How do you camp? Boondocking or campgrounds? - Escape Trailer Owners Community

Go Back   Escape Trailer Owners Community > Escape Me | General Topics > General Escape
Click Here to Login
Register Files FAQ Community Calendar Today's Posts Search Log in
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 04-20-2020, 08:35 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
UncleTim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Location: Boulder, Colorado
Trailer: 2020 Escape 5.0TA "Zen"
Posts: 357
How do you camp? Boondocking or campgrounds?

I have heard a lot of people describe their camping experiences. There are a lot of different ways to camp it seems.

I have talked to people that thought they were going to boondock more than they actually ended up doing that. Those folks are in need of a constant Internet connection so that drives them to campgrounds. That and shower facilities.

Then I read in another post from Jim Bennett (post #14 at this link) that most of his camping is boondocking. I wonder if this is just personal choice or easier in some parts of the country than others.

https://www.escapeforum.org/forums/f...xle-17565.html

How do you guys camp? Since I came from backpacking, everything is boondocking (in a sense).

When you boondock do you generally feel safe through the night? Is it solitary or are there other campers around?

Our trailer should be ready for pickup in about 25 days. I hope we are!
__________________

UncleTim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2020, 09:28 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
davidmurphy02's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: Austin, Texas
Trailer: 2019 5.0TA "Junior", 2019 Ram 1500 5.7 Hemi
Posts: 860
Our previous trailer, which we had for 15 years, was not very well equipped for boondocking so we tended to find campgrounds with hookups much of the time and did very limited boondocking. We are not big fans of most commercial RV parks, prefer state parks and national park campgrounds.

With our Escape we have found that with the solar capability we can go without hookups easily for extended periods and now we camp primarily without hookups, mainly to be in more remote and quiet settings. Most national parks do not have any hookups but generally have wonderful campgrounds. It's easy enough to add fresh water to the tank from a six gallon container and most campgrounds have at least a few water spigots, so other than a dump station once in a while we are pretty self contained and independent.
__________________

__________________
David, Mary, and 3 Cats
davidmurphy02 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2020, 09:30 AM   #3
Site Team
 
cpaharley2008's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Central, Pennsylvania
Trailer: Escape#4, 2019 Escape21 DejaView pulled by 2014 Ram Hemi/8sp
Posts: 21,959
I think it depends on where you live and camp. Canada is about the same size of US in land area but only has the population of California, spread out. Thus up north a lot of open spaces. Down here in the lower 48 the eastern side of the Mississippi is very congested, the open west is more sparsely populated until you cross the Sierras. Thus open space boon docking is hard to come by on this side of the river. In addition depending on weather, cold winter weather means electric hookups, warm sunny weather means boon docking. Thus where you live and camp and the weather plays on how you camp.
If I'm going to stop for the night and pay a fee, I'd expect electric and water and clean restrooms. Also the availability of food nearby so that less time is needed to prepare a meal. Dog exercise areas is also important. There is a steak restaurant in Amarillo, Texas https://www.bigtexan.com where we have stopped several times on our cross-country treks. The cg is called "Overnight" and you can only stay one night. Each spot has electric/water and a fenced in pet area where you can leave your dogs outside for awhile after being inside your tow vehicle for 12 hours. Nice showers also. When checking in you let them know you to go to the Big Texan. Around 5:30 a stretch limo, with huge horns on the hood, picks you up and others and takes everyone to the restaurant. This place is huge and so are the 72 oz steaks if you want one.
Anyway I have a couple of rattlesnake beers while ordering my dinners to go. The limo takes you back every hour. We eat inside, no kitchen mess, I have a little buzz on, the dogs get exercise and some steak scraps and Noelia gets a nice souvenir from the gift shop. Everyone is a happy camper. Next day, Flagstaff, Az.
__________________
Jim
Due to the pandemic, my life now exists of only 3 days, yesterday, today, and tomorrow. Everything else has been forgotten!
cpaharley2008 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2020, 10:00 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
kstock11's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Asheville, North Carolina
Trailer: 2014 Escape 19
Posts: 818
A lot of my camping is with hookups because I travel with a friend (who has an Aliner). He and his rig are not as well suited to boon docking as my Escape. I really enjoy the freedom of being able to camp without hookups. The Great Smoky National Park has no hookups and I prefer the loops without generators. When traveling it seems a waste to pay $40 for a campsite when you are dependent on finding a campground at the right location. (I prefer traveling 300 miles per day) I do belong to Harvest Hosts and find they are a great resource for finding a campsite at the right distance when traveling from one point to another. Also they are preferable (to me) to a Walmart or casino.
__________________
Kevin
Thanks to the interstate highway system, it is now possible to travel across the country from coast to coast without seeing anything - Charles Kuralt
kstock11 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2020, 10:11 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
Vermilye's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Oswego, New York
Trailer: 2017 Escape 21, 2018 Ford F150
Posts: 3,809
Like many Escape owners, I do a mix. I tend to stay at state & national parks and a few commercial campgrounds when traveling. Most of the time it is with water & electric or dry camping.

