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Old 03-06-2019, 03:32 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian B-P View Post
I suppose if you're on a year-long trip covering thousands of kilometres this would make sense. Otherwise, why not do bearing maintenance at home? There's no reason for it to be a daily or even monthly thing.
Even a yearly thing is really overdoing it. My trailer has 15" wheels and carrying no more weight than a medium sized car which would see no more wheel bearing maintenance than every brake replacement, about 50k miles +/-. Then I wouldn't need a grease gun either, I'd clean and pack by hand. But that's a whole different thread ��
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Old 03-06-2019, 03:42 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by Chotch View Post
Even a yearly thing is really overdoing it. My trailer has 15" wheels and carrying no more weight than a medium sized car which would see no more wheel bearing maintenance than every brake replacement, about 50k miles +/-. Then I wouldn't need a grease gun either, I'd clean and pack by hand. But that's a whole different thread ��
That is true. I think the only time I ever repacked wheel bearings on a car without doing a brake job was when someone wanted a 30,000 mile maintenance by the book.
It is handy to have grease to put on the trailer ball though.
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Old 03-06-2019, 05:14 PM   #23
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i usually carry (behind the seat in my truck) a big extra heavy duty pure copper jumper cable, a ViaAir compressor, a tow strap, two 'truck boxes', one with sockets + open ends, the other with miscellaneous electrical tools (cutters, crimpers, pliers, strippers, etc), a Fluke DVM. In the trailer box, is a tire lug wrench, the big wrench for the water heater anode, a medium and large hammer, and a large/long phillips screwdriver. ALso in the truck is a bajillion-in-one driver bit kit that has hollow end 'security' bits for almost everything imaginable.
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Old 03-06-2019, 07:12 PM   #24
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Tool Kit?

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Originally Posted by Farther View Post
I think someone reported it was a #2.


There are also a handful of #1’s (Robertson, square bit screws) throughout our trailers. The multi tip screwdriver that ETI thoughtfully included with our trailer when we purchased it includes both of these, plus a bunch of other tips, and is a nice quality tool to boot.
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Old 03-06-2019, 07:19 PM   #25
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There are also a handful of #1’s (Robertson, square bit screws) throughout our trailers. The multi tip screwdriver that ETI thoughtfully included with our trailer when we purchased it includes both of these, plus a bunch of other tips, and is a nice quality tool to boot.

And, if you need a spare , they sell the multi-tip screw driver in their showroom shop
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Old 03-13-2019, 11:19 AM   #26
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Another thought - I have a zippered canvas tool bag with a few essentials in it (that have seen good use) that I store in my front storage box. The box isn't watertight as Escape will tell you and it didn't take long to have a bag full of rusty tools! Whatever. They still work and I really don't have the storage space inside my 17B.
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Old 03-13-2019, 12:02 PM   #27
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Tools? Yup I probably got one or something we can make work...what are you up to?? Although I must admit to avoiding getting sucked into the projects on old neglected rigs that seem to just snowball!
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Old 03-13-2019, 12:59 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by Brian B-P View Post
I suppose if you're on a year-long trip covering thousands of kilometres this would make sense. Otherwise, why not do bearing maintenance at home? There's no reason for it to be a daily or even monthly thing.
How about, there was ice and snow at home and it was warm at Q'site.

I'm not sure how relevant these types of discussions are. I seen folks that barely knew what end of a screwdriver to hold. I don't thing that an extensive tool kit would help them much. I'd say it you don't have lot's of tools that you use at home then your need for tools will be less than those folks who routinely use lots of tools when at home.

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Old 03-13-2019, 02:45 PM   #29
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I’ll second the comment on the changeable bit Screwdriver from Escape. After I got mine I bought a similar driver with the stubby short handle for tight places. It’s a Milwaukee with like 7 double ended bits. About $12. Took all other screw drivers out of my kit except for a stout flat blade driver used for screwdriver abuse. ( prying). I’ve got an ice pick in there too for finding and aligning screw holes and starting small screws in wood. Probably not the way to do it but I started heavy and lightened the tool kit as time went by. I only have the sockets I know are used on the Escape, not all the 1/2 inch sizes. I have a full quarter drive socket set with metrics now because I didn’t have the metric size someone needed one day. I am a believer in a torque wrench 30 to 150 lbs. I/2 inch drive. The Harbor Freight unit on sale for $10 or $13 about monthly will do fine. It won’t hurt to have a short 1/2 inch size extension too. Though you can spend more if you like high polish. A couple small 4 and 6 inch good crescent wrenches can cover a lot of situations. Even though purists will tell you they are not really a wrench, when you say “don’t borrow mine then” they usually get quiet and say thanks later.
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Old 03-14-2019, 08:23 AM   #30
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I can think of one spare part that needs consideration. A spare flush valve for the toilet. If the valve goes bad and stays open there is no way to turn off the city water. On our Casita we installed a valve in the line going to the toilet so that when it went bad we simply just shut the valve until repairs could be made.

