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papasm2 04-19-2015 01:15 AM

Towing With Toyota 4Runner
 
I have an Escape 19, and my tow vehicle is a 2010 Toyota 4Runner, Trail Edition. I was wondering if there are other people towing with a 4Runner. I'm starting to have some concerns about a strain on my transmission. Would I be better served by having a transmission cooler installed? Also, the vehicle does struggle a bit on hills.
Any thoughts, or experience with my trailer and tow vehicle combination.

OneOleMan 04-19-2015 06:47 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Your 19 in well within the towing limits of your 4Runner and I think you’re wise to consider adding a transmission cooler. Before towing my 17B I added one plus a ScanGauge so I can see the transmission temperatures and not rely on the idiot light. When it comes to hills I’m more concerned about the transmission temperatures than speed so if the temperature starts climbing too much I back off the throttle and drop to a lower gear. And unless on flat ground, which is seldom in our neck of the woods, the overdrive is locked out, (transmission in the “S” mode).

It’s normally recommended you don’t use your cruise control when towing; well, I do until the transmission starts searching for a gear then it’s disengaged and I’ll either back off the throttle or manually drop to a lower gear, again watching the transmission temperatures.

In the picture the 3 temperatures ScanGauge is showing are the Transmission Pan Temp, and Torque Converter Temp and the engine Water Temp.

Leisure Lee 04-19-2015 06:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by papasm2 (Post 90231)
I have an Escape 19, and my tow vehicle is a 2010 Toyota 4Runner, Trail Edition. I was wondering if there are other people towing with a 4Runner. I'm starting to have some concerns about a strain on my transmission. Would I be better served by having a transmission cooler installed? Also, the vehicle does struggle a bit on hills.
Any thoughts, or experience with my trailer and tow vehicle combination.

Hi Papasm2: I have a 2010 Toyota 4Runner and tow the 19 and have had the same questions you are wondering about. There is some good information at this thread Towing an Escape 21: 4Runner or Tacoma? on this forum.
I can advise that the 4Runner has a transmission cooler as part of the tow package, at least in Canada. My own experience is that I initially wasn't sure there was sufficient power, especially on hills. Others on this forum have pointed out that when not towing, these vehicles in overdrive are only running at around 1800- 2000 rpm, but develop much more power at higher revs. So it is important to lock out your overdrive, so that your transmission isn't switching as often, and not be concerned about higher engine revs- and reduced gas mileage. Several on this forum have suggested transmission fluid temperature gauges to give you accurate feedback on transmission fluid temperatures. I asked the Service manager at the dealership where I get service, about adding a gauge. He indicated it would give you peace of mind, but felt that the vehicle was designed to tow, and wasn't convinced it was necessary. He did recommend changing transmission fluid more frequently when towing, and as others on this forum have suggested, consider switching to synthetic transmission fluid which withstands higher temperatures without breaking down.
I think you will find the above thread to have lots of good information.

Jim

Catchlight 04-19-2015 09:39 AM

If I were towing an Escape 19, I would likely still be using my 2011 4Runner Trail Edition. The extra 500 pounds of weight that our Escape 21 entails means the choice is not as simple. After a 4-week trip last fall, much of it in the Rockies, we traded the 4Runner for a 2012 Tundra, which is a lot more comfortable towing the 21.

The mountain passes on multi-laned Interstates and highways with frequent passing lanes should not be a problem for the 4Runner with a 19-foot Escape in tow. A transmission cooler, if one is not already installed, a Scangauge, and switching to synthetic transmission fluid would all help keep temperatures lower, and your peace of mind higher.

The 4Runner's "S-mode" transmission means you can control the shift points optimally when heading up or down a mountain pass, and can keep it out of 5th. Cruise control is best avoided.

Bill and Earline 04-19-2015 10:20 AM

I tow our 21' with a V-6 4Runner. I installed an external transmission cooler and use a Scanguage II. I echo what the others have said about adequate power and using cruise. My recommendation would be to start with the Scanguage. If trans temps are ok, you wouldn't need to add a cooler. Now, what are maximum allowable temps. When I contacted Valvoline (whose synthetic fluid I use from Walmart) the tech said not to exceed 230F for more than a few minutes--the fluid could take it, but transmission components would not.

fudge_brownie 04-19-2015 03:52 PM

Gee, some good advice here. The last group of members mentioned installing a ScanGauge before doing anything else. That is an excellent recommendation. Once installed and in monitoring mode, you have a definitive answer to the need for any further modifications to your TV. Now you are testing everything under your driving conditions and not someone else's style. Plus, I think it is an excellent product to have no matter what.