The last 4 winters were spent at the LTVAs in Quartzsite AZ & Imperial Dam, CA. Dry camping in the desert where you pick your place - no actual campsites. The longest stretch of non hookup camping has been 91 days, while 70 - 75 days is the usual.

As to access to the internet, I generally have it through cell modems. On the last 162 day trip I didn't have an internet connection 9 days.
__________________
Jon Vermilye My Travel Blog
Travel and Photo Web Page ... My Collection of RV Blogs 2018 F150 3.5EB, 2017 21
Vermilye is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2020, 10:26 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
EdColorado's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: Front Range, Colorado
Trailer: 2018 21’
Posts: 591
Like us, you live in CO. Between CO, UT, NM and AZ, there is no need to stay in a formal campground and pay for camping unless that is your preference.
We've been at this for many years and have never felt uncomfortable camping all by ourselves. In fact, that's our preference.
There are lots of blogs by campers, including several solo women, who boondock by choice. I've never heard of any one of them being threatened.

Within an easy days drive from Boulder you will find dozens of great boondocking opportunities. Two days drive and you will find hundreds. Go for it.
EdColorado is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2020, 11:25 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
UncleTim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Location: Boulder, Colorado
Trailer: 2020 Escape 5.0TA "Zen"
Posts: 357
Quote:
Originally Posted by EdColorado View Post
Like us, you live in CO. Between CO, UT, NM and AZ, there is no need to stay in a formal campground and pay for camping unless that is your preference.
We've been at this for many years and have never felt uncomfortable camping all by ourselves. In fact, that's our preference.
There are lots of blogs by campers, including several solo women, who boondock by choice. I've never heard of any one of them being threatened.

Within an easy days drive from Boulder you will find dozens of great boondocking opportunities. Two days drive and you will find hundreds. Go for it.

Totally agree on Colorado sites Ed. I was hoping you would contribute your opinion. We have more than enough boondocking opportunities just out back with a view of the continental divide. And Wyoming and Utah are even more skewed towards remote areas that are either national forest, BLM or open range. The farther West you go, the more opportunities there are.

I agree with Jim's assessment that East of the Mississippi the options are much more limited although still present. I grew up in Indiana and Michigan. Michigan is loaded with every kind of camping imaginable and absolutely breathtaking scenery. I am not sure of the West coast opportunities. The Redwoods offer some opportunities but my knowledge is limited.
UncleTim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2020, 01:14 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
dfandrews's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Ventura County, California
Trailer: 2015 Escape 17A -- "The Pullman"
Posts: 1,969
It depends. If we are in sight-seeing mode, we try to get to showers periodically, so we'll get hookups or a KOA-type facility for 1-2 days. In between we can do with just a spot to park.
If we camp in AZ, even in the North (6-7000 elev.), we'll go with electric hookups, which AZ State parks many times have. (A/C and electric heat).

When primarily camping/fishing, it is total boondock mode. It's nice to have toilets, even pit-type, close by, but not necessary.
E.G. Eastern Sierra Nevada Mts., we are typically at 8-10,000 ft. elevation, at some Forest Service spot. Amenities are maybe a picnic table and a bear box; that's about it.
All that being said, that's part of the reason we chose the particular Escape, and options, that we did (17A). For some details of our decisions, part of which answered the question you asked, see this:
https://www.escapeforum.org/forums/f...ater-8933.html
__________________
Don & Teresa
2015 17A: 2011 Honda Pilot
In Orbe Terrum Non Visi / RLTW
dfandrews is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2020, 01:47 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: White Bird, Idaho
Trailer: 2018 Escape 19, "Zen Purple", 2017 4X4 Chevy Colorado/Duramax
Posts: 221
I too am a long-term backpacker. river runner, and tent camper. My main criterion in camping is to find solitude, or at least camp somewhere there isn't another rig right next to us. I really don't want to see or hear anyone else, unless we are with friends. Therefore, we are committed boondockers. We camp to get away from news, internet, television, and finding a place with no cell service is an added bonus. That may sound strange to a lot of folks, but not to us.

