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Old 01-18-2021, 04:32 AM   #41
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heh. my kid the Geologist is building himself a camper from a F550 utility truck. he wants to go supersingles and has some really wide 20" rims but is having trouble figuring out the right tire to use. the truck is supposed to have load 'G' tires, but I think he's figuring he can use "F" since he will be nowhere near the original GVWR. he's got the camper all aluminum box-framed out, this is work in progress...

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Old 01-18-2021, 08:14 AM   #42
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Build a heavy enough loaded camper on the rig permanently and it will ride like it's always loaded. But I'd still want an air ride. I want an air ride in a class 8 tractor even if I'm loaded to 105,000 pounds.


I drove an F-750 tractor around on an evaluation and it had a standard hard mounted seat, kicked like a mule.


I know your truck is just your tow rig, but most people need to double duty their tow rig with their commuter. One of the reasons I always wince at advice like "Buy a tow vehicle that can haul twice the weight of your trailer." or similar. Nobody really wants to drive around town all day in an unladen 1-ton.
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Old 01-18-2021, 08:58 AM   #43
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I think this comfort thing comes down to preference. I do drive my Ď98 Chevy 2500 unloaded all over town, and donít find it uncomfortable. Someone else might, but I leave with it on a 700 mile trip Friday to visit my parents, and donít see a comfort issue.
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Old 01-18-2021, 11:15 AM   #44
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I think this comfort thing comes down to preference. I do drive my Ď98 Chevy 2500 unloaded all over town, and donít find it uncomfortable. Someone else might, but I leave with it on a 700 mile trip Friday to visit my parents, and donít see a comfort issue.
Seems like that has to be a minority view. A lot of time and ink is spent in car reviews talking about things like handling and ride comfort. If the worst car ever made is like, 5 out of 10 on handling and ride comfort then every HD pickup is at best a 2.

HD pickups are built to carry and tow really heavy loads and they have really stiff springs to do it. They buck and kick at every bump.

For us, we first take the Mercedes C-class if anyone is going anywhere. The next vehicle down is my mid-size pickup which is acceptable but already noticeable much, much worse on ride comfort and handling.

A HD pickup is yet again another huge step down. Plus huge turning radius etc. etc

Here's one question.....you guys loving HD pickups driving on smooth roads? Here in Michigan a lot of roads look like they were recently shelled by an artillery division. An empty HD truck on the right Michigan road will beat you to death.
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Old 01-18-2021, 01:10 PM   #45
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I live on gravel; itís not too smooth. I donít feel like I have to drive 90 mph everywhere. Whatever the speed limit is, I drive it unless towing. Towing, I stay 5 mph under it and never tow above 60 mph. Could I, sure; would I, no. My next truck, if there is a next one, will not be an HD because I donít have a Bigfoot camper anymore, but I still find times when itís nice to be able to throw 4000lbs in the back.

As to the Ridgeline and an E19, personally, given the way I use a truck, I would want 1800 lbs minimum payload, and 7000 lbs towing. Of small trucks, only the Ranger is rated for that. Even many of the full size trucks no longer have that payload. When I tow, I tow weeks at a time, often daily, in mountains, off pavement, so for me, the Ridgelineís 5000 lbs rating is too low for my comfort. Depending on how you use it, it might be perfect for you. I too have an E19 on order. Obviously I donít care what it weighs given my TV.
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Old 01-18-2021, 01:20 PM   #46
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As to the Ridgeline and an E19, personally, given the way I use a truck, I would want 1800 lbs minimum payload, and 7000 lbs towing. Of small trucks, only the Ranger is rated for that.
The GM and Ford mid-size are about the same, You can only get up over 1700 pounds cargo if you select a 4x2. The 4x2 Ranger with the supercab (the little one) gets up over 1800 pounds as long as you do not select much else in options to add weight. The more typical 4x4 crew cab trucks are all closer to 1500 pounds cargo capacity.

They are both rated to tow 7000 to 7700 depending on engine and configuration.

IMO those two mid-size are about perfect for an E-19 and would be too loaded for me with an E-21.

Quote:
When I tow, I tow weeks at a time, often daily, in mountains, off pavement, so for me, the Ridgeline’s 5000 lbs rating is too low for my comfort. Depending on how you use it, it might be perfect for you. I too have an E19 on order. Obviously I don’t care what it weighs given my TV.
IMO a typical family will overload a Ridgeline or Tacoma most likely with an E-19 given cargo limits and adjustable 5000 pound tow limits plus altitude restrictions etc. Those two trucks are well suited to the E-17's.