I would not worry about a vehicle struggling a bit on hills, if you can maintain the same speed as trucks on long hills you are doing well.

papasm2 04-19-2015 05:28 PM

Thanks to all for the great suggestions and advise. I was on the verge of buying Tundra. I'm not sure if my 4Runner has a transmission cooler, but I will most definitely check that out. I will also take the advise of switching to synthetic transmission fluid. Thanks again for the help.
Isn't this site great?

T&R 04-25-2015 10:09 AM

Your 1GR-FE dual overhead cam 4.0 V6 makes peak torque (278 ft-lbs.) @ 4400 rpm (according to Edmunds). It's OK to wind it up. Don't feel like you should be able to climb hills at 2k rpm in 5th gear. As others have said put it in Sport (manual) mode and shift down when climbing a grade. Also turning off the air conditioning on a major grade is not a bad idea either.

Wear and tear on the transmission is a valid concern and also as others have suggested monitoring trans temp is likely the best (and only?) way to monitor how hard it's working. A temp gauge will tell you if you need to add supplemental transmission cooling.

papasm2 04-25-2015 07:10 PM

Thanks T&R. I'm trying to get some information on which Transmission cooler to get for my TV.
As for the gauge to monitor the temp, I have looked at the Scan gauge on Amazon. It seems to do more than just monitor the Transmission temp, unless I was looking at the wrong thing.

I thought about buying the cooler on line, and having a local mechanic install for me.

On a scale of 1-10 on mechanical aptitude, I'm a minus 5. So some one else will have to do the install for me.

OneOleMan 04-25-2015 10:30 PM

The one you’d want is the ScanGauge II which does monitor many engine functions; coolant temperature, tranny temperatures, RPM, Volts from the alternator, horsepower currently being used and on and on.

So far as the tranny cooler goes letting a good mechanic buy and install one probably wouldn't cost any more than if you brought your own to him. His labor won’t be cheap but at least you can feel comfortable it was installed correctly.

Rossue 04-25-2015 11:08 PM

Arrived home today from 2 weeks going up Eastern Slope of Sierra then up to S. Lake Tahoe then Quincy. 1400 miles and every time I see a Highlander I both miss it to some degree then am thankful I traded to a full size. Not even close if you're doing any distance and climbing any significant mountain passes. Also really appreciated the aggressive engine braking while descending. Heck, I had to stop 3/4 up Monitor Pass for a cooldown as the trans temp gauge was reading 215 and it was only 55 outside temp. Left it running for about ten minutes to get down below 200F.

Trust your instincts; if it sounds too good....

padlin 04-25-2015 11:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by papasm2 (Post 90823)
Thanks T&R. I'm trying to get some information on which Transmission cooler to get for my TV.
As for the gauge to monitor the temp, I have looked at the Scan gauge on Amazon. It seems to do more than just monitor the Transmission temp, unless I was looking at the wrong thing.

I thought about buying the cooler on line, and having a local mechanic install for me.

On a scale of 1-10 on mechanical aptitude, I'm a minus 5. So some one else will have to do the install for me.

I had added one to my old GMC pickup, an easy job but if I were to need one again I'd go for a powered cooler as opposed to the passive ones that rely on the wind.

Something along these lines. Amazon.com: Derale 15800 Electra-Cool Remote Cooler: Automotive

fudge_brownie 04-26-2015 08:35 AM

There is an alternative to the Scan Gauge II and it is quite a bit less expensive. It is called the Ultra Gauge and only available through the manufacturer. They just recently added transmission temperature monitoring to their unit. With any unit it is important to check that they can properly measure tranny temps. Like anything there are some exceptions, with the older the TV, the more likely their to be issues. Usually your car model will have a forum devoted to those aficionados who do mods on cars like Escape owners do on trailers. Just Googling the model with transmission temperature monitoring may work or each of these models mentioned above have web sites with rather lame tables of comparability.

papasm2 04-27-2015 09:44 AM

Good advice. At the moment I am housebound due to a recent surgery. Soon as I am recovered I will try to find a good mechanic and have him install the cooler as well as the scan gauge.

