
Ron in BC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2015, 01:42 AM   #18
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Trailer: 1979 Boler B1700
Posts: 9,052
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron in BC View Post
The reason I don't distinguish between using jack stands etc. when changing a tire and working under the vehicle is because, on occasion, the tire is hard to remove. Sometimes I've had to bend forward while whacking it etc. Also, if it does slip off the jack with the wheel off and no support, the trailer frame ends up close or on the ground making it more difficult to get a jack back in.

Maybe I'm overcautious but I've being supporting the vehicle when removing a wheel for so long I do it automatically.

Ron
All good reasoning and sound practice
Brian B-P is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2015, 09:17 AM   #19
Senior Member
 
LarryandLiz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Maple Ridge, BC, British Columbia
Trailer: 2014 17B;2012 Nissan Frontier SV 4
Posts: 569
Thanks for these responses. I think we will experiment at home with a tire change before our next trip. I think I've seen threads about the amount of "torque" necessary for tightening lug nuts - one more thing to read up on. When we first got our Escape I didn't even think about flat tires.

I'm wondering if most of us forum members travel with the equipment necessary for a tire change. Like I wrote earlier I have BCAA with RV coverage but think that being prepared is a good way to travel.

- trailer should be connected to the tow for stability right? I read a passing comment in one of my web searches. And of course block the other wheel.

Larry
LarryandLiz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2015, 12:14 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: North Van., British Columbia
Trailer: 2014 Escape 19
Posts: 3,290
Yes, practice is always good. Better to learn when not under pressure to get it done. As much as I like my full BCAA coverage, being able to change the tire yourself is good because you don't always have cell phone coverage.

Under normal conditions, If the trailer is attached to the tug blocking the other wheel isn't really necessary presuming your tug's secure with its' parking brake.

Don't worry about torque. I'm not saying you don't have to, I'm saying if you have to change a tire and don't have a torque wrench, don't worry about it. The specified torque works out to be about what a person of average build, pushing as hard as they can (by hand, not using a foot) on the wheel wrench. I've checked my "by hand" torque with a torque wrench and it's usually so close I just leave it. That's my experience anyway, others might be horrified at my downplaying using a torque wrench.

Ron
__________________

Ron in BC is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off






» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:04 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2012 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.