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Old 07-31-2020, 01:25 PM   #1
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Sloped driveway 2020

I stumbled on a previous post back some years on this wonderful forum. It prompted me to take a closer look at my driveway. We plan to have a slab poured next year on the side of the garage , but for now itís the driveway. The post from 2017 Iím referring to is here: https://www.escapeforum.org/forums/f...way-11253.html


Iíve included a couple of photos for you to see. The grade is about 7Ē over a 15í span, much of the drop is last couple of feet. I bought two Bal X Chocks today and Iím building blocks for the tongue Jack that Iíll bevel it a little for an even plane. I also will use standard heavy rubber chocks as well. The E19 arrives in about 10-14 days. What troubles me is the freezing rain we can get in my State. I was driving a company Econoline a few years back in the winter with freezing rain, I parked on a very mild slope and ran in a business for a customers signature. To my surprise the van slid about 15 feet. So, Iím a little concerned. Once again, thanks for any thoughts or advice.
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Old 07-31-2020, 02:01 PM   #2
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How about putting in a. couple of holes for a metal pipe or something into the concrete so that you can block the tires after parking with no possibility of slipping? (Not sure how I said that makes sense but basically like a tiny version of removable path block posts.)
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Old 07-31-2020, 02:01 PM   #3
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I think you'd have it covered with the "heavy rubber chocks" and the BAL-X chocks.

If you want more peace of mind, go for 4 rubber chocks, or make some out of wood.

Then, since you just need a temporary extra tie-down until you get your new pad poured, how about getting one or two of those large diameter corkscrews they use to tie large dogs out in the yard. They go about 12 to 14 inches into the ground. They are nearly impossible to move, once installed. It would be to the side of the trailer in your grass, but close enough. Then use a cable or chain from the corkscrew to maybe the rear receiver on the trailer or a wheel.

Again I think it's unnecessary since the freezing rain would never get under your tires, but you'd still worry.

It would also be a deterrent from any theoretical thief.
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Old 07-31-2020, 02:17 PM   #4
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Combining both Bobbie and Bill's suggestions, you could have a 2" pipe installed in the top center of your drive flush with the pavement. Then a 1-1/2" pipe could slide into it when needed with a shackle attached to the top. Then a chain or cable to the receiver on the rear bumper would solidly anchor your rig in place, but be completely out of the way when not in use.

Conversely you could install large eye bolts on either side of the garage door then make a "Y" yoke cable to the rear receiver. Attach it all with shackles.
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Old 07-31-2020, 02:22 PM   #5
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Combining both Bobbie and Bill's suggestions, you could have a 2" pipe installed in the top center of your drive flush with the pavement. Then a 1-1/2" pipe could slide into it when needed with a shackle attached to the top. Then a chain or cable to the receiver on the rear bumper would solidly anchor your rig in place, but be completely out of the way when not in use.
I like all of these thoughts. Iíve done a lot of core holes in my day. I like the idea! Will the bumper sustain holding the trailer? I know the carry weight of the bumper is only (downward weight) 150lbs or so.
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Old 07-31-2020, 02:28 PM   #6
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What troubles me is the freezing rain we can get in my State. I was driving a company Econoline a few years back in the winter with freezing rain, I parked on a very mild slope and ran in a business for a customers signature. To my surprise the van slid about 15 feet. So, I’m a little concerned. Once again, thanks for any thoughts or advice.
If your trailer is parked and stationary you shouldn't get ice between the tires and the driveway. Or the rubber caulks and the drive way for that matter. With the Econoline you parked on an icy surface. The icy surface didn't materialize under your vehicle. Also, part of what caused your Econoline to slide was when you park on ice, the heat from the tires, will melt the surface lubricating between the ice and the tires, making the ice extra slick. If it doesn't move normally, a freezing rain should NOT change that.
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Old 07-31-2020, 02:35 PM   #7
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If your trailer is parked and stationary you shouldn't get ice between the tires and the driveway. Or the rubber caulks and the drive way for that matter. With the Econoline you parked on an icy surface. The icy surface didn't materialize under your vehicle. Also, part of what caused your Econoline to slide was when you park on ice, the heat from the tires, will melt the surface lubricating between the ice and the tires, making the ice extra slick. If it doesn't move normally, a freezing rain should NOT change that.
A very good point!, my wild imagination sees a thaw in the day with rain and a freeze at night. Allowing water to seep under the tires and chocks and at night it freezes. Making things slippery. I can hardly walk to the end of the drive to retrieve mail at times..very slick under the perfect circumstances.
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Old 07-31-2020, 02:54 PM   #8
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After your new concrete cures for a year , I would not hesitate to use a good grade of ice melt ( not water softener or rock salt,) and also lay in a store of sand in the fall that can be kept dry and used on the driveway for safe traverse to and from the mailbox or to cars parked outside especially if you have guests or delivery folks in the winter. I buy 200 lbs of ice melt (Power Thaw) brand each fall for about 8 or 9 dollars a bag. 4 bags. Gets me through the Iowa winter on my 300 foot ascending driveway.
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Old 07-31-2020, 02:56 PM   #9
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A very good point!, my wild imagination sees a thaw in the day with rain and a freeze at night. Allowing water to seep under the tires and chocks and at night it freezes. Making things slippery. I can hardly walk to the end of the drive to retrieve mail at times..very slick under the perfect circumstances.
If the freezing rain gets pretty heavy, your trailer will get frozen to the ground. Freezing rain is common in the Portland area. One year, cars that got left out at my workplace froze so solidly to the ground that they could not begin to break free - the tires were on bare cement and could not move enough to even spin.
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Old 07-31-2020, 03:38 PM   #10
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A small thing.
Go with a broom finish on the concrete. That will give you a much more slip-resistant surface than a smooth trowel finish. Your chocks will get a better grip plus your footing will be more sure on a rainy day.
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Old 07-31-2020, 03:54 PM   #11
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Will the bumper sustain holding the trailer? I know the carry weight of the bumper is only (downward weight) 150lbs or so.
I suspect that if a crane hooked onto your rear bumper that it could lift the whole trailer up until it was pointing downwards. As far as the posted max. weight for the rear receiver goes it's more of a CYA situation to prevent overloading and light tongue weight etc.

