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Old 07-31-2017, 03:45 PM   #1
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tool kit--what to put in it?

Hi All,
We are picking up our 21' Escape August 31st! Whoohoo!!!!! So, lots of planning going on in our household.

One of our questions we'd love to ask the community for help with is what do you all suggest putting in a trailer toolkit?

BTW, this forum has been tremendously helpful as we finalized our build sheet and started figuring out what things we needed, how to do xyz, and so on. We are newbies, so I've spent hours 'studying' various threads soaking up as much info as I can. I've actually not asked many questions as there are so many threads for an amazing array of topics. (I might have missed one on toolkits!) THANKS TO ALL OF YOU!
LINDA
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Old 07-31-2017, 04:01 PM   #2
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Sarah had a good thread on this topic.

http://www.escapeforum.org/forums/f7...ons-10663.html
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Old 07-31-2017, 04:10 PM   #3
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So much depends on a persons abilities. Some probably don't really have much at all. I'm on the other end of the spectrum and probably have more tools with me than some folks have in a home workshop. It's a comfort level thing.

I was asked once if by any chance I had some duct tape. What width and color do you want?

Aside from the obvious stuff like screwdrivers etc. the one thing I encourage folks to have is a simple multi-meter. So many potential problems can be pinpointed with one.

Ron
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Old 07-31-2017, 04:35 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by Ron in BC View Post
Aside from the obvious stuff like screwdrivers etc. the one thing I encourage folks to have is a simple multi-meter. So many potential problems can be pinpointed with one.

Ron
Just make sure you keep the instruction manual next to the meter. If you don't use it often, you won't have a clue what does what, and for what purpose.
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Old 07-31-2017, 06:33 PM   #5
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Thanks much. That's a helpful thread.
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Old 07-31-2017, 06:35 PM   #6
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Thanks Ron. Ours will probably be fairly basic though Ken has fixed an amazing number of things over the years.
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Old 07-31-2017, 06:42 PM   #7
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I had to look up multimeter. Thanks for suggestion Ron. And gbaglo, thanks for reminder about instructional manual!
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Old 07-31-2017, 07:03 PM   #8
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The simple, about 10 buck kind, don't need much of an instruction manual. The steps needed to turn it on to read voltage in the 12 volt or 110 range are pretty obvious.

So many times folks have posted questions about why something wasn't working. It's kind of frustrating, knowing that if they had a simple multi-meter, they probably could have tracked down the problem.

If you do nothing else, learn how to set it to 12 volts DC and try checking the accessible wiring near the panel. Also learn how to set it to the 110 AC for checking voltage at plugs etc.

Ron
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Old 07-31-2017, 08:59 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by padlin View Post
Sarah had a good thread on this topic.

http://www.escapeforum.org/forums/f7...ons-10663.html
Thanks Bob!

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Old 07-31-2017, 09:17 PM   #10
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Hey thanks again Ron. That is VERY helpful. I'm pretty psyched about the trailer and want to learn how to troubleshoot at least the more basic things.
Linda
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Old 07-31-2017, 09:28 PM   #11
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1) a hacksaw blade--I have a bare blade in every car or truck

2) batteries--a few AA and AAA with the multi-meter to check them.

3) digital air gauge--over inflated tires are nearly as bad as under inflated. Check when cool. 50psi for trailer. Possibly a 12v $20 inflator, too. It's cord needs to be pretty long.

4) battery powered drill/driver with recharger. Set it up with a driver and socket to fit the hand-cranked stabilizer legs. Takes two seconds per leg instead of way longer.

5) a $2 funnel with a corrugated (bendy) neck. For filling the fresh water when the hose won't reach. Dollar store.

6) Worth repeating: torque wrench. Harbor Freight for $9.99 is good enough, but you must have one and know how to use it on lug nuts.

7) full size synthetic broom. Use inside of course, but also for concrete patio, so you don't "track in."

8) Something to drive up onto with your good tire if you have a dual axle and need to change a flat. There is no jack in the trailer. If getting a single axle, you'll definitely want a suitable jack, and you car's probably won't work.

9) An adapter that lets your 30 amp trailer cord plug into a home outlet. Check Walmart or Harbor Freight.