Dave & Penny Smith 04-29-2015 08:31 AM

Folks:
While this thread has focused on the need for transmission coolers and gauges for monitoring transmission fluid temperatures, I have some additional questions about towing with a 4Runner. I have a 2008 V6 and have placed an order for a 17B. My owner's manual indicates max. towing weight of 5,000 lb., with 500 tongue wt. The 17B is well within these limits. My question has to do with the need for a WDH. My owner's manual calls the factory installed receiver hitch that came with the vehicle a "Weight Carrying Hitch" and states that WDH cannot be used with the receiver hitch that came on my 4Runner. Thus, it appears that if I will need a WDH to tow the 17B, I'll need to replace the receiver hitch. What experience do people have with the need for WDH for 17Bs? Another issue is the need for a "sway control device". Toyota says that this is required if the trailer weighs over 2,000 lb.--which the 17B clearly does. What information have folks found regarding these questions? Thanks for your help.
Dave

Bill and Earline 04-29-2015 09:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dave & Penny Smith (Post 91100)
Folks:
While this thread has focused on the need for transmission coolers and gauges for monitoring transmission fluid temperatures, I have some additional questions about towing with a 4Runner. I have a 2008 V6 and have placed an order for a 17B. My owner's manual indicates max. towing weight of 5,000 lb., with 500 tongue wt. The 17B is well within these limits. My question has to do with the need for a WDH. My owner's manual calls the factory installed receiver hitch that came with the vehicle a "Weight Carrying Hitch" and states that WDH cannot be used with the receiver hitch that came on my 4Runner. Thus, it appears that if I will need a WDH to tow the 17B, I'll need to replace the receiver hitch. What experience do people have with the need for WDH for 17Bs? Another issue is the need for a "sway control device". Toyota says that this is required if the trailer weighs over 2,000 lb.--which the 17B clearly does. What information have folks found regarding these questions? Thanks for your help.
Dave

Dave,
I did some studying on Toyota's "weight carrying hitch" then took mine off and replaced it with an aftermarket hitch for our 21'. The WCH appears to be fully capable for downward forces, but was bolted only to a rear cross-member, not the frame rails. The bolts used appeared very strong but were concentrated in an area about 4 by 5 inches. The receiver I installed also bolts to the same rear cross member and also to each of the frame rails. According to my Toyota owner's manual, this more complete receiver design allows a higher tow rating, and more importantly allows a weight distributing hitch, which is what I was after. My guess is the Toyota engineers thought a WDH would put too much strain on the what is essentially the single mounting point of the WCH.

My 4Runner has very little squat from the trailer, with or without the WDH, so I'd get info from other 4Runner owners on the need for the WDH at all with their 17s. I just thought I could help out with the definition and description of the factory Toyota receiver. I ended up with the Andersen hitch which also serves as sway control. Other less expensive sway controls are available, including one ETI sells and installs. I didn't know whether I needed one. With the weight of the 21', I just did everything to try to be safe. I might not have gotten the Andersen or the new receiver with a 17.
Bill

fudge_brownie 04-29-2015 09:45 AM

My experience with the 4Runner and an Escape 19 was very positive, this being without a WDH. I never had a loss of control or felt any sway. That said, the 19 is a different animal than the 17, dual axle being a dramatic difference. I am sure the tracking on the 19 is better due to four feet on the ground versus two.

My opinion is to try it without any modification. Then if you felt there was a sway issue add the anti sway or if the vehicle sagged a great deal go with a WDH. My point is not to over plan the issue. It is a great tow vehicle and I believe it can handle what you are purchasing without modification. However, if it gives you peace of mind you need to follow those instincts.

soultrek 04-29-2015 10:00 AM

I have towed our 17B with a 98 4runner V6 for two years, and a 2011 the past year - without WDH or sway control. I never experienced a sway problem with either; the trailer is stable and tracks well. The back end drops slightly with the tongue load (less on the 2011), and I have noticed some increased front tire feathering that I suspect is a result of changing-weight-distribution effect on toe-in.

Dave & Penny Smith 04-29-2015 10:12 AM

Thanks! This was exactly the sort of information the I was looking for.
Dave

gbaglo 04-29-2015 10:32 AM

I'm still trying to get Toyota to explain the statement about WDH in the manual for my RAV4 ( which is unibody, not frame ). It's been several years, with emails to Toyota and discussions with my dealership.
It appears that they are investigating my complaint that they won't give me an answer. Would be a lot easier if they would just give me the answer:

Dear Mr. Baglo:

Thank you for your most recent correspondence.