In my opinion, it's a wonderful feeling to be camped out in a beautiful spot, totally disconnected from the world and much of its ugliness, blissfully ignorant of what's happening elsewhere in the world. I have found being connected to news and social media 24/7 does not enhance my life, and it is incredibly liberating to be in places unaffected by artificial light and the sounds of civilization. Our Escape is set up nicely for this style of camping. We picked it up in September 2018, and other than charging the batteries, cooling the fridge down on AC, and checking to see if the air conditioner actually works, it has never been hooked up to shore power. Maybe one day if we're traveling and it's really hot, we'll got to an RV park and hook it up so we can run the air conditioner, but so far that hasn't happened!
salmo7000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2020, 02:14 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Greg A's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Phoenix, Arizona
Trailer: 2015 Escape 19 "Seventy Degrees"
Posts: 3,099
Our favorite spot is N of Flagstaff AZ, over 8000 ft and no hookups. 14 day limit, but they’ll wink,wink slide it a bit, and old mans park pass gets you a night at $12.
We do about 60/40 boondocking vs commercial, the trailer can do whatever type stay we want so really doesn’t factor in to whether we stay or not.
Greg A is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2020, 03:32 PM   #11
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Lakewood, Colorado
Trailer: 2018 5.0TA 'Liberty'
Posts: 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg A View Post
Our favorite spot is N of Flagstaff AZ, over 8000 ft and no hookups. 14 day limit, but they’ll wink,wink slide it a bit, and old mans park pass gets you a night at $12.
We do about 60/40 boondocking vs commercial, the trailer can do whatever type stay we want so really doesn’t factor in to whether we stay or not.
We have family in Cottonwood so travel that way quite a bit. We need a recommendation for a nice place to stop. Would you mind sharing name of the campground near Flag?

THX!
HarleyD
HarleyD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2020, 05:26 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Abiquiu, New Mexico
Trailer: 2019 Escape 21 2017 GMC Canyon Duramax Diesel
Posts: 226
Goldilocks campers are us. So long as it is not too hot or not too cold, we are OK without a power hookup. On our last trip before lockdown in March, we spent 4 nights at Organ Pipe Nat Mon without hookups (our first time w/o power) and our 2019 E21 trailer worked really well for us. I was worried that the CPAP and furnace combined power draw overnight would be two much for the 2 6v batteries but it was not a problem. I saw 12.5v battery voltage one morning but nothing lower. With our successful no power Organ Pipe experience behind us, I think we will not shy away from no hookup sites in the future. We have the ETI solar on the roof and also used a Renogy 100 watt portable. We were fully charged up by 10am each day. Camping by ourselves in a remote area might be a bridge too far for us presently but as we become more comfortable with no hookups, prehaps we will give that a try. I have to have cellphone Internet for what I do which is location limiting.
Chama is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2020, 06:21 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
Vermilye's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Oswego, New York
Trailer: 2017 Escape 21, 2018 Ford F150
Posts: 3,809
Quote:
Originally Posted by HarleyD View Post
We have family in Cottonwood so travel that way quite a bit. We need a recommendation for a nice place to stop. Would you mind sharing name of the campground near Flag?

THX!
HarleyD
If you are describing Cottonwood, AZ, you can't beat the local state park, Dead Horse Ranch.
__________________
Jon Vermilye My Travel Blog
Travel and Photo Web Page ... My Collection of RV Blogs 2018 F150 3.5EB, 2017 21
Vermilye is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2020, 06:31 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
dfandrews's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Ventura County, California
Trailer: 2015 Escape 17A -- "The Pullman"
Posts: 1,969
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vermilye View Post
If you are describing Cottonwood, AZ, you can't beat the local state park, Dead Horse Ranch.
__________________
Don & Teresa
2015 17A: 2011 Honda Pilot
In Orbe Terrum Non Visi / RLTW
dfandrews is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2020, 08:30 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
h2owmn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: Placerville, California
Trailer: 2018 Escape 17A double dinette
Posts: 1,038
I third the recommendation for Dead Horse Ranch State Park. There are cool historical spots nearby to visit, the town of Jerome nearby, and it's not too far from Sedona. Plus really good BBQ very near the park.
__________________
--Time and trouble will tame an advanced young woman, but an advanced older woman is uncontrollable by any earthly force. --Dorothy Sayers
h2owmn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2020, 08:33 PM   #16
Site Team
 
padlin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Southwick, Massachusetts
Trailer: 5.0 TA #6, 2012 F150 EB
Posts: 6,290
Quote:
Originally Posted by h2owmn View Post
Plus really good BBQ very near the park.