10) Light-duty pair of locks to go on the front storage box.

Good luck
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Old 07-31-2017, 10:42 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Bill and Earline View Post

4) battery powered drill/driver with recharger. Set it up with a driver and socket to fit the hand-cranked stabilizer legs. Takes two seconds per leg instead of way longer.
I have a little difficulty with this one. I know several people use this set-up but I have a couple of reservations about it.

One, I find it noisy. I'd hate to be next to someone doing that, even for a brief time.

Two, the drill rattles the leg down without a lot of feedback. I find that the open lead screw on the stabilizer can get pretty encrusted with road grit etc. When using hand power you can feel when it needs cleaning. Whipping it up and down when it needs cleaning probably shortens its' life.

Ron
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Old 08-01-2017, 06:07 AM   #13
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I agree that certain drill/drivers can be noisy. I switched to my current DeWalt one that is very quiet. When leaving at the crack of dawn, I start the truck for its one minute idle before pulling away, and that's when I do the final step of drilling up the stabilizers and driving away. No one is disturbed.

I never noticed much grit on the screw portion, when originally doing this by hand or now this way, but we don't do much off-roading.
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Old 08-01-2017, 07:45 AM   #14
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Ron, I hear you on this!

My 12v Bosch cordless drill is quiet and underpowered compared to the big 18v jobs. It allows me to raise and lower my Bigfoot's scissor jacks pretty quietly. The relatively lower power caused it to "lug" when the screw needed attention.

Even so, when leaving at the crack of dawn, I really try not to disturb the quiet that attracts us to camping in the first place. Small sounds travel a long way and sound loud when there's nothing else to drown them out! Fortunately, I rarely depart before 8:30 or 9:00 so this is rarely an issue for me.

Rich
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Old 08-01-2017, 11:13 AM   #15
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2) batteries--a few AA and AAA with the multi-meter to check them.

7) full size synthetic broom. Use inside of course, but also for concrete patio, so you don't "track in."


10) Light-duty pair of locks to go on the front storage box.
I agree most emphatically about the battery checker, a broom (and a mat to put on the ground just outside your door ) and would just add that the locks need to be corrosion proof. Even though they are small, get good brass bodied locks that you can spray wd40 into regularly.
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Old 08-01-2017, 11:34 AM   #16
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Even though they are small, get good brass bodied locks that you can spray wd40 into regularly.
Locksmiths do not approve of using WD40 to gum up the works. They recommend powdered graphite. Costs less than $10 for a lifetime supply at any hardware store.
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Old 08-01-2017, 11:51 AM   #17
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Found one of these at an auto zone or Oreilleys for under $15...very handy, holds 30 different bits and the driver itself is a 1/4" driver. The smallest Phillips head tightens eyeglasses!

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Old 08-01-2017, 01:05 PM   #18
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Along with the torque wrench, a 1/2" drive breaker bar, and heavy-duty sockets. Harbor Freight has a combo-set, with a very handy 3" extension. Item #62491. It has sockets for lug nuts on the trailer, and both of our vehicles. Also, watch their sale ads: Among their frequent "free with any purchase" items is a digital multi-meter, that is good enough for any of your trailering needs.
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Old 08-01-2017, 01:44 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by Ron in BC View Post
So much depends on a persons abilities. Some probably don't really have much at all. I'm on the other end of the spectrum and probably have more tools with me than some folks have in a home workshop. It's a comfort level thing.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron in BC View Post

I was asked once if by any chance I had some duct tape. What width and color do you want?

Aside from the obvious stuff like screwdrivers etc. the one thing I encourage folks to have is a simple multi-meter. So many potential problems can be pinpointed with one.

Ron

See the bold statement I fall into the probably have a better kit and box of spares then most. And as he states it depends on your comfort level with making minor repairs. Along with a means to change a tire on the camper IE a 4 way and the Anderson tire chock or jack.

Cypher
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Old 08-01-2017, 10:56 PM   #20
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Thanks everyone for your input. Not only helpful with putting our tool kit together, but also good reminders about being a good citizen in campgrounds.
Only 30 days to go before we pick up our lovely trailer. ;-)
Linda
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