Your file, bearing case number (xxxxx) , is being sent to our Review team and pending the outcome of our review with your dealership, you may expect a call back from a member of our Review Team.

We would like to thank you again for taking the time to write.

GerriJ 04-29-2015 11:18 AM

The review team is trying to make sure you are not setting them up for a warranty issue.

Mark

Ian G 04-29-2015 11:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bill and Earline (Post 91105)
Dave,
I did some studying on Toyota's "weight carrying hitch" then took mine off and replaced it with an aftermarket hitch for our 21'. The WCH appears to be fully capable for downward forces, but was bolted only to a rear cross-member, not the frame rails. The bolts used appeared very strong but were concentrated in an area about 4 by 5 inches. The receiver I installed also bolts to the same rear cross member and also to each of the frame rails. According to my Toyota owner's manual, this more complete receiver design allows a higher tow rating, and more importantly allows a weight distributing hitch, which is what I was after. My guess is the Toyota engineers thought a WDH would put too much strain on the what is essentially the single mounting point of the WCH.

My 4Runner has very little squat from the trailer, with or without the WDH, so I'd get info from other 4Runner owners on the need for the WDH at all with their 17s. I just thought I could help out with the definition and description of the factory Toyota receiver. I ended up with the Andersen hitch which also serves as sway control. Other less expensive sway controls are available, including one ETI sells and installs. I didn't know whether I needed one. With the weight of the 21', I just did everything to try to be safe. I might not have gotten the Andersen or the new receiver with a 17.
Bill

I did exactly the same as Bill. The V8 4Runner uses a hitch similar to the aftermarket ones that are attached to the side frame rails these direct the load to that main frame structure, The V6 uses more of a hitch block that is attached to the rear crossmember, this relys on the integrity of that crossmember which is probably not designed for the twisting loads experienced by a WDH.

So I also installed the aftermarket hitch and it worked flawlessly with similar comments that Bill made

gbaglo 04-29-2015 12:09 PM

BTW, my Hidden Hitch receiver ( class III for WDH ) was installed at the dealership prior to me taking possession.

Brian B-P 04-29-2015 05:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dave & Penny Smith (Post 91100)
My owner's manual calls the factory installed receiver hitch that came with the vehicle a "Weight Carrying Hitch" and states that WDH cannot be used with the receiver hitch that came on my 4Runner. Thus, it appears that if I will need a WDH to tow the 17B, I'll need to replace the receiver hitch. What experience do people have with the need for WDH for 17Bs?

Right... replace only if you need WDH. I think you're on the right track asking about experience; you could also look at why a WDH would be used, and if that reason applies to you. The primary purpose of a WDH is to reduce load on the tug's rear axle, and if that's not excessively loaded with the desired trailer's tongue weight, then you may not have any need for WDH.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dave & Penny Smith (Post 91100)
Another issue is the need for a "sway control device". Toyota says that this is required if the trailer weighs over 2,000 lb.--which the 17B clearly does. What information have folks found regarding these questions?

My 2004 Sienna manual stated the same requirement, and when I asked Toyota Canada for clarification, they said that the sway control requirement was no longer applicable. I don't use any sway control device with my 3000 pound trailer.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bill and Earline (Post 91105)
I did some studying on Toyota's "weight carrying hitch" then took mine off and replaced it with an aftermarket hitch for our 21'. The WCH appears to be fully capable for downward forces, but was bolted only to a rear cross-member, not the frame rails. The bolts used appeared very strong but were concentrated in an area about 4 by 5 inches. The receiver I installed also bolts to the same rear cross member and also to each of the frame rails. According to my Toyota owner's manual, this more complete receiver design allows a higher tow rating, and more importantly allows a weight distributing hitch, which is what I was after. My guess is the Toyota engineers thought a WDH would put too much strain on the what is essentially the single mounting point of the WCH.

Excellent info, and makes perfect sense.

In general, Toyota practice - at least as of a couple years ago:
  • cars: no provision for hitch
  • unibody SUVs and van: planned mounting points in unibody
  • body-on-frame SUVs: base hitch mounts to rearmost crossmember of frame << 4Runner
  • trucks: hitch is part of bumper structure or separate part integrated with bumper structure, bolted to frame rails in either case

Quote:

Originally Posted by gbaglo (Post 91125)
BTW, my Hidden Hitch receiver ( class III for WDH ) was installed at the dealership prior to me taking possession.

