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Old 08-18-2013, 07:26 PM   #1
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Jeep Wrangler

Hey all
I'm going to be making a trailer purchase in the very near future and I'm looking for suggestions on size.

I have a 2013 jeep wrangler with a tow rating up to 3600 pounds. Would this be ok with a 19 foot escape? I would have really liked a 21foot but it looks like that may be pushing things a little too much.

As I don'y like the alternative of going down to the 17 foot escape as I really need two double beds I may have to go into a different kind of trailer, Any other suggestions?

Thanks
Steve
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Old 08-18-2013, 07:32 PM   #2
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The Escape 19 would be too much for the Wrangler, it is rated for 4000#, way beyond your capacity.
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Old 08-18-2013, 07:47 PM   #3
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I assume that this is the Wrangler Unlimited, with its long wheelbase; it is the current (JK, 2007 and later) generation. I believe that the relatively short Wrangler two-door would not be rated as high as 3600 pounds, and would not be suitable even if it had that rating. While short Wranglers are notorious for concerns about towing stability, the current long-wheelbase model is a substantial vehicle which should be capable of towing a significant travel trailer.

With a 3600 pound trailer, how much allowance is there for passengers and cargo in the Wrangler? You need to look at the whole combination, versus the Gross Combined Weight Rating. Although a non-towing Wrangler can carry up to about 1000 pounds, I'm very sure that one is not rated to haul around its own weight, plus 1000 pounds of stuff in the Jeep, plus 3600 pounds of trailer, all at the same time. The GCWR is in the owner's manual (at least it was in 2010).

An Escape 19' is spec'd at 2510 pounds, dry and base. Add optional equipment, propane, water, and your stuff, and it could easily reach that 3600 pound level. Current 19' owners might comment on what their typical loaded weight is, although each owner's preferences and practices will determine their actual weight. The GVWR is 4000 pounds, and you must not exceed that, but nothing stops anyone from overloading a trailer, which would likely overload the Wrangler.

Which transmission and axle ratio does this Wrangler have?
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Old 08-18-2013, 07:49 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cpaharley2008 View Post
The Escape 19 would be too much for the Wrangler, it is rated for 4000#, way beyond your capacity.
4000 pounds is the trailer's Gross Vehicle Weight Rating; you don't need to load it that heavily. Jim, what did yours weigh when packed and going down the road?

As I mentioned, if the trailer is even 3600 pounds, that might be too much in combination with passengers and stuff in the Jeep.
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Old 08-18-2013, 07:57 PM   #5
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Escape 19's weighed and reported in the list in FiberglassRV at Trailer Weights in the Real World (also posted in Excel spreadsheet form by Jon at http://lakeshoreimages.com/spreadsheets/Weight.xls) vary from 3130 to 3980 pounds. At 3130, it seems quite reasonable for a long-wheelbase JK Wrangler; at 3980, it's too much trailer. Several hundred pounds makes a significant difference.
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Old 08-18-2013, 08:00 PM   #6
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Caution – Why Truck Tow Ratings don
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Old 08-18-2013, 08:09 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by Jubal View Post
Aside from general conspiracy accusations, that article addresses exactly what I am suggesting to Steve: look at the total rig versus GCWR, and the load in and on the Jeep versus the Jeep's GVWR, not just the trailer weight versus the trailer weight rating. If the author's style works for you, then this is a good exploration of how failing to understand weight ratings can get a trailer owners in trouble.

The author of that article apparently isn't very bright, asking "Is it feasible to assume the average truck owner will only add one passenger and a 5th wheel hitch to a crew cab pick-up when you go camping?" No, of course it isn't, and the ratings never claim that. Perhaps he can't read... but we can, so we can work through the Wrangler/Escape 19' case.
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Old 08-18-2013, 08:18 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian B-P View Post
I assume that this is the Wrangler Unlimited, with its long wheelbase; it is the current (JK, 2007 and later) generation. I believe that the relatively short Wrangler two-door would not be rated as high as 3600 pounds, and would not be suitable even if it had that rating. While short Wranglers are notorious for concerns about towing stability, the current long-wheelbase model is a substantial vehicle which should be capable of towing a significant travel trailer.

With a 3600 pound trailer, how much allowance is there for passengers and cargo in the Wrangler? You need to look at the whole combination, versus the Gross Combined Weight Rating. Although a non-towing Wrangler can carry up to about 1000 pounds, I'm very sure that one is not rated to haul around its own weight, plus 1000 pounds of stuff in the Jeep, plus 3600 pounds of trailer, all at the same time. The GCWR is in the owner's manual (at least it was in 2010).

An Escape 19' is spec'd at 2510 pounds, dry and base. Add optional equipment, propane, water, and your stuff, and it could easily reach that 3600 pound level. Current 19' owners might comment on what their typical loaded weight is, although each owner's preferences and practices will determine their actual weight. The GVWR is 4000 pounds, and you must not exceed that, but nothing stops anyone from overloading a trailer, which would likely overload the Wrangler.

Which transmission and axle ratio does this Wrangler have?
I have a 4 door rubicon with 4.10 axle and 5 speed automatic. On the door of the jeep it says 5700 gvwr. I'm not sure what all of these numbers mean.
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Old 08-18-2013, 08:26 PM   #9
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Here is a link to understand the terms we are discussing here
Towing Definitions-Understanding Towing weight terms - Fiberglass RV
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Old 08-18-2013, 08:46 PM   #10
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A general guide like the one Jim linked is a good introduction. Also, Jeep owners manuals tend to have a pretty good section which explains the weight ratings, in general terms not just specific to the vehicle. In the 2010 version of the Wrangler manual that starts on page 418, in the Vehicle Loading part of the Starting and Operating chapter.

Quote:
Originally Posted by thedtvman View Post
I have a 4 door rubicon with 4.10 axle and 5 speed automatic. On the door of the jeep it says 5700 gvwr. I'm not sure what all of these numbers mean.
The manual and automatic transmissions are usually considered by the manufacturer to be different in their ability to handle the stresses of towing, so you just need to know which one you have to pick the right line of ratings from the table in the manual (pages 425 to 427 in the 2010 manual, in the Trailer Towing part of the Starting and Operating chapter.

The axle ratio is how much the gears in the axle reduce the driveshaft speed to turn the axles. It doesn't matter so much exactly what this means, but a higher number means that the engine and transmission can turn faster for given speed down the road, allowing them to reliably do more work and thus often allow for a higher overall weight for the vehicle and trailer (GCWR). In the case of the 2010 Wrangler, the 4.10 ratio (which seem to come with the Rubicon package) allows a slightly higher GCWR than otherwise similar Wrangler with the 3.73 ratio.

The GVWR of 5700 pounds means that the Wrangler, including everyone and everything in it, and any tongue weight of the trailer carried on the hitch, must not exceed 5700 pounds. Since a base 4-door Wrangler weighs (at least in the 2010 model year) 4347 pounds, that means all the optional equipment (including a lot of heavy stuff if it's a Rubicon) plus the people plus their stuff plus the trailer tongue weight can't add up to more than 1353 pounds.
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