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Old 01-10-2018, 03:54 PM   #1
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Question Re. Inverter with Transfer Switch

I'm contemplating having this option on my 2018 Escape 19. So, just wondering how it is wired on the 120 volt side. My understanding is that the transfer switch basically switched the AC from the shore power input to the inverter when activated. I understand that the AC, converter, and frig should not be powered fro the inverter for obvious reasons. So, are the 120 volt circuits for those 3 devices run separately to shore power only? Or, is it up to the user to be sure those devices are just not turned on when using the inverter? Have not been able to get this info from ETI as yet.

Thanks for your advice!

Carl
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Old 01-10-2018, 04:25 PM   #2
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Hey Carl,
We have a 1500 inverter. When you plug into shore power, it uses a converter to convert to 12volt. Your fridge has the option of being on shore power or propane. Our fridge does not have the battery option, but that would not be a good idea anyway in our experience with older camper fridges! They run down much too fast.
AC(I think you mean air conditioner?) can only be powered by shore power or a portable generator able to generate enough power to run it comfortably (2000w?) As you suggest, AC uses too much power for the innverter.
Our understanding is that there is not enough battery power to run the AC. The inverter changes battery power 12 volt to 120 volt and is useful for small devices like coffee pot, juicer, charger laptop and cordless drill etc. When you press the inverter switch it will convert the battery power to 120 volt.
Hope that helps. You will no doubt see many useful responses to this though!! When you come for a visit we can try to elaborate more.
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Old 01-10-2018, 04:46 PM   #3
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The transfer switch makes all of your 120V outlets live when you turn on the inverter. If you get the inverter without the transfer switch then you only have one live outlet on the inverter itself when you turn it on.

You are correct that certain items are wired so they can only be operated off shore power (not the inverter), which include fridge, air conditioner, 2-way water heater, and I feel like I’m forgetting something else...

In short, these are wired so they don’t run off the inverter so they won’t kill your batteries, as they’re high draw items.
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Old 01-10-2018, 05:03 PM   #4
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There are a separate pair of circuit breakers for the receptacles (I haven't checked how they are wired, but if I had to guess, one would be for the microwave, and the other for the rest of the receptacles). The transfer switch is fed by a breaker in the converter, and the inverter. In the "off" position, the feed from the converter goes through the normally closed contacts on the transfer switch, and out to the separate breaker panel with the two breakers. When the inverter is turned on, after a 45 or so second delay, the contacts in the transfer switch "switch", and the AC from the inverter feeds the separate breaker panel that feeds the microwave & receptacles.
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Old 01-10-2018, 05:14 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vermilye View Post
(I haven't checked how they are wired, but if I had to guess, one would be for the microwave, and the other for the rest of the receptacles).
I did check in my 5.0TA, but can't find the sheet I put it on, but I believe the microwave was on the same circuit as the loft plugs, as well as the one on the right as you enter the door. The dinette, outside and dinette plugs were on the other. I am guessing something similar was done with the 21.
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Old 01-10-2018, 06:21 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Vermilye View Post
There are a separate pair of circuit breakers for the receptacles (I haven't checked how they are wired, but if I had to guess, one would be for the microwave, and the other for the rest of the receptacles). The transfer switch is fed by a breaker in the converter, and the inverter. In the "off" position, the feed from the converter goes through the normally closed contacts on the transfer switch, and out to the separate breaker panel with the two breakers. When the inverter is turned on, after a 45 or so second delay, the contacts in the transfer switch "switch", and the AC from the inverter feeds the separate breaker panel that feeds the microwave & receptacles.
This is correct. It's how my 19 is wired as well, sans the microwave. Don't worry about it trying to run the Air Conditioner from the inverter. It won't, for a couple of reasons. First, it's not wired that way, and second, the 1500W inverter doesn't output enough power to start it even if it was. It possibly could run the fridge if it was wired to do so (it's not) but I can't think of a better way to drain your batteries quickly than trying to run the fridge on AC power from an inverter.
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Old 01-11-2018, 08:26 AM   #7
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Thanks for the info everyone! So, it sounds like ETI has things wired OK. Guess my engineering DNA just likes to know the details behind everything :-) Would do the install myself but thinking it will be nice to have it already installed when I pick up so I can use it during the extended trip home. Thanks again.
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