That's pretty normal. The OEM accessory hitch is dealer-installed, but dealers also offer aftermarket hitches (as part of the purchase package), either installed by the dealer or the dealer sends the vehicle out to a hitch shop for installation.

Ian G 04-29-2015 05:28 PM

To expand on my reply here are pictures of the original 4Runner hitch compared to the aftermarket, The last picture is the two hitches side by side.
http://www.proud-canadian.com/wp-con...86-640x481.jpg

http://www.proud-canadian.com/wp-con...90-640x481.jpg

http://www.proud-canadian.com/wp-con...89-640x481.jpg

Rossue 04-29-2015 06:29 PM

Your Hidden Hitch looks almost identical to the "OEM" hitch I bought from Toyota(included wiring harness) for $298 for my son's 2004 Highlander.

Brian B-P 04-29-2015 06:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ian G (Post 91167)
To expand on my reply here are pictures of the original 4Runner hitch compared to the aftermarket...

Thank Ian.
I think it's unfortunate - but not surprising - that the aftermarket hitch doesn't tie into the crossmember like the OEM hitch, in addition to extending to the frame.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rossue (Post 91171)
Your Hidden Hitch looks almost identical to the "OEM" hitch I bought from Toyota(included wiring harness) for $298 for my son's 2004 Highlander.

They all look pretty much the same, even between different hitch brands and different vehicle models. It may be that the OEM hitch is made by Cequent (the company whose brands include Hidden Hitch as well as Draw-Tite and Reese); my OEM Sienna hitch was made by Cequent.

Ian G 04-29-2015 07:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brian B-P (Post 91175)
Thank Ian.
I think it's unfortunate - but not surprising - that the aftermarket hitch doesn't tie into the crossmember like the OEM hitch, in addition to extending to the frame.

Brian you totally misunderstood my post, the aftermarket DOES NOT tie into the crossmember because that is NOT as structurally sound as the main frame rails. Looking at the design of the crossmember it will definitely handle a vertical load better that any rotational forces. The V6 OEM is only connected to the stamped steel crossmember is a much weaker connection. This is evident the V8 4Runner version which uses a design similar to the aftermarket, does have a WDH rating and has increased tow capacity.

Bill and Earline 04-29-2015 09:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ian G (Post 91179)
Brian you totally misunderstood my post, the aftermarket DOES NOT tie into the crossmember because that is NOT as structurally sound as the main frame rails. Looking at the design of the crossmember it will definitely handle a vertical load better that any rotational forces. The V6 OEM is only connected to the stamped steel crossmember is a much weaker connection. This is evident the V8 4Runner version which uses a design similar to the aftermarket, does have a WDH rating and has increased tow capacity.

You guys really had me double-checking all this. I installed a Hidden Hitch 70779 that appears the same as the one in Ian's photo. It uses three bolts into each of the frame rails and one toward each end into the cross member, just not in the center location as in the V-6 OEM weight carrying receiver. That's a total of 8 bolts in mine, now. I am pleased with mine, but again, not sure it's necessary for a 17. Hidden Hitch has installation manuals on their site, if anyone wants to take a look. I paid $153 delivered last August.

Dave&Kathie 04-30-2015 10:29 AM

It's very important to consider the year and model of 4 runners. That can make a huge difference. Our 06 V8 Ltd came with the WDH receiver which states on it that it will tow 7,000 lbs and carry 700 lbs hitch weight. With a weight distributing hitch the tongue weight goes up to 10,000. We also had a 05 V6 4runner with the WCH. We did use a WDH with built in sway control with the Casita on that vehicle (maybe we shouldn't have - we were newbies and Casita recommended it!). Toyota is very specific about their hitches and towing capacities - you don't need to call - just read the manual. They also state that your vehicle may be able to tow more with a different hitch properly installed. This is for 4runners only.

Be safe, have fun!
;) Kathie

Brian B-P 04-30-2015 04:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ian G (Post 91179)
Brian you totally misunderstood my post, the aftermarket DOES NOT tie into the crossmember because that is NOT as structurally sound as the main frame rails. Looking at the design of the crossmember it will definitely handle a vertical load better that any rotational forces. The V6 OEM is only connected to the stamped steel crossmember is a much weaker connection. This is evident the V8 4Runner version which uses a design similar to the aftermarket, does have a WDH rating and has increased tow capacity.

