A Better DIY Adapter to Blow-out Water Lines - Page 4 - Escape Trailer Owners Community

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Old 11-03-2014, 07:40 PM   #31
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Re: "...super fast light weight tug..."

Yowch-- nice fenders!
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Old 11-03-2014, 08:11 PM   #32
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Re: "...super fast light weight tug..."

Yowch-- nice fenders!
I also worry about getting compressor oil in the fresh water system, not to mention the nasty smelling water that accumulates in the compressor. After working with compressed air for almost 40 years, I would never risk contaminating the fresh water system with it. I only use RV antifreeze for winterizing.

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Old 11-03-2014, 08:13 PM   #33
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No, my super fast light weight tug.
Ah, the classic Lotus 7 (or one of its descendants).

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Yowch-- nice fenders!
The sweeping fender (or "wing")... one of the great features of that design, although I like the minimalism and functionality (especially with wider tires) of the cycle fender alternative. Wouldn't help much towing, though...
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Old 11-03-2014, 09:07 PM   #34
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I also worry about getting compressor oil in the fresh water system, not to mention the nasty smelling water that accumulates in the compressor. After working with compressed air for almost 40 years, I would never risk contaminating the fresh water system with it. I only use RV antifreeze for winterizing.

Dave
Other good reasons not to blow out the lines.
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Old 11-03-2014, 09:08 PM   #35
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Unless you use an oil-less compressor.
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Old 11-03-2014, 09:15 PM   #36
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Unless you use an oil-less compressor.
But, what about the condensate that smells like dirty socks.
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Old 11-03-2014, 09:19 PM   #37
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You're supposed to drain the compressor after use, at least that's what my Porter-Cable manual says. There is a valve you open. Shouldn't be any condensate in the compressor.
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Old 11-03-2014, 09:27 PM   #38
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BTW, I'm not defending compressed air. I don't use mine because it's too much work. Have to drag it around or through the house to the front drive, plug it in to an extension cord, find the hose and the city water attachment, do the job ( with my wife inside operating and watching the taps ) and then drain it and drag it back. I find anti-freeze and a hand pump much easier and I know the job is done.
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Old 11-04-2014, 07:24 AM   #39
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You're supposed to drain the compressor after use, at least that's what my Porter-Cable manual says. There is a valve you open. Shouldn't be any condensate in the compressor.
You drain the tank after each use to prevent condensation from forming rust in the tank, which over a long period, could rust out the tank. Anyone who uses an air compressor extensively should know that. If you really want to "dry" the tank, open the drain and run the compressor for a couple of minutes. As far as contaminating water lines with compressor oil, if the compressor is properly maintained, oil contamination is unlikely. About 10 years ago, I experimented with my oil bath compressor which was approximately 10 years old at the time. I sprayed air into a folded paper towel for 5 minutes. Examination of the towel revealed absolutely NO oil. Then I bubbled compressed air through a rather large bucket of water for 30 minutes. When finished, there was absolutely no oil sheen visible on the surface. But I still put an oil seperator on the air line because I frequently use the compressor for spray painting.
Seriously, I worked with public water supply systems for more than 20 years, and having seen some of the stuff in potable water that I have seen, oil contamination from blowing out lines would be the least of my concerns. If you really want to worry about the water you drink, worry about what is called contaminants of emerging concern, like pharmaceuticals which are in water sources almost everywhere. They get into the water supply when excreted by animals and humans after taking various drugs.
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Old 11-04-2014, 07:52 AM   #40
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Originally Posted by C&G in FL View Post
You drain the tank after each use to prevent condensation from forming rust in the tank, which over a long period, could rust out the tank. Anyone who uses an air compressor extensively should know that. If you really want to "dry" the tank, open the drain and run the compressor for a couple of minutes. As far as contaminating water lines with compressor oil, if the compressor is properly maintained, oil contamination is unlikely. About 10 years ago, I experimented with my oil bath compressor which was approximately 10 years old at the time. I sprayed air into a folded paper towel for 5 minutes. Examination of the towel revealed absolutely NO oil. Then I bubbled compressed air through a rather large bucket of water for 30 minutes. When finished, there was absolutely no oil sheen visible on the surface. But I still put an oil seperator on the air line because I frequently use the compressor for spray painting.
Seriously, I worked with public water supply systems for more than 20 years, and having seen some of the stuff in potable water that I have seen, oil contamination from blowing out lines would be the least of my concerns. If you really want to worry about the water you drink, worry about what is called contaminants of emerging concern, like pharmaceuticals which are in water sources almost everywhere. They get into the water supply when excreted by animals and humans after taking various drugs.
Well put Carl, I agree that any tool needs to be maintained and a compressor is no exception. I paint with mine regularly and any contamination in the air lines (water, oil, etc) becomes instantly visible as flaws in the paint job. I have the opinion that I don't want to consume any chemicals when I can avoid them (like RV Antifreeze), that is the reason I blow out my lines. Use an oil seperator and an air drying if you are concerned. If you simply fully charge your compressor tank and let if cool, any water/oil will condense at the bottom of the tank, a quick drain before blowing out the trailer with the cooled air.
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