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Old 01-31-2018, 12:18 AM   #1
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A radical new engine for the F150?

https://www.cnet.com/google-amp/news...un-at-reality/
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Old 01-31-2018, 08:53 AM   #2
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Let’s keep our fingers crossed on the beta sites. With those efficiency numbers, coupled with reliability, and emissions, it could be the future....
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Old 01-31-2018, 09:07 AM   #3
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ooooh sounds most interesting! Fingers crossed this pans out. About the time I'm ready to replace my current F-150, I hope this new engine has been tested over time as a winner.
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Old 01-31-2018, 09:13 AM   #4
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Two-cycle?!? Would one have to mix oil with the gas like a chainsaw?
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Old 01-31-2018, 09:27 AM   #5
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Most two cycles these days have automatic mixing, you fill both tanks and it handles it, I have had several 2 cycle motorcycles that did it this way.
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Old 01-31-2018, 10:38 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by War Eagle View Post
Two-cycle?!? Would one have to mix oil with the gas like a chainsaw?
2 cycles, but not in the same way as a chainsaw. No mixing. Not even spark plugs.

The big idea here, as the article points out, is to increase thermal efficiency. A jump from 25 percent efficiency to 45 is pretty dramatic. I would not mind 35 mpg at all with a similar power curve and torque. The elimination of valves and plugs also has the potential to dramatically reduce maintenance and increase durability.
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Old 01-31-2018, 11:20 AM   #7
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If this new engine runs as good as my Stihl chainsaw , I for one will be thrilled
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Old 01-31-2018, 02:15 PM   #8
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There seems to be a tendency for some online authors to extrapolate from one test installation to an actual plan for Ford to use this engine; that's wildly inappropriate. To Cooley's credit, he has resisted this silliness; others have not.

Also, the jump from 25% to 45% thermal efficiency is neither realistic nor sufficient. Conventional gasoline engines have long been past 25%, and Mazda has demonstrated comparable performance to the Achates claims in an engine which is well on it's way into production: Skyactiv-X using Spark Controlled Compression Ignition or "SPCCI". Skyactiv-X has been demonstrated in near-production prototypes, and is due in the 2019 model year (so, coming off the production line later this year) Mazda 3.

Novel engine designs are fascinating, and I want them to succeed, but in reality they usually have problems which prove insurmountable in production use. In this case, the design isn't even novel: there have been many opposed piston engines, not just in labs but in production... mostly powering aircraft. The video sort of touches on this, but suggests that previous opposed-piston engines never made production; Achates - to their credit - clearly acknowledges the earlier engines in the text on their website. These designs certainly have issues - one of them is fitting in an effective spark plug, so a compression-ignition opposed-piston engine makes sense. It made sense when Junkers made their diesel Jumo 205 engines starting in 1932; that's what Achates has copied.
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Old 01-31-2018, 02:19 PM   #9
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There is a big difference between concept and production, for sure. But, I do find the potential to dramatically increase the economy without sacrificing capability to be very interesting. We'll see.
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Old 01-31-2018, 02:40 PM   #10
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Two-cycle?!? Would one have to mix oil with the gas like a chainsaw?
No, that is a result of specific details of the design of lightweight all-position 2-strokes which do not apply to most large 2-stroke engines.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cpaharley2008 View Post
Most two cycles these days have automatic mixing, you fill both tanks and it handles it, I have had several 2 cycle motorcycles that did it this way.
It isn't really mixing, it's oil injection in addition to fuel delivery (carburetion or injection). A Mazda rotary does this, too. Anyway, putting oil into the intake air is not required for this or most large 2-strokes.

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2 cycles, but not in the same way as a chainsaw. No mixing.
Right. The reason that small 2-stokes need that oil is that the intake air goes through the crankcase, so that the bottom of the piston can be used to pump the fresh air-fuel mixture in and the exhaust out (which is called "scavenging")... the two things that a 4-stroke engine does on the extra two strokes. Since the intake air can't go through a crankcase full of oil, there must be some other way to lubricate the engine, and that's where in the mixed or injected oil comes in.

The alternative, used on all large 2-stroke engines, is external scavenging, which means to use an external air pump or blower to push the air through. This leaves the crankcase alone, so that conventional (wet-sump or dry-sump) lubrication can be used for the crankshaft, piston wrist pins, and cylinder walls.

The external scavenge blower is usually a mechanically driven supercharger; in the Achates design, both a turbocharger and a mechanical supercharger are used, which is the combination which should be expected in a modern 2-stroke compression-ignition design. It's also possible to use just a turbocharger, but with an electric motor on the turbo shaft as well to get it spinning and blowing before the engine starts.

If anyone has heard of a "6-71 blower" used on drag racing engines, that is the blower (mechanically driven scavenge pump) of a Detroit Diesel 6-cylinder (and 71 cubic inches per cylinder) two-stroke diesel engine, used as a supercharger on a four-stroke engine. Those Detroit Diesel Series 71 engines were produced from 1938 through 1995, included both the blower and a turbocharger in higher-output versions, and were common in many types of vehicles but were probably best known as bus engines. They were two-strokes with no oil mixing or injection.
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