No, I understood it.
  • OEM for V6: attached only to crossmember, not strong enough for WD
  • aftermarket and OEM for V8: attached only to framerails, tube of receiver is stronger than crossmember

I think that it would be better if the aftermarket and V8 hitches had a connection to the crossmember (where the OEM V6 hitch box attaches) in addition to the structure it already has. The combination would be stronger... although obviously the aftermarket/V8 design is strong enough by itself for the rated towing capacity of the vehicle.

GRINGOandTICA 04-30-2015 04:37 PM

Who pulls stock with no mods but a trailer brake?

Brian B-P 04-30-2015 04:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bill and Earline (Post 91192)
It uses three bolts into each of the frame rails and one toward each end into the cross member...

Yep, exactly as I would expect from Ian's photo. For anyone who would like an illustration: Hidden Hitch 70779 installation instructions (note that this is also the Reese 44548 and
Draw-Tite 75155).

Also, I note that in the instructions that rear crossmember is called the "impact bar", because it is also the bumper structure.

Finally, the same hitch fits the Lexus GX470, because that's the Lexus-badged version of the same vehicle.

bdornbush 04-30-2015 05:22 PM

I found it curious that some models of Toyota and Honda are not to be used with WDH. I have had a Chrysler minivan and Jeep Grand Cherokee with factory tow packages, and for both, Chrysler states that with a certain weight of trailer, a WDH is required. I have used a WDH on several trailers and find the ride and the feeling that the TV and trailer are one unit to be great. No sway, no rocking of the trailer, and when I had a blowout on the trailer, no lack of control at Interstate speeds as I pulled to the shoulder. I know that not all agree, but I wouldn't tow without one, and would rule out the Toyota and Honda models that don't allow them.

gbaglo 04-30-2015 05:48 PM

1 Attachment(s)
I've been towing my 17B with a RAV4 and Hidden Hitch receiver and WDH for more than six years, without any issues. I've also spent six years trying to get Toyota to explain why they "don't recommend" a WDH. Don't recommend is not the same as instructions NOT to use a WDH.
Anyway, I still don't have an answer, although they apparently are investigating my complaint that they won't answer my question. My question is why don't they recommend a WDH?
Note that right above the paragraph on hitches, there is a warning about something else in yellow.
I know I'm harping, but I'm now like a dog with a bone.

Rossue 04-30-2015 06:46 PM

You'll probably never hear anything from them except corporate speak. Since the 2008 Highlander doesn't have that warning in the manual perhaps it has to do with the wheelbase of the RAV4(104.7").

If one reads How to Tow Safely I posted previously there is mention of how using a WDH with spring bars set too tight can be more dangerous than not having them at all.

http://www.slaga.net/RV/How%20to%20Tow-version%202.pdf

Brian B-P 04-30-2015 06:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rossue (Post 91273)
If one reads How to Tow Safely I posted previously ...

http://www.slaga.net/RV/How%20to%20Tow-version%202.pdf

Since the person who posted that material did not have the right to do so, the copyright owner requested that he remove the material (the whole "RV" folder). The link no longer works (at least for me).

Brian B-P 04-30-2015 06:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rossue (Post 91273)
Since the 2008 Highlander doesn't have that warning in the manual perhaps it has to do with the wheelbase of the RAV4(104.7").

If one reads How to Tow Safely I posted previously there is mention of how using a WDH with spring bars set too tight can be more dangerous than not having them at all.

I don't think any vintage of Highlander has had that warning.

I think you're on to a reasonable explanation. Although short-wheelbase vehicles often need WDH more than long ones (because they suffer more from adverse load transfer in reaction to hitch weight), they are also more vulnerable to over-application of WD.

Rossue 04-30-2015 07:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brian B-P (Post 91276)
Since the person who posted that material did not have the right to do so, the copyright owner requested that he remove the material. The link no longer works (at least for me).

Hadn't heard about any request to remove; was that previously mentioned here? Link still works for me.

Although somewhat dated sounding when reading- this guide is one of the most comprehensive I have seen anywhere and really gets into the safety aspect of towing.

gbaglo 04-30-2015 07:13 PM

I'd be happy if they said, "we just put that there to cover our #ss".
Anyway, can't mitigate an issue if you don't know what the issue is.


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