I don't tell people to buy way more truck than they need, but I do also normally warn people to look at all the limitations and be realistic about how much stuff they will be carrying. That's how and why I see those above listed trucks as I do.

It's not enough to say "Ridgeline - 5000 pounds tow rating, Escape 19 <5000, good to go." You have to read the manual because there is GVWR, GCVWR, Altitude restrictions, and cargo allowances (in the case of Honda, especially).

A full-size pickup will pull any of the current Escape trailers if equipped at all reasonably.
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Old 01-18-2021, 01:42 PM   #47
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ĎThe GM and Ford mid-size are about the same, and unless you are looking at a very specific Ranger spec I don't think you can get one that will carry 1800 pounds. About 1500 is it for both the GM and Fords. ď.

There are Rangerís with 250-300lbs more payload rating than GMC, and if I personally bought one, I would look at those comboís. Iím not shopping though.

Most people put more options on a truck than I do. If I need a truck, I want payload and towing. Hence, while the Ridgeline is a nice vehicle, I would personally only tow 3500 lbs trailers with it, and it would never have enough payload for me.

I could see for many people the Ridgeline could work really well. If you are a weekend camper with a 19 or 21, and only go 50 miles to your local lake 10 times a year on relatively flat ground under 5000í altitude Iíd use a Ridgeline. If you have a 17, Iíd use a Ridgeline. But that is only my opinion.

For me it doesnít work, but I see many families who camp that way, and have lots of fun.

I think you have to evaluate your needs. We each often need different things.
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Old 01-18-2021, 01:48 PM   #48
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ĎThe GM and Ford mid-size are about the same, and unless you are looking at a very specific Ranger spec I don't think you can get one that will carry 1800 pounds. About 1500 is it for both the GM and Fords. ď.

There are Rangerís with 250-300lbs more payload rating than GMC, and if I personally bought one, I would look at those comboís. Iím not shopping though.
Yeah, I updated my post while you were responding, so I'll hit it again here.

The GM mid-size are all rated to 1490 - 1550 pounds for all configurations.

The Ford Rangers are rated around 1560 for 4x4 configurations.

Where I live and what I do, a 4x4 is a requirement, so in my mind all Rangers and GM mid-size = about 1500 pounds.

You are correct, if you get a 4x2 crew cab Ranger the cargo capacity is about 1700 pounds, and if you get a 4x2 extended cab Ranger the capacity is > 1800 pounds. I literally cannot get up my own driveway with a 4x2 so I had put that out of my mind.
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Old 01-18-2021, 02:28 PM   #49
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I bought my Ď98 Chevy 2500 2wd in Alaska and drove it there year round until moving to KS in 2012. I still drive it year round, although I no longer buy winter tires and put weight in the back. Iíve just never needed 4wd. It can be helpful, but Iíve never needed it. The last 10 years in Alaska, I lived in Ketchikan, and sometimes it would get very icy and I had to park on the street because I couldnít get in the driveway. The ice only prevented that a couple of times, so not worth 4wd. The rest of the time, with patient driving, I could pull in.

My next truck, if there is one, will be 2wd, and I always get the smallest cab and biggest bed offered. I figure itís a truck, and if I need or want the car, I drive the car. Lotís of people donít feel that way anymore. I can see the advantages and disadvantages of larger cabs.
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Old 01-18-2021, 04:20 PM   #50
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We have a 2004 f150 4x2 extended cab, 5.4 it’s a great towing vehicle for the 21
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Old 01-18-2021, 10:31 PM   #51
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Originally Posted by John in Santa Cruz View Post
heh. my kid the Geologist is building himself a camper from a F550 utility truck. he wants to go supersingles and has some really wide 20" rims but is having trouble figuring out the right tire to use. the truck is supposed to have load 'G' tires, but I think he's figuring he can use "F" since he will be nowhere near the original GVWR. he's got the camper all aluminum box-framed out, this is work in progress...

Very cool! I have wondered if ETI will ever add campers to their product line. I hope you keep us posted on his progress.
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Old 01-18-2021, 10:42 PM   #52
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ETI sort of does, already

Aren't they a subsidiary of another company, that has made & sold fiberglass truck campers for many years?




A major and interesting truck camper project for your geo-son.
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Old 01-19-2021, 01:21 AM   #53
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Aren't they a subsidiary of another company, that has made & sold fiberglass truck campers for many years?