Oh I almost forgot, the tool between your ears needs to be kept in good working order. Unfortunately, there is no spare or replacement.
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Old 03-14-2019, 09:24 AM   #31
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I can think of one spare part that needs consideration. A spare flush valve for the toilet. If the valve goes bad and stays open there is no way to turn off the city water. On our Casita we installed a valve in the line going to the toilet so that when it went bad we simply just shut the valve until repairs could be made.
Good suggestions.
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Old 03-14-2019, 10:07 AM   #32
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I have, on two occasions, de-hitched unexpectedly, en route. When that happens and the tongue is nested down in the safety chains and touching the pavement because you stopped, assessed the issue, and backed the tow up 6 or so inches to relieve the tension, you are then faced with one very big problem. How do I lift up that tongue to get it re-seated on the ball?

After chocking the tires you see you cannot use the built in tongue jack. Your bottle jack is too tall to fit under there. That's when the one tool you carry you thought you'd never need comes to the rescue. Your low profile scizzer jack. It's a bacon saver.
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Old 03-14-2019, 10:26 AM   #33
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I have, on two occasions, de-hitched unexpectedly, en route. When that happens and the tongue is nested down in the safety chains and touching the pavement because you stopped, assessed the issue, and backed the tow up 6 or so inches to relieve the tension, you are then faced with one very big problem. How do I lift up that tongue to get it re-seated on the ball?

After chocking the tires you see you cannot use the built in tongue jack. Your bottle jack is too tall to fit under there. That's when the one tool you carry you thought you'd never need comes to the rescue. Your low profile scizzer jack. It's a bacon saver.

Having had that happen with a fully (over)loaded utility trailer, I can attest to the scissor jack need. It now resides neatly in the corner of the dinette seat storage, on the wheel well hump.
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Old 03-14-2019, 10:41 AM   #34
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What were the circumstances around the de-hitching?
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Old 03-14-2019, 11:12 AM   #35
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The first time it was with my '86 Scamp on a highway. I didn't realize it, before leaving home I had needed to adjust the loose jaw tension of the hitch, and it still had a hair too much play in it. My bad - when we hit that rough seam. Lot's of scraped damage on that one.

The second time was with the Escape, when pulling out of the Happy Traveler campground in Palm Springs. Big dip in rain gutter from driveway end out to street. Since I had failed to put my Master lock through the hitch lever, the sharp angle caused it to pop off the ball. Again, my bad, but no damage. On this one the big problem was the pavement angle since we were broaching that gutter dip.

Oh, I forgot - a third time it happened was driving into a state park in New Mexico that had big drainage dips spaced across the paved road, every couple hundred yards, to facilitate run-off. I got impatient and went through one just a tad too fast. Again, no Master lock on the tongue lever.
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Old 03-14-2019, 11:28 AM   #36
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I noted Donna’s list included a Ryobi 18 v compressor. I am all 18 V Milwaukee. They only have a 12v battery compressor. However I talked to a good friend who is a tool salesman here locally a couple weeks ago and he gave me hope that he’d heard the 18v Milwaukee May well be in the development stage. So I guess I’ll wait a while on that development to see if it comes true. After you buy a couple kits with two or three batteries you can switch to bare tool purchases as you have batteries and chargers aplenty. I’m waiting to see the 18v chainsaw in action but it intrigues me. I check in many campgrounds as to the legality of picking up dead wood. Legal about half the time from my experience. Best deal I ever got, I asked the camp host in an Illinois State Park about firewood, she told me that weekend was her last for the season and I could have all the oak she had. There was about a cord behind her trailer. Two arm loads were all I was good for but it was very nice firewood.
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Old 03-14-2019, 11:46 AM   #37
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I noted Donna’s list included a Ryobi 18 v compressor. I am all 18 V Milwaukee.
My go-to cordless stuff is Makita and apparently, Makita has no 18v compressor either. A 12v might be a good alternative. I should have taken the 12v compressor out of my Miata when I traded it for my tow vehicle.
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Old 03-14-2019, 12:50 PM   #38
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Speaking of 18V compressors, and Ryobi specifically, this is the one that I have, which is okay but could be more robust IMG_0702.jpg

But, Ryobi recently came out with this one, which is what I’ll be getting when the current one dies. Slick, and only $99 at the Home Depot IMG_0701.jpg
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Old 03-14-2019, 01:59 PM   #39
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I have, on two occasions, de-hitched unexpectedly, en route. When that happens and the tongue is nested down in the safety chains and touching the pavement because you stopped, assessed the issue, and backed the tow up 6 or so inches to relieve the tension, you are then faced with one very big problem. How do I lift up that tongue to get it re-seated on the ball?

After chocking the tires you see you cannot use the built in tongue jack.
I assume that the safety chains were in the way of the tongue jack foot, although that seems strange for properly mounted chains.

If that's a problem, this may be the time to disregard (just this once) the instructions for the front stabilizer jacks: put them down (but not the rear ones!) and crank them just enough to loosen the chains so you can use the tongue jack. They have more than enough capacity, but are not intended for cranking while under load, so you don't want to do this often.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MyronL View Post
Your bottle jack is too tall to fit under there. That's when the one tool you carry you thought you'd never need comes to the rescue. Your low profile scizzer jack. It's a bacon saver.
Whatever the tug comes with for spare tire changing is potentially the needed tool. I would certainly use my van's scissor jack.
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Old 03-14-2019, 02:06 PM   #40
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Until Makita comes out with an 18v compressor (so I don't have to have additional batteries) this 12v looks promising.
https://smile.amazon.com/EPAuto-Port...s%2C281&sr=8-3
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