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-   -   Caulk inspection (http://www.escapeforum.org/forums/f12/caulk-inspection-6778.html)

gbaglo 11-16-2015 07:34 PM

Caulk inspection
 
Been on the forum for the full seven years and I can't recall any discussion about checking caulking, etc. for potential leaks.
If caulk were actually missing, I guess I could tell, but if it's lifted off the surface by some minute amount, I probably wouldn't. And I'm afraid to poke and prod for fear of causing a leak.
Anybody capable of creating a tutorial on the subject? :flowers:

Bobbito 11-16-2015 09:30 PM

Yes, Glen, I would love to see a good tutorial (maybe video) on this. After our first major damage to our 2002 Nash from 2 leaks and resulting in a $6800 repair bill in 2007, I expected that with new caulking applied by professionals it should be good for a few years. However, in 2012 I proactively removed the old caulking as best I could, cleaned up the seam areas and applied a good bead of the appropriate caulking (Proflex for sides; self leveling caulking on roof) The repair shop cautioned against using silicone. I applied a very thick bead, opting for safety rather than looks.

Despite this effort, in 2014 I was again faced with a major leak that was going to cost $5000 to repair. I could not believe it after all my efforts! Even the Google maps street view of our home showed me maintaining the trailer seams. Well, the owner of Adventure RV Repair (in Chilliwack) told me that looking at a joint was NOT adequate. He said that very inch of sealant or caulking needs to be pulled back with your fingers to ensure it is still adhering to the siding or rubber roof material.

My brother-in-law, with a similar stick trailer major leak damage experience, was told that he should have checked every seam every 6 months. Now checking my Escapeís roof seams without putting my weight on the roof is really going to be a challenge. I would appreciate advice on this.

Of course this is what drove me to look for a molded fiberglass trailer. Still, even though the seams on the Escape arenít subjected to stress like on the stick trailers, there is potential for leaking if not properly maintained.

I would like to hear ETIís and other molded fiberglass trailer manufacturersí advice on this, including the recommended caulking/sealant. I want my Escape to go the distance.

Bob K

Fox hunt 11-17-2015 02:38 AM

I have no idea about how or where I should be checking caulking. But so far this month buckets of water coming down. No leaks so far!

padlin 11-17-2015 05:39 AM

Looked the Escapes caulking over this summer at 1 year old, the only areas of concern were shrinking at the top of the upper rear lights, and what I'd call checking on the caulk they used upper side of the windows. Added more to the lights after being unsuccessful at removing them. Did nothing to the windows.

On my last trailer I'd find cracks or splits in the caulking and areas where it pulled away from one surface or the other, usually accompanied by green mold.

On Edit:
Found this Utube video, it shows the cracking I've run into on the old trailer and how to fix it. It's even on a fiberglass roof.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PzAjZbCEbLU

Donna D. 11-17-2015 06:37 AM

All the reading I've done over the years, the worst leaks happen when folks mix incompatible caulks. Often pull off silicone and slap something else on and wonder why in a short period of time leaks are back.


The best seems to be using the same appropriate caulk. Remove and thoroughly (I mean thoroughly) clean the area and then reseal. Folks seem to want to rush it. Like with painting... its all about the prep.

cpaharley2008 11-17-2015 06:51 AM

Yes, I agree with Donna, any caulking needs to have a clean surface. All the lights on the Escape have a clear coat of caulk on the top. Inspect and repair as needed. I also recommend removing and caulking the screws where needed. I had to remove my door and caulked the door screws which had -0- on them. The windows also have a clear coating of caulk along the tops.

skiman 11-17-2015 07:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Donna D. (Post 118447)
All the reading I've done over the years, the worst leaks happen when folks mix incompatible caulks. Often pull off silicone and slap something else on and wonder why in a short period of time leaks are back.


The best seems to be using the same appropriate caulk. Remove and thoroughly (I mean thoroughly) clean the area and then reseal. Folks seem to want to rush it. Like with painting... its all about the prep.

So what are the compatible caulks? Proflex? What about windows? Windows have two different materials?

MyronL 11-17-2015 08:47 AM

2 Attachment(s)
Let's go caulking!

J Mac 11-17-2015 09:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by skiman (Post 118449)
So what are the compatible caulks? Proflex? What about windows? Windows have two different materials?

Contact Escape Trailers and ask what caulk brand they use. If you get a brand name look up in the internet as to a comparable product. This is a maintenance issue that anybody can do. It's not that hard...time consuming but not hard.
YouTube has dozens of tips and hints.

thoer 11-17-2015 09:33 AM

ETI uses ProFlex unless that has changed very recently. Myron are all those photos from your trailer? That fan looks to be badly cracked and damaged.


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