A major and interesting truck camper project for your geo-son.
You are correct Habberdabber. I'm from the old days of Reace and Tammy and forgot that Northern Lite is also under the corporate umbrella.
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Old 01-19-2021, 02:39 AM   #54
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Originally Posted by John in Santa Cruz View Post
heh. my kid the Geologist is building himself a camper from a F550 utility truck. he wants to go supersingles and has some really wide 20" rims but is having trouble figuring out the right tire to use. the truck is supposed to have load 'G' tires, but I think he's figuring he can use "F" since he will be nowhere near the original GVWR. he's got the camper all aluminum box-framed out, this is work in progress...
We're way off of Ridgelines towing Escape 19's here, but since it's interesting...

This looks like a home-built aluminum alternative to an EarthRoamer XV-LTS/LTI (EarthRoamers have a composite RV body), making good use of some of the service body components.

EarthRoamer uses Continental MPT81 tires in what they call the 41" tall size, which appears to be 335/80R20 (12.5 R20) - that size goes on 10" to 11" wide wheels. The other common brand and model for these on and off road "expedition campers" or "overlanders" of this size seems to be the Michelin XZL, although I don't think XZL's come in a size that "small". EarthRoamer uses them as single tires on the stock dual wheel rear axle, using super single wheels intended for the front of dually trucks and mounting them at the rear in the outboard position only, causing massively offset bearing loads and brakes comically hanging out in empty space (rather than set into the inner wheel). This stupidity seems to be assumed to acceptable based on using much less than the rear axle's full capacity, but those tires can handle almost the full 14,706 pound rear axle rating (at a bone-jarring 96 PSI)... hopefully the rig isn't that heavy in the rear.

The stock F-550 tires are 225/70R19.5... load range G, but the load range of the original tires is irrelevant once the tire size has been changed. The tires used just need to have adequate capacity, which means a lower load range can work in the front (because of the larger size), and who knows what is needed in the rear (bigger tires, but only one per side, and who knows what gross vehicle weight). Rational choice starts with knowing the axle loads (not GVWR).
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Old 01-19-2021, 01:52 PM   #55
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I had a ridgeline when I received delivery of my 21NE and towed it back to storage about 30 miles. Let me put it this way: I traded the ridgeline in and got a ram 1500 less than a month later.

I loved the ridgeline but it will labor heavily while towing.
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Old 01-19-2021, 06:18 PM   #56
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It's not enough to say "Ridgeline - 5000 pounds tow rating, Escape 19 <5000, good to go." You have to read the manual because there is GVWR, GCVWR, Altitude restrictions, and cargo allowances (in the case of Honda, especially).
The cargo allowance is just Honda's way to allow manage gross vehicle weight without actually weighing the vehicle and comparing that to GVWR and rear GAWR... but yes, it is important for everyone to realize that they are several factors to consider.

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A full-size pickup will pull any of the current Escape trailers if equipped at all reasonably.
Only because GCWR minus curb weight (the basic limit on trailer weight) is so much higher than the weight of any Escape, and because payload is so much more than tongue weight. However, payload is not so much above pin weight that any reasonable full-size pickup is actually suitable for a 5.0TA with significant passenger and cargo weight, and some people will even run into rear axle or GVWR concerns while towing a 21' or 23' if they they carry enough stuff in the truck. Perhaps "reasonably equipped" should mean "with the maximum payload package available".

All the same factors that apply to the Ridgeline apply to any other vehicle.
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Old 01-19-2021, 06:23 PM   #57
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I have wondered if ETI will ever add campers to their product line.
As already mentioned, slide-in truck campers are the job of another related company (Northern Lite); I hope Escape never makes Class C motorhomes (which is what John's kid is building), because that's a huge risk. The last time Bigfoot went bankrupt (they've gone under more than one) building motorhomes was a big part of their problem.
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Old 01-19-2021, 08:07 PM   #58
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Other high end trailer manufacturers, for example Travel Supreme, have gone under jumping on the motor home bandwagon.
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Old 01-20-2021, 12:58 AM   #59
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If I had a 17 I’d expect the Ridgeline would be adequate
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Old 02-02-2021, 11:04 AM   #60
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2) The Ridgeline GCVWR is just a bit under 10,000 pounds. BUT, the vehicle loses 2% off that GCVWR for every 1000 feet elevation above sea level. What this means practically is that if you drag an E-19 over the continental divide on I-70, you will be violating the GCVWR, no doubt.
That assumes the GCVWR is restricted because of engine horsepower and not some other factor like brakes or transmission.
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