We ate at Hog Wild 4 times in 2 weeks.
__________________
Happy Motoring
Bob
padlin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2020, 09:00 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
barry's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Fraser Valley, British Columbia
Trailer: 2012 Escape "Classic" 5.0 SA
Posts: 546
As a kid and teen we always camped and that meant BC Provincial Parks. $2 per night, no reservations, (you didn't need them) pit toilets and a water spigot somewhere near. In my late 20's I made a camper for my Toyota truck and decided to venture south into Washington and was blown away by the fact that the state parks had hookups ...................
Barry
__________________
Photography website: https://bjustice.zenfolio.com

2012 Escape "Classic" 5.0 SA / 2017 F150, 2.7 EcoBoost 4X4 Supercab
Former trailers: 2005 Escape 17B / 1972 Boler 13'
barry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2020, 09:24 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
arniesea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Bremerton, Washington
Trailer: 2019 5.0 TA
Posts: 1,009
One of the things I love about our Escape 5.0 with solar is that it is adaptable for every kind of camping. We actually mix it up pretty good. Rally's, state and national park camping, boon docking, Bluegrass Festivals, & Urban camping to explore a city or town in depth.

For example we spent 5 days at the Cherry Hill RV resort outside of Washington DC last October. It has a Metro bus stop right in the campground plus a dog walking service. So we were able to take transit into the District each day, exploring the Smithsonian Museums, restaurants and sights. On the same trip we driveway camped with family and friends 3 different times, camped in state parks, county parks, National Parks, and overnighted in trucker's parking.

Our last trip to AZ had more boon docking but all of the above as well - including an off the beating path hot springs in south eastern Oregon. Then on the way home, all Redwoods and Oregon Coast camping. Basically we do it all and often on the same excursion.
__________________
- Arnie & Paula & Kizzy the rat terrier
https://www.arniesea.com
- 2019 5.0 TA, 2017 Tundra Platinum.
- Bremerton, WA
arniesea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2020, 06:53 AM   #19
Senior Member
 
Jim Bennett's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Trailer: 2017 Escape 5.0 TA
Posts: 14,690
Boondocking historically is living/camping in the boondocks. Many now call camping without hookups, even in a populated area boondocking. All camping can be good.

Like others I came from a life of backcountry travel, canoe trips, backpacking and ski touring were all done on a regular basis. No matter what I get to see and do with my Escape, nothing will ever beat the experiences I gained doing this. I just love the getting away from it all, including cell phone reception. I was hoping to do a canoe trip this summer, but will have to see.

With the trailer I very much prefer boondocking or at least getting away from hookups. I do not mind some people around, and while campground camping with neighbours close by is not always all that bad, I do prefer a bit of distance and the ability to camp with another trailer or two that may be with you.

From home, weekend trips are definitely off the grid at our 60+ acre rec property I own with my brothers. A wonderful property with just over 1/2 mile of river and a great clearing set up for camping in. Here we all have our family and friends join us. Great for those quick and shorter getaways.

I really like BLM land where they have it, and last year when on the Baja camped on a few beaches that were real nice, one had no other RVs at it and some had not very many.

As far as campgrounds go, I very much prefer the provincial and state style, as they mostly are placed in a really good area with lots to do and usually great campgrounds surroundings. There are a few more rustic private ones that are not too bad.

While I have stayed at a few private RV campgrounds over the years, they are actually my least favourite place to camp. Some are really not camping, but more of a mostly permanent place for many to park their huge RVs and live in the summer. I much prefer a lake, ocean or river to swim in than a pool.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Vermilye View Post
If you are describing Cottonwood, AZ, you can't beat the local state park, Dead Horse Ranch.
I too have to agree with this, just about the nicest southern US campground we stayed at for two weeks last year and two weeks the year before. Sedona is nice to visit but is not really a place I want to camp much in given there is very little of that available. So many nice things to do in the area.

The first year we had a nice site for a few days, but had to leave it for a reservation coming in. We had friends coming to meet us and went to the overflow loop which actually is not too bad. It is cheaper due to no hookups, yet still has a nice bathroom/shower facility, fresh water available, and we can still use the dump station. Last year we never got a reservation and just went to the overflow.
Quote:
Originally Posted by padlin View Post
We ate at Hog Wild 4 times in 2 weeks.
Though we did try out a few great places to eat around the Cottonwood area, we never ate there. Maybe next time.....
__________________
2017 Escape 5.0 TA
2015 Ford F150 Lariat 3.5L EcoBoost
2009 Escape 19 (previous)
“Most folks are about as happy as they make up their minds to be.” — Abraham Lincoln
Jim Bennett is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2020, 08:27 AM   #20
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Burlington, Vermont
Trailer: 2014 17b/RAV4 (sold) 2011Chevy Colorado
Posts: 686
We would like to do more boondocking than we do but my wife always worries we will get rousted in the middle of the night for camping in a place we shouldn't. My attitude is "oh well" but that doesn't fly with her. Lots of nice state campgrounds here in new england however.
__________________

yardsale is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by Escape Trailer Industries or any of its affiliates. This is an independent, unofficial site.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:55 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2012 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.
×