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Old 07-31-2020, 04:37 PM   #12
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I like all of these thoughts. Iíve done a lot of core holes in my day. I like the idea! Will the bumper sustain holding the trailer? I know the carry weight of the bumper is only (downward weight) 150lbs or so.
Lateral pull weight should be fine. With my old 19' I used a winch and a cable around a hitch ball mounted in the rear receiver to pull my trailer into position up a steep driveway. I had a large wheel on the front jack.

With my 5.0 I have to unhitch, reposition my truck at a different angle, re-hitch and maneuver my trailer closer to the fence. I do this 3 times to get my trailer in a position far enough over that I can get my truck into the carport. My driveway is narrow right where I would need to swing the front of my truck to do it the first time. PITA.
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Old 07-31-2020, 07:20 PM   #13
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Thanks everyone. Anyone know the diameter of the tongue jack plate on a 19? How about the stab. jack plates?
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Old 07-31-2020, 10:17 PM   #14
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A couple of things to think about on a sloped driveway:
1. if the trailer is level, then the front wheels should be blocked up so that they are level with the rear wheels.
2. When hoisting or lowering the tongue, one set of wheels may (probably) lose contact with the planet and the BalX chock will be useless. Be prepared with some other kind of chocks. Ask me how I know.
3. I've solved the problem by building a little ramp with built in chocks. I back up a little further than necessary, slide the ramps in place, and then roll forward. The chocks will restrain both the truck and the trailer.
4. The custom chocks need to be low enough to clear the underside of the sewer and step.
5. If you build the ramps level with an extension from the centre of the rear wheels to the centre of the front wheels (I did this once but got rid of the monstrosities) then the trailer will have no inclination (pun alert) to move.
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Old 08-01-2020, 07:48 AM   #15
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3. I've solved the problem by building a little ramp with built in chocks. I back up a little further than necessary, slide the ramps in place, and then roll forward. The chocks will restrain both the truck and the trailer. e.
I use a 2x block under my front tires to maintain a near level slope for the tires. I really like the idea of making it a chock as well. I think I will do that.

Not dissimilar to what my dad used for tight garage parking 40-50 years ago, but with a totally different purpose. He used a two foot piece of plywood with a stop block on it set at a perfect distance for parking. As soon as the front tire touched the stop block, the car was in position.
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Old 08-01-2020, 10:03 AM   #16
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A couple of things to think about on a sloped driveway:
1. if the trailer is level, then the front wheels should be blocked up so that they are level with the rear wheels.
2. When hoisting or lowering the tongue, one set of wheels may (probably) lose contact with the planet and the BalX chock will be useless. Be prepared with some other kind of chocks. Ask me how I know.
3. I've solved the problem by building a little ramp with built in chocks. I back up a little further than necessary, slide the ramps in place, and then roll forward. The chocks will restrain both the truck and the trailer.
4. The custom chocks need to be low enough to clear the underside of the sewer and step.
5. If you build the ramps level with an extension from the centre of the rear wheels to the centre of the front wheels (I did this once but got rid of the monstrosities) then the trailer will have no inclination (pun alert) to move.
Thatís a nice idea. Iím not sure if I have a problem that would require this. A wood block under the tongue jack would need to be shimmed about 1 1/2Ē on the low end to make the block level. The tires are hard to tell since I donít have the trailer yet. But Iím guessing about a 1/2Ē lower on the front tire. The driveway takes much of the dive after about 14Ď